WMST 4671
NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS

www.faculty.de.gcsu.edu/~mmagouli

Instructor: Dr. Mary Magoulick Office Phone: 445-3177
Office: A&S 3-21 magoulick@yahoo.com Hours: TBA

Texts
Allen, Paula Gunn. The Woman Who Owned The Shadows. San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books, 1983.
Crow Dog, Mary (with Richard Erdoes). Lakota Woman. New York: HarperPerennial, 1990.
Deloria, Ella Cara. Waterlily. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1990.
Erdrich, Louise. The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse. New York: Harper Perennial, 2001.
Green, Rayna. That's What She Said: Contemporary Poetry and Fiction by Native American Women. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1984
Hale, Janet Campbell. The Jailing of Cecelia Capture. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1986.
Hogan, Linda. Power. New York: WW Norton & Co., 1998
Howe, Leanne. Shell Shaker. Aunt Lute Books, 2001.
Silko, Leslie. Gardens in the Dunes. New York: Scribner Paperback Fiction, 2000.

Course Objectives
We will consider various contemporary and traditional works written by Native American women, with special emphasis on socio-cultural contexts of each work. We will pay special attention to issues of gender and identity as they surface in the poetry, fiction, and autobiography we read. We will also consider the extent to which the works bridge traditional and contemporary Native American perspectives, themes and literary styles. Our consideration of cultural contexts and implications of the literature will lead to larger questions and issues regarding both women's studies and Native American studies. Gender and identity often surface most poignantly in the work of women whose lives are marginalized in the mainstream. Our discussions may lead us to ponder as well more general issues connected to the cannon and contextual studies of literature.

Course Description
This course will involve lectures and discussions of the works students will read outside the classroom as homework. The professor will offer contextual information for the cultures and authors of each of the works to be considered and will lead students in careful textual analysis of the novels we read. You are not required to have any prior knowledge of Native American cultures or women. What is important is a sense of curiosity about Native American women writers and their cultures and a willingness to do the readings and participate in the course. You will also write a short critical response to a reading, a final, in-depth, analytical essay, and a final exam that will give you an opportunity to discuss comparatively the works and issues from class.

Requirements

Grading

Critical Response: 20%
Examination: 30%
Final Essay: 50%

Grades on individual assignments will be based on effort and thoughtfulness as well as correctness of logic and development of ideas. Critical responses should use the text as a guide in analysis.





Notes


Calendar of Classes / Readings



Week 1 - Brief history / survey of major geographic and cultural areas (slide lecture)

Week 2 - Read and discuss poems and stories from Green's anthology

Week 3 - Read and discuss Deloria's Waterlily

Week 4&5 - Read and discuss Crow Dog, Lakota Woman

Weeks 6&7 - Read and discuss Gunn Allen's The Woman Who Owned the Shadows

Weeks 8&9 - Read & discuss Campbell's The Jailing of Cecilia Capture

Weeks 10&11 - Read & discuss Read and discuss Silko's Gardens of the Dunes

Week 8 - CRITICAL RESPONSE DUE

Weeks 12&13 - Read & discuss Hogan's Power

Weeks 14&15 - Read & discuss Erdrich, Last Report on Miracle at Little No Horse

FINAL ESSAYS DUE

Week 16 - Final discussions and FINAL EXAM




ENGL 4671
NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE

www.faculty.de.gcsu.edu/~mmagouli

Instructor: Dr. Mary Magoulick Office Phone: 445-3177
Office: A&S 3-21 magoulick@yahoo.com Hours: TBA



Texts (for a general version of the course)
Alexie, Sherman. Reservation Blues. Warner Books, 1996.
Erdrich, Louise. Love Medicine: New and Expanded Version. New York: HarperCollins,1993 (originally published 1984).
Hogan, Linda. Solar Storms. New York: Scribner, 1997.
Momaday, N. Scott. The Ancient Child. New York: HarperCollins, 1990.
Owens, Louis. Dark River: a Novel. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999.
Purdy, John and James Ruppert (editors). Nothing But the Truth: An Anthology of Native American Literature. New York: Prentice Hall, 2000.
Silko, Leslie. Ceremony. New York: Penguin Books, 1986 (originally published 1977).
Swann, Brian. Coming to Light. Contemporary Translations of the Native American Literatures of North America. New York: Vintage Books, 1994.

Course Objectives
We will read and discuss various contemporary and traditional literature written by Native Americans, with special emphasis on cultural contexts of each work. Only recently has Native American literature been allowed into the canon of literary studies, yet it represents some of the most profound and metaphorically rich writing today. Native American cultures today remain vital, in the process of a dynamic renewal of identity, as each of our readings will demonstrate. By examining some traditional Native American literature (as we explore the contexts of our texts), we will also ponder the meaning of tradition and authenticity and more generally the dynamics of culture. Although many Native American writers today draw upon themes, images, and characters from traditional Native American myths, tales, and songs, they nonetheless set their works in our world, often focusing upon blending of cultural impulses and demonstrating the ongoing vitality of their cultures in the contemporary world. Our consideration of cultural contexts and implications of the literature will lead to larger questions and issues regarding both Native American history and the overall importance of context in the study of literary texts.

Course Description
This course will involve lectures and discussions of the works students will read outside the classroom as homework. The professor will offer contextual information for the cultures and authors of each of the works to be considered and will lead students in careful textual analysis of the novels we read. You are not required to have any prior knowledge of Native American cultures or literature. What is important is a sense of curiosity about Native American literature and culture and a willingness to do the readings and participate in the course. You will also write a short critical response to a reading, a final, in-depth, analytical essay, and a final exam that will give you an opportunity to discuss comparatively the works and issues from class.

Requirements

Grading

Critical Response: 20
Examination: 30%
Final Essay: 50%

Grades on individual assignments will be based on effort and thoughtfulness as well as correctness of logic and development of ideas. Critical responses should use the text as a guide in analysis.



Notes


Calendar of Classes / Readings

Week 1 - Brief history / survey of major geographic and cultural areas (slide lecture)

Week 2 - Read and discuss traditional Native American literature (from Swann reader)

Weeks 3&4 - Read and discuss Silko, Ceremony

Weeks 5&6- Read and discuss Momaday, The Ancient Child

Weeks 7&8 - Read & discuss Erdrich, Love Medicine CRITICAL RESPONSE DUE

Weeks 9&10 - Read & discuss Alexie, Reservation Blues

Weeks 11- Read & discuss poetry (from Purdy reader)

Weeks 12&13 - Read and discuss Hogan, Solar Storms

Weeks 14&15 - Read and discuss Owens, Dark River FINAL ESSAYS DUE

Week 16 FINAL EXAM