ASAIL Newsletter and ASAIL Notes, 1973-98

* * * *
ASAIL Officers 1980 - 2015

* * * *
ASAIL Bylaws

* * * *
Report to the Program Committee of the Modern Language Association for Renewal of Allied Status for the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL)
1999     2006

* * * *
MLA Programs Arranged by the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures, 1980 - 2014

* * * *
Minutes of the ASAIL Business Meeting
2012
2009     2010     2011
2008     2007     2006
2005     2004     2002

* * * *
ASAIL Treasurer's Report
2009     2010


 2014-15 ASAIL Officers

[for officers since 2015, see http://people.uwm.edu/asail/about/past-officers/]

President: Jill Doerfler, U Minnesota-Duluth
Vice-President: Becca Gercken, U Minnesota-Morris
Secretary: Barbara Robins, U of Nebraska-Omaha
Treasurer: Jeff Berglund, Northern Arizona U
Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond
[ex officio] SAIL Editors: Chad Allen, U of Ohio



 Previous ASAIL Officers



2013-14      President: Margaret Noori, U of Michigan; Vice-President: Jill Doerfler, U Minnesota-Duluth; Secretary: Barbara Robins, U of Nebraska-Omaha; Treasurer: Jeff Berglund, Northern Arizona U; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Chad Allen, U of Ohio

2012-13     President: Margaret Noori, U of Michigan; Vice-President: Jill Doerfler, U Minnesota-Duluth; Secretary: Tereza Szeghi, U of Dayton; Treasurer: Jeff Berglund, Northern Arizona U; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Chad Allen, U of Ohio

2011-12    President: Jodi Byrd, U of Illinois; Vice-President: Margaret Noori, U of Michigan; Secretary: Tereza Szeghi, U of Dayton; Treasurer: Jeff Berglund, Northern Arizona U; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editors: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto and James Cox, U of Texas

2010-11    President: Jodi Byrd, U of Illinois; Vice-President: Margaret Noori, U of Michigan; Secretary: Amy Hamilton, Northern Michigan U; Treasurer: [pro tem] Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editors: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto and James Cox, U of Texas

2009-10    President: Patrice Hollrah, U of Nevada - Las Vegas; Vice-President: Jodi Byrd, U of Illinois; Secretary: Amy Hamilton, Northern Michigan U; Treasurer: [pro tem] Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editors: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto and James Cox, U of Texas

2008-09   President: Patrice Hollrah, U of Nevada - Las Vegas; Vice-President: Jodi Byrd, U of Illinois; Secretary: Christina Roberts, Seattle U; Treasurer: Ellen Arnold, East Carolina U; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editors: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto and James Cox, U of Texas

2007-08  President: Debra K. S. Barker, U of Wisconsin - Eau Claire; Vice-President: Patrice Hollrah, U of Nevada - Las Vegas; Secretary: Christina Roberts, U of Arizona; Treasurer: Ellen Arnold, East Carolina U; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto

2006-07  President: Debra K. S. Barker, U of Wisconsin - Eau Claire; Vice-President: Patrice Hollrah, U of Nevada - Las Vegas; Secretary: Lisa Tatonetti, U of Wisconsin - Oshkosh; Treasurer: Siobhan Senier, U of New Hampshire; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto

2005-06  President: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto; Vice-President: Debra K. S. Barker, U of Wisconsin - Eau Claire; Secretary: Lisa Tatonetti, U of Wisconsin - Oshkosh; Treasurer: Siobhan Senier, U of New Hampshire; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Malea Powell, Michigan State U

2004-05  President: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto; Vice-President: Debra K. S. Barker, U of Wisconsin - Eau Claire; Secretary: Patrice Hollrah, U of Nevada - Las Vegas; Treasurer-elect: Siobhan Senier, U of New Hampshire; Historian: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Malea Powell, Michigan State U

2003  President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State U; Vice-President: Debra K. S. Barker, U of Wisconsin - Eau Claire; Secretary: Patrice Hollrah, U of Nevada - Las Vegas; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

2002  President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State U; Vice-President: Deborah Miranda, U of Washington; Secretary: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Nebraska - Lincoln; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

2001  President: Joyzelle Godfrey; Vice-President: Deborah Miranda, U of Washington; Secretary: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Nebraska - Lincoln; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

2000  President: Joyzelle Godfrey; Vice-President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State U; Secretary: Malea Powell, U of Nebraska - Lincoln; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

1999  President: Ginny Carney, U of Kentucky; Vice-President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State U; Secretary: Ruth Rosenberg, Brooklyn, New York; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

1998  President, Ginny Carney, U of Kentucky; Vice-President, Ken Roemer, U of Texas, Arlington; Secretary, Ruth Rosenberg, Brooklyn, New York; Treasurer, Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

1997  President, Susan Scarberry-García, Navajo Preparatory School, NM; Vice-President, Ginny Carney, U of Kentucky; Secretary, Ruth Rosenberg; Treasurer, Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

1996   President, Susan Scarberry-García, Navajo Preparatory School; Vice-President, Betty Louise Bell, U of Michigan; Secretary, Inés Hernandez-Ávila, U of California, Davis; Treasurer, Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

1994-1995  President, Kate Shanley, Cornell U; Vice-President, Betty Louise Bell, U of Michigan; Secretary, Inés Hernandez-Ávila; Treasurer, Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

1993  President, Hertha Wong, U of California, Berkeley; Vice-President, Betty Louise Bell; Secretary, Inés Hernandez-Ávila; Treasurer, Robert Nelson, U of Richmond

1992  President, Hertha Wong; Vice-President, Gretchen Ronnow, Northern Arizona U; Secretary, Toby Langen, U of Arizona; Treasurer, Elizabeth McDade, U of Richmond

1991  President, Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati; Vice-President, Greg Sarris; Secretary-Treasurer, Elizabeth McDade, U of Richmond

1990  President, Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati; Vice-President, Andrea Lerner; Secretary-Treasurer, Elizabeth McDade, U of Richmond

1989  President, James Ruppert, U of Alaska, Fairbanks; Vice-President, Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati

1988  President, Kathleen Sands, Arizona State U; Vice-President, James Ruppert, U of Alaska, Fairbanks

1987  President, Daniel F. Littlefield, U of Arkansas, Little Rock

1986  President, Susan Scarberry-García, Colorado College

1985  President, Andrew Wiget, New Mexico State U

1984  President, Paul Zolbrod, Allegheny College

1983  President, Elaine Jahner, U of Nebraska

1982  President, Larry Evers, U of Arizona; Secretary, Elaine Jahner, U of Nebraska

1981  President, Jarold Ramsey, U of Rochester; Secretary, Elaine Jahner, U of Nebraska

1980  President, LaVonne Brown Ruoff, U of Illinois, Chicago

** Since the ASAIL treasury is so intimately connected to the SAIL mailing list, and since the journal has been produced at the U of Richmond since late 1989, the Association voted in 1995 to suspend a by-law in order to re-elect Robert Nelson as a standing officer (Treasurer) of ASAIL; this suspension was revoked in 2004.



 


 ASAIL Bylaws

ASAIL January 4, 1991, amended 2002, amended 2004, amended 2009.

I. Name of the organization. The name of the organization shall be The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures.

II. Purpose. {Amended 2009} The purpose of the organization shall be to promote study, criticism, and research on the oral traditions and written literatures of Native Americans; to promote the teaching of such traditions and literatures; and to support and encourage contemporary Native American writers and the continuity of Native oral traditions. The organization shall operate exclusively for these educational purposes in accordance with section 503(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code or corresponding section of any future federal tax code.

III. Membership. There shall be three categories of membership. The dues within each category shall be established by the Executive Committee following consultation with association members at a business meeting.

A. Regular membership. Educators professionally interested in the above-stated purpose of the organization or persons otherwise active in furthering such goals may become regular members of the association.

B. Limited income membership. Persons retired from professions relevant to the above-stated purpose and Native American writers may apply for membership in this category. Also, graduate students engaged in courses of study in Native American oral traditions or writing may for a maximum of four years become members at this level, provided they do not hold full-time teaching positions.

C. Patron. Persons who contribute at higher financial levels than required for regular membership may join the association at this level.

D. Honorary membership. Honorary membership may be granted to distinguished persons of letters and scholars of any nationality upon nomination by the Executive Committee and election by the membership at an association business meeting.

E. Only members in good standing may hold office in the association and vote in association elections and meetings.

IV. Officers--Responsibilities
A
. The officers of the association shall be a president, a vice-president, a secretary and a treasurer.

B. With the advice of the Executive Committee, the president shall administer the affairs of the association. The president shall preside at meetings of the Executive Committee and at associate business meetings. Also, the president shall communicate regularly with members through the association journal concerning association business.

C. The vice-president shall preside at all Executive Committee meetings and business meetings from which the president must be absent. In addition, the vice-president shall assume presidential administrative duties when so requested by the president and the Executive Committee and shall serve as liaison with other organizations whose professional purposes correspond to ASAIL's.

D. The secretary shall record the minutes of Executive Committee meetings and of membership business meetings. A summary of business meeting minutes shall be published in the association journal as soon as feasible following each meeting. The secretary shall also preserve minutes of all meetings for five years and shall pass these on to the succeeding secretary.

E. The treasurer shall collect and manage association funds (including keeping accurate and current records of association income, assets, and expenses) so as to further association goals. As major instruments for achieving these goals, the association journal and newsletter shall receive priority in the expenditure of association funds. In addition, the treasurer shall maintain accurate and current membership lists and shall answer all queries regarding membership. The treasurer shall also make financial reports at Executive Committee meetings and at association business meetings. The association financial records shall be available to the Executive Committee upon request.

V. Officers -- Election
A.
Officers shall be elected from among current membership.

B. {Amended 2002} The slate of nominees for election shall be prepared by the Election Committee prior to the association's annual business meeting at the Native American Literature Symposium.

C. {Amended 2002} Election of officers shall be by secret ballot at the annual business meeting during the Native American Literature Symposium. However, in unusual and compelling circumstances, the Executive Committee may, with the approval of the members present at this meeting, choose to conduct the election by mail ballot.

D. Terms and Sequence of Elections

     1. The initial election officers shall be conducted as follows: In December, 1991, the president and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms; the vice-president and the secretary shall be elected to one year terms.

     2. Beginning with the elections of officers in December, 1992, the election sequence shall be as follows: The president and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms in odd-numbered years; the vice-president and the secretary shall be elected to two year terms in even-numbered years.

     3.{Amended 2002} Beginning with the elections of officers in March, 2004, the election sequence shall be as follows: the secretary and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms in each odd-numbered year; the president shall automatically be succeeded by the vice-president, and a new vice-president elected, in each even-numbered year.

E. Neither the president nor the vice-president may be elected to consecutive terms.

VI. Executive Committee
A.
The Executive Committee shall meet as often as feasible to conduct association business. In any event, the Committee shall meet at least once a year at the Modern Language Association convention and once prior to the business meeting at the association's own convention, if any.

B. {Amended 2004} The membership of the Executive Committee shall include the president, the vice-president, the secretary, the treasurer, the editor of the association journal, and the association historian.

C. The responsibilities of the Committee shall be:

     1. to further the goals of the organization;

     2. to initiate and supervise the services of the association;

     3. to approve the budget of the association and to supervise its expenditure and to act on proposals regarding dues structure and subscription rates for publications;

     4. to make recommendations to the membership, to act on recommendations by members, and to inform members of actions taken;

     5. to establish and discharge committees, either on recommendation of the membership or on its own initiative, and to designate their chairs;

     6. {Amended 2004} to oversee publications, media, and archives of the association, including appointing, assisting, and advising the editor of the association journal and the association historian;

     7. to plan conventions and other meetings of the association.

VII. Association Meetings
A.
{Amended 2002} The association shall hold business meetings during either the Native American Literature Symposium or its own convention, if any, and during the annual Modern Language Association convention.

B. The association shall hold conventions at times and places determined by the Executive Committee. In an emergency, the Executive Committee shall have the power to cancel a convention.

C. Conventions shall be planned by the Executive Committee with the advice of a program committee appointed by the Executive Committee.

D. Association sessions at the annual Modern Language Association convention shall be planned by session chairs appointed by the Executive Committee.

VIII. Amendments
A.
Proposals for amendments to these by-laws may be initiated by the Executive Committee or by any association member.

B. {Amended 2002} All amendments to be brought before the membership shall be published at least ninety days before the business meeting at which they are to be voted on or mailed to members at least thirty days before the business meeting.

C. Amendments must be approved by a majority of those voting at the business meeting. With the approval of those present at such a meeting, the Executive Committee may choose to conduct the voting among the entire membership by mail.

IX. Dissolution
A. The association may be dissolved only by a vote of the members present at a special meeting called for that purpose.

B. {Amended 2009} On the dissolution of the association, all property remaining after the satisfaction of the association's obligations shall be distributed as the Executive Committee directs, choosing the recipients from non-profit Native American educational institutions whose goals are consistent with the interests of the association and who qualify as exempt within the meaning of section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code or corresponding section of any future federal tax code.

 N.B. At the 12/29/90 business meeting, the membership directed the officers to proceed with incorporation. If the above document is passed by ASAIL members, the officers shall take such acceptance as authority to add to the by-laws immediately (without recourse to the above amending procedure) such language as incorporation may require.

 


2006 REPORT TO THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE
OF THE MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION
FOR RENEWAL OF ALLIED STATUS FOR
THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURES (ASAIL)



The members of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL), an allied organization of the Modern Language Association, petition the Program Committee of MLA to renew ASAIL's allied status.

I. HISTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURES (ASAIL), 1999-2006.

The last seven years have seen significant developments in ASAIL's mandate, which broadly includes the following: (a) promoting the rigorous and respectful study, criticism, and research in the oral traditions and literatures of Indigenous peoples throughout North America; (b) encouraging scholarship that attends to the sociopolitical priorities of Indigenous peoples and nationhood; (c) providing strong mentorship and professionalization opportunities for graduate students and junior scholars in the field; (d) expanding access to relevant pedagogical resources through conferences and the ASAIL listserve; and (d) drawing on the work of established literary voices, senior scholars, and elders, while also expanding the range of texts, critical perspectives, and analytical considerations in new and exciting directions.

Since 2002, ASAIL has had a strong relationship with the Native American Literary Symposium (NALS), an annual conference organized by a group of Native scholars in the field (the "Clan Mothers") and held in Native-owned venues throughout the United States. With the Clan Mothers' generous permission, ASAIL's annual business meeting is now held at NALS as both a symbolic and physical reminder to our membership of the expanded organizational mandate, particularly our commitment to linking literary studies to the lived realities of Indigenous peoples.

This shift in location of our business meeting has not, however, resulted in a lessening of our participation in the MLA. ASAIL has maintained a consistent and engaged presence at the MLA annual convention, with at least two sponsored panels each year, along with a cross-fertilization of both members and ideas with our annual convention meeting that takes place in association with the MLA Division on American Indian Literatures. The panels are consistently well-attended, and they have long been a forum through which new members (at least fifteen each year) are introduced to the Association and its resources.

Our active work at the MLA convention in introducing scholars to the cutting-edge of research in the field of American Indian literatures is just one example of our suitability for continuing our allied status. Three others include our journal, Studies in American Indian Literatures (SAIL), our official association website, and the ASAIL listserv, all of which provide resources to established and emerging scholars (as well as interested laypeople and community members).

Studies in American Indian Literatures is the only scholarly journal in the United States and Canada that focuses exclusively on American Indian literatures (Series 1: 1977-1987; Series 2, 1989-present). The journal was, for many years, published quarterly out of the University of Richmond under the careful supervision of our various editors and our long-time treasurer (now historian), Robert Nelson. As the field and our mandate expanded, so to did our needs, and in 2003, the journal's editor, Malea Powell, and ASAIL's former president, Chadwick Allen, signed a contract with the University of Nebraska Press for a publishing agreement between the Association and the Press. The journal began publishing quarterly with the Press with Series 2, Volume 16, Number 1 (Spring 2004).

As a result, SAIL's profile has increased significantly: it is available to a much broader audience, as it is now prominently featured alongside the Press's other outstanding Native Studies journals and monographs; it is accessible electronically through Project Muse; and it is now indexed through Thomson Arts and Humanities Index and ERIC. [See sample copies of journal included with Report.]

Our website ( http://facultystaff.richmond.edu/~rnelson/ ASAIL/) not only includes Association information (bylaws, meeting minutes and notes, calls for papers, and announcements), it is also regularly updated with pedagogy and professionalization resources, including course syllabi and outlines, recent books of interest, an up-todate list of Native Studies programs in the United States and Canada, and full-text past issues of SAIL (pre-V.16).

The ASAIL listserv, which includes 268 subscribers, is very active, and provides a core group of our members with the most up-to-date information on scholarship in the field, including vigorous discussions about issues of significance in Native literary studies. The listserv, which is maintained by David Payne at the University of Georgia, and the website, maintained by Robert Nelson, have replaced ASAIL Notes as the immediate forum for disciplinary and Association news, business, and resources. Much of the information provided on the listserv is subsequently archived on our website for easy access to both ASAIL members and the broader public.

The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures has continued its long and productive collaboration with the Division on American Indian

Literatures through coordinating panel sessions during a joint meeting at each convention. Our members are also active on the committee on Literatures and languages of America and the MLA Delegate Assembly.

II. ONGOING ACTIVITY

With an active and engaged membership, ASAIL continues its long history of participation in the national MLA convention, as well as other symposia and conferences throughout the United States [see Appendix B for ASAIL-sponsored MLA programs from 1999-2006].

Our members, both individual and institutional, are kept informed about upcoming conferences and publication calls for papers through our website, listserv, and journal.

As discussed in Section I of this report, ASAIL has strengthened its reputation as the premier site for Native literary scholarship through the expanded profile of Studies in American Indian Literatures. In recognition of the organization's commitment to both the broader scholarly community and Indigenous communities throughout North America, ASAIL provides free subscriptions of the journal to tribal colleges, thus strengthening the reciprocal link between Native peoples and the scholarship that represents them. Each issue of SAIL also includes addresses for the official governments of the tribal nations referenced in the issue, thus providing scholars with contact information to further responsible scholarship in the field.

III. DIVERSE PARTICIPATION IN ASAIL ACTIVITIES

While focusing on the literatures and languages of the Indigenous Americas, as per our mandate, ASAIL is inclusive of a diverse and interdisciplinary constituency that includes scholars and non-academics, both Native and non-Native. Our long-time commitment to supporting Indigenous scholars and writers in the

IV. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures was founded in 1972.

The purpose of the organization shall be to promote study, criticism, and research on the oral traditions and literatures of Native Americans; to promote the teaching of such traditions and literatures; and to support and encourage contemporary Native American writers and the continuity of Native American oral traditions.

V. ASAIL BYLAWS

Please see Appendix C for ASAIL's bylaws, which were revised and approved by ASAIL membership in March 1991, with subsequent amendments approved in 2002 and 2004.

VI. CURRENT MEMBERSHIP

ASAIL currently has around 280 individual and 140 institutional members and subscribers. The membership has a broadly international scope, with representation from many different countries, including Canada, the United States, Mexico, Argentina, Germany, Italy, England, and New Zealand. Please see Appendix D for a sample membership application.

VII. DESCRIPTION OF DUES STRUCTURE

ASAIL maintains four categories of association membership:

Individual membership

$ 30

Limited income membership

$ 20

Sponsor

$ 50

Patron

$ 100

ASAIL's publishing agreement with the University of Nebraska Press provides for a $75 institutional subscription price for SAIL.

Benefits of ASAIL membership include subscriptions to SAIL and the ASAIL listserv; donations at the Sponsor and Patron level are acknowledged in the first issue of each volume year.

Respectfully submitted,

Daniel Heath Justice, President (2004-2006)
Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL)




APPENDIX A

Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures
Executive Committees, 1999-2006

2006-2007
President: Debra K.S. Barker, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (2006-2008); Vice-President: Patrice E.M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas (2006-2008); Secretary: Lisa Tatonetti, Kansas State University (2005-2007); Treasurer: Siobhan Senier, University of New Hampshire (2005-2007); Historian: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond (standing officer); [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto (2006-2011)

2005-2006
President: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto (2004-2006); Vice-President: Debra K.S. Barker, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (2004-2006; President, 20062008); Secretary: Lisa Tatonetti, Kansas State University (2005-2007); Treasurer: Siobhan Senier, University of New Hampshire (2005-2007); Historian: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond (standing officer); [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Malea Powell, Michigan State University (2000-2006)

2004-2005
President: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto; Vice-President: Debra K.S. Barker, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire; Secretary: Patrice Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Treasurer-elect: Siobhan Senier; Historian: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond; [ex officio] SAIL Editor: Malea Powell, Michigan State University

2003-2004
President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University; Vice-President: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto; Secretary: Patrice Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond**

2002-2003
President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University; Vice-President: Deborah Miranda, University of Washington; Secretary: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond

2001-2002
President: Joyzelle Godfrey; Vice-President: Deborah Miranda, University of Washington; Secretary: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond

2000-2001
President: Joyzelle Godfrey; Vice-President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University; Secretary: Malea Powell, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond

1999-2000
President: Ginny Carney, University of Kentucky; Vice-President: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University; Secretary: Ruth Rosenberg; Treasurer: Robert Nelson, University of Richmond

**Since the ASAIL treasury was, for many years, so intimately connected to the SAIL mailing list, and since the journal had been produced at the University of Richmond from late 1989 to 2003, the Association voted in 1995 to suspend a bylaw in order to re-elect Robert Nelson as a standing officer (Treasurer) of ASAIL. When production of SAIL moved to the University of Nebraska Press in 2003, the Association voted to return to observance of the bylaw, thus opening the position of Treasurer to a general vote of the members. In recognition of Robert Nelson's long and able service to the Association over many years, and his continuing dedication to the organization and the larger field, the membership voted to create the standing office of Historian and named Nelson the first ASAIL Historian.


APPENDIX B

MLA Programs Arranged by
the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures
1999-2006

2006: Philadelphia (Calls for Papers)

American Indian Literatures in Global Contexts. Presiding: Chadwick Allen

Teaching the American Indian Boarding School Experience. Presiding: Deborah Miranda



2005: Washington, D.C.

Broadening the Conversation: Teaching beyond the Canonical Native Writers. Presiding: Debra K.S. Barker, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire; Connie Augustine Jacobs, San Juan College
Speakers: Granville Ganter, Saint John's University, NY; Virginia Kennedy, University of Scranton; Siobhan Senier, University of New Hampshire, Durham; Kenneth Morrison Roemer, University of Texas, Arlington; James K. Ruppert, University of Alaska, Fairbanks

Ethics and American Indian Cultures. Presiding: Christina A. Roberts, University of Arizona

  1. "'Nobody Wants to Hear These Things': Academic Freedom and Ethics in Teaching Sherman Alexie's 'Can I Get a Witness?,'" Patrice E. M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  2. "Modes of Ethnographic and Ethical Inquiry in Teaching American Indian Texts," Karen Lee Osborne, Columbia College, IL
  3. Creating Ethical Learning Communities," Laura J. Beard, Texas Tech University



2004: Philadelphia

Problems in Applying Feminist Theory to Native American Literature. Presiding: Patrice E.M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

  1. "Navajo Womanhood in Luci Tapahonso's 'Blue Horses Rush In,'" Tereza M. Szeghi, University of Arizona
  2. "Ignatia Broker's Lived Feminism: Toward a Native Women's Theory," Molly McGlennen, University of California, Davis
  3. "Feminism, Nation, and the Fourth World: A Comparative Approach to Indigenous American Women's Writing," Janet McAdams, Kenyon College

American Indian Literature and Visual Culture. Presiding: Dean Rader, University of San Francisco

  1. "Speaking Chinook: Multicultural Images in the Self-Representations and Pacific Coast Stories of E. Pauline Johnson," Martha L. Viehmann, Northern Kentucky University
  2. "Liberating Words: Texts and Contexts in Edgar Heap of Bird's 'Wheel,'" Robert A. Warrior, University of Oklahoma
  3. "Claiming Another Homeland: Native Novelists and Visual Artists Look to Europe," Lee F. Schweninger, University of North Carolina, Wilmington
  4. "Cinema and Poetry: Sherwin Bitsui's Intertexual Performance," Angelica M. Lawson, Dartmouth College



2003: San Diego

Opening Our Canon: Teaching Lesser-Known Native Writers. Presiding: Virginia I. Carney, Leech Lake Tribal College

  1. "Land Speaking in Whispers: Jeanette Armstrong's Indigenist Fiction," Joanne R. DiNova, Corunna, Ontario
  2. "Esther Belin and Laura Tohe: Urban and Traditional Diné (Navajo) Poetry," P. Jane Hafen, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  3. "Teaching LeAnne Howe's Shellshaker with a Tribalography Approach," Patrice E.M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

"The Dirt Is Red Here": Literature and Art of Native California. Presiding: Deborah A. Miranda, Pacific Lutheran University
Speakers: Greg Sarris, Loyola Marymount University; Sylvia Ross, Lemon Grove, CA; L. Frank Manriquez, Sebastopol, CA; Frank LaPena, California State University, Sacramento



2002: New York City

Native Literature in Native Classrooms: The Challenge of Teaching in a Tribal College. Presiding: Patrice E.M. Hollrah, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

  1. "Higher Education and the Ancient Knowledge of the Ojibway," Michael W. price, Red Lake Nation College
  2. "The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: The Challenge of Teaching in a Tribal College," Virginia I. Carney, Leech Lake Tribal College

Constructing Indigenous Consciousness in Colonizing Languages. Presiding: Daniel Heath Justice, University of Toronto

  1. "Speaking for Ourselves," Simon J. Ortiz, University of Toronto
  2. "Languages of the Indigenous Web," David A. Golumbia, Long Beach, CA
  3. "Evidence of Indigenous Consciousness in a Colonizing Language: Resilience and Resistance in the Poetry of Ofelia Zepeda," Angelica M. Lawson, University of Arizona
  4. "Lost in Translation: Expressing Haida Ideology in English," Frederick White, Slippery Rock University



2001: New Orleans

Teaching American Indian Literatures in Multicultural Contexts. Presiding: Eric Gary Anderson, Oklahoma State University

  1. "'Remember, We Are Dancing a Revolution': A Nonutopic Approach to Teaching Multiculturalism," Timothy Burgess Powell, University of Georgia
  2. "Dances with Poles: Teaching American Indian Literatures to Eastern Europeans; or, A Survival Manual for Cultural Critique outside of the Americas," Alexia Kosmider, University of Rhode Island
  3. "Two Indians: A Comparative Approach to Teaching American Indian and South Asian American Literature in the Multiethnic Classroom," Karen M. Cardozo-Kane, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  4. "Talking Cultures, Teaching U.S. Literatures Relationally," AnaLouise Keating, Texas Woman's University

American Indian Protest Literatures. Presiding: Malea D. Powell, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

  1. "The Good, the Bad, and Elias Boudinot: Bringing the Literatures of American Indian Protest and Accommodation into Dialogue," Stephen J. Brandon, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  2. "'Remember Wounded Knee': The American Indian Movement and Twenty-First-Century Protest," Elizabeth Mary Rich, Saginaw Valley State University
  3. "Heartspeak from the Spirit: John Trudell's Message of Resistance," Kim Lee, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  4. "Indigenous Reading, Sovereign Theory," Chadwick Allen, Ohio State University, Columbus



2000: Washington, D.C.

Uncanonized American Indian and First Nations Writers. Presiding: Malea D. Powell, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

  1. "Raven and the American Dream: Robert Davis and Tlingit Poetics," Susan Elizabeth Kollin, Montana State University, Bozeman
  2. "'Mother of U.S. Senator an Indian Queen': Cultural Challenge and Appropriation in The Memoirs of Narcissa Owens," Stephen J. Brandon, University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  3. "Claiming a Voice: Shirley Sterling's My Name is Seepeetza," Laura J. Beard, University de las Americas, Puebla
  4. "The Creation of Deviance: Janet Hale's The Jailing of Cecilia Capture," Sandra K. Baringer, University of California, Riverside

Teaching Native American Literature from an Indigenous Perspective. Presiding: Joanne R. DiNova, University of Waterloo, ON. Respondent: Gwen N. Griffin, Minnesota State University

  1. "Introducing Alaska Native Oral Literatures: A Haida Raven Story," Jeane Breinig, University of Alaska, Anchorage
  2. "'So Where's Your Headdress?': Teaching against Stereotypes in the Native Lit Classroom," Daniel H. Justice, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  3. "Teaching American Indian Literature to American Indian Students," Joyzelle Godfrey, Lower Brule Community College, SD



1999: Chicago

North American Literatures in Indigenous Languages. Presiding: Joanne R. DiNova, University of Waterloo

  1. "The Joys and Sorrows of Talking on the Page," Nora Marks Dauenhauer, Sealaska Corp.
  2. "Sustaining Our Culture: The Revitalization of the Cherokee Language," Lynne Harlan, Cherokee, NC; Marie Junaluska, Cherokee, NC
  3. "Naming Metaphor: Who Defines Raven in Native Literature?" Lee Maracle, University of Toronto

Teaching Native American Literature from an Indigenous Perspective. Presiding: Virginia I. Carney, Eastern Kentucky University

  1. "Teaching Tribal Sovereignty or Colonial Identity? Advocacy and the Politics of Complexity," David Lewis Moore, University of Montana
  2. "Rhetorical Sovereignty and Native Literatures: From the Perspective of Indigenism," Scott Richard Lyons, Miami University, Oxford
  3. "Confronting Bigotry, Teaching Compassion: A Historical Approach to Teaching Native American Literature," Janice M. Gould, Portland Community College, OR

A Reading by Susan Power (Yanktonnai Dakota)
Program arranged by MLA Committee on the Literatures and Languages of America, the MLA Division on American Indian Literatures, the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures, and the D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History, Newberry Library


APPENDIX C

ASAIL Bylaws
Approved January 4, 1991; amended 2002, 2004

I. Name of the organization. The name of the organization shall be The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures.

II. Purpose. The purpose of the organization shall be to promote study, criticism, and research on the oral traditions and written literatures of Native Americans; to promote the teaching of such traditions and literatures; and to support and encourage contemporary Native American writers and the continuity of Native oral traditions.

III. Membership. There shall be three categories of membership. The dues within each category shall be established by the Executive Committee following consultation with association members at a business meeting.

A. Regular membership. Educators professionally interested in the above-stated purpose of the organization or persons otherwise active in furthering such goals may become regular members of the association.

B. Limited income membership. Persons retired from professions relevant to the above-stated purpose and Native American writers may apply for membership in this category. Also, graduate students engaged in courses of study in Native American oral traditions or writing may for a maximum of four years become members at this level, provided they do not hold full-time teaching positions.

C. Patron. Persons who contribute at higher financial levels than required for regular membership may join the association at this level.

D. Honorary membership. Honorary membership may be granted to distinguished persons of letters and scholars of any nationality upon nomination by the Executive Committee and election by the membership at an association business meeting.

E. Only members in good standing may hold office in the association and vote in association elections and meetings.

IV. Officers--Responsibilities

A. The officers of the association shall be a president, a vice-president, a secretary and a treasurer.

B. With the advice of the Executive Committee, the president shall administer the affairs of the association. The president shall preside at meetings of the Executive Committee and at associate business meetings. Also, the president shall communicate regularly with members through the association journal concerning association business.

C. The vice-president shall preside at all Executive Committee meetings and business meetings from which the president must be absent. In addition, the vice-president shall assume presidential administrative duties when so requested by the president and the Executive Committee and shall serve as liaison with other organizations whose professional purposes correspond to ASAIL's.

D. The secretary shall record the minutes of Executive Committee meetings and of membership business meetings. A summary of business meeting minutes shall be published in the association journal as soon as feasible following each meeting. The secretary shall also preserve minutes of all meetings for five years and shall pass these on to the succeeding secretary.

E. The treasurer shall collect and manage association funds (including keeping accurate and current records of association income, assets, and expenses) so as to further association goals. As major instruments for achieving these goals, the association journal and newsletter shall receive priority in the expenditure of association funds. In addition, the treasurer shall maintain accurate and current membership lists and shall answer all queries regarding membership. The treasurer shall also make financial reports at Executive Committee meetings and at association business meetings. The association financial records shall be available to the Executive Committee upon request.

V. Officers -- Election.

A. Officers shall be elected from among current membership.

B. {Amended 2002} The slate of nominees for election shall be prepared by the Election Committee prior to the association's annual business meeting at the Native American Literature Symposium.

C. {Amended 2002} Election of officers shall be by secret ballot at the annual business meeting during the Native American Literature Symposium. However, in unusual and compelling circumstances, the Executive Committee may, with the approval of the members present at this meeting, choose to conduct the election by mail ballot.

D. Terms and Sequence of Elections

     1. The initial election officers shall be conducted as follows: In December, 1991, the president and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms; the vice-president and the secretary shall be elected to one year terms.

     2. Beginning with the elections of officers in December, 1992, the election sequence shall be as follows: The president and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms in odd-numbered years; the vice-president and the secretary shall be elected to two year terms in even-numbered years.

     3.{Amended 2002} Beginning with the elections of officers in March, 2004, the election sequence shall be as follows: the secretary and the treasurer shall be elected to two year terms in each odd-numbered year; the president shall automatically be succeeded by the vice-president, and a new vice-president elected, in each even-numbered year.

E. Neither the president nor the vice-president may be elected to consecutive terms.

VI. Executive Committee

A. The Executive Committee shall meet as often as feasible to conduct association business. In any event, the Committee shall meet at least once a year at the Modern Language Association convention and once prior to the business meeting at the association's own convention, if any.

B. {Amended 2004} The membership of the Executive Committee shall include the president, the vice-president, the secretary, the treasurer, the editor of the association journal, and the association historian.

C. The responsibilities of the Committee shall be:

     1. to further the goals of the organization;

     2. to initiate and supervise the services of the association;

     3. to approve the budget of the association and to supervise its expenditure and to act on proposals regarding dues structure and subscription rates for publications;

     4. to make recommendations to the membership, to act on recommendations by members, and to inform members of actions taken;

     5. to establish and discharge committees, either on recommendation of the membership or on its own initiative, and to designate their chairs;

     6. {Amended 2004} to oversee publications, media, and archives of the association, including appointing, assisting, and advising the editor of the association journal and the association historian;

     7. to plan conventions and other meetings of the association.

VII. Association Meetings.

A. {Amended 2002} The association shall hold business meetings during either the Native American Literature Symposium or its own convention, if any, and during the annual Modern Language Association convention.

B. The association shall hold conventions at times and places determined by the Executive Committee. In an emergency, the Executive Committee shall have the power to cancel a convention.

C. Conventions shall be planned by the Executive Committee with the advice of a program committee appointed by the Executive Committee.

D. Association sessions at the annual Modern Language Association convention shall be planned by session chairs appointed by the Executive Committee.

VIII. Amendments.

A. Proposals for amendments to these by-laws may be initiated by the Executive Committee or by any association member.

B. {Amended 2002} All amendments to be brought before the membership shall be published at least ninety days before the business meeting at which they are to be voted on or mailed to members at least thirty days before the business meeting.

C. Amendments must be approved by a majority of those voting at the business meeting. With the approval of those present at such a meeting, the Executive Committee may choose to conduct the voting among the entire membership by mail.

IX. Dissolution.

A. The association may be dissolved only by a vote of the members present at a special meeting called for that purpose.

B. On the dissolution of the association, all property remaining after the satisfaction of the association's obligations shall be distributed as the Executive Committee directs, choosing the recipients from non-profit Native American educational institutions whose goals are consistent with the interests of the association.

N.B. At the 12/29/90 business meeting, the membership directed the officers to proceed with incorporation. If the above document is passed by ASAIL members, the officers shall take such acceptance as authority to add to the by-laws immediately (without recourse to the above amending procedure) such language as incorporation may require.


APPENDIX D

Sample Membership Application



A S A I L
Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures
c/o Siobhan Senier
Dept of English
Univ of New Hampshire
Hamilton Smith Hall
95 Main St.
Durham NH 03824

Thank you for your interest in ASAIL. One of our primary purposes in the Association is to keep our members informed of recent publications and developments in the field of American Indian Literatures. ASAIL's dues-paying membership is open to all individuals and institutions interested in furthering the goals of the Association. Benefits of ASAIL membership include participation in the ASAIL electronic discussion group, voting privileges at the annual ASAIL meeting held during the MLA Convention, and a subscription to SAIL: Studies in American Indian Literatures. Published quarterly, SAIL is the only journal in the United States which focuses exclusively on American Indian literatures. With a wide scope of scholars and creative contributors, the journal is always on the cutting edge of activity in the field.

2006 Association membership rates are listed below.

Copies of the 1993 (v.5) through 2003 (v.15) volumes of SAIL are still available to individuals for $25 and to institutions for $35. For issues and volumes from 2004 onward, please contact University of Nebraska Press.


Please mail payment (in U.S. dollars only, please--check, money order, or cash are all acceptable) and this form to ASAIL Membership / c/o Siobhan Senier / Dept of English / Univ of New Hampshire / Hamilton Smith Hall / 95 Main St. / Durham NH 03824. Note: all checks and money orders must be made payable to "UNH."

ASAIL membership rates for 2006: (circle one)

REGULAR INDIVIDUAL

  $30 

LIMITED INCOME

   20

SPONSOR

   50 

PATRON

  100 

Overseas members: please add $20 for SAIL postage

BACK ISSUES: @ $25 each (individuals) / $35 each (institutions) (circle vol[s]. ordered):

 VOL.5 (1993)

 VOL.9  (1997)

VOL.13 (2001)

 VOL.6 (1994)

 VOL.10 (1998)

VOL.14 (2002)

 VOL.7 (1995)

 VOL.11 (1999)

VOL.15 (2003)

 VOL.8 (1996)

 VOL.12 (2000)

(For issues and volumes 2004 - , please contact University of Nebraska Press)

TOTAL ENCLOSED $___________

NAME__________________________________________________ PHONE___________________

MAILING ADDRESS_____________________________________________E-MAIL______________

CITY________________________________________STATE___________ZIPCO DE____________

(   ) Please check here to authorize us to add your email address to the ASAIL-L, a closed, moderated online discussion group restricted to ASAIL members and certain other invited guests.



 


1999 REPORT TO THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE
OF THE MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION
FOR RENEWAL OF ALLIED STATUS FOR THE
ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF
AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURES (ASAIL)



The members of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL), an allied organization of the Modern Language Association, petition the Program Committee of MLA to renew ASAIL's allied status.

I. HISTORY OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURES (ASAIL), 1972-1999.

Founded at the 1972 MLA Conference by Randall Ackly, Larry Evers, Wayne Franklin, Kenneth Roemer, Per Seyersted, and Leslie Silko, the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL) currently has more than 400 members, many of whom are actively involved in the work of the organization. During the past twenty-seven years, ASAIL has sponsored discussion panels, workshops, and readings which have attracted not only American Indian scholars and writers, but also a number of non-Native scholars as well. ASAIL has solicited proposals for these sessions through announcements in the MLA Newsletter and in ASAIL's two publications: Studies in American Indian Literatures (SAIL) and ASAIL Notes. At MLA 1998 in San Francisco, approximately 100 people attended a poetry reading sponsored by ASAIL. This reading, chaired by Ginny Carney, President of ASAIL, featured four West Coast Native poets: Gloria Bird (Spokane), Nora Dauenhauer (Tlingit), Janice Gould (Maidu), and Deborah Miranda (Ohlone/Costanoan). In fact, each year ASAIL-sponsored sessions draw enthusiastic crowds, after which ASAIL receives an average of 15-20 new requests for membership. [See Appendix A for a list of those elected to ASAIL's Executive Committee, 1980-1998, and Appendix B for a complete list of MLA Programs from 1980-1998.]

Thus, ASAIL's record of presenting well-organized and well-attended sessions at the annual MLA Conference alone merits continued allied status for the organization. Another impressive accomplishment, however, is its sponsorship of two longstanding publications: Studies in American Indian Literatures (SAIL) and ASAIL Notes. SAIL, the official journal of the association, is "the only scholarly journal in the United States that focuses exclusively on American Indian literatures. The journal publishes reviews, interviews, bibliographies, creative work, and scholarly, critical and theoretical articles on any aspect of Native American literatures, including traditional oral material in dual-language format or translation, written works, and live and media performances of verbal art." SAIL 9:3 (Fall 1997) also included an extensive "Guide to Native American Studies Programs in the United States and Canada," a primary resource for those seeking to teach or enroll in Native American Studies.

In its early stages, SAIL was edited briefly by Wayne Franklin (University of Iowa). The editorship moved to Karl Kroeber (Columbia University) who began the quarterly publication of the first series of Studies in American Indian Literatures in the Spring of 1977. Professor Kroeber continued to edit SAIL until 1987 when he published the last of the first series: Vol. 11, No. 2. Between 1987 and 1989, SAIL was published in two to three columns in Dispatch, a publication of a multicultural program at Columbia University. In 1989, under the leadership of the new editor, Helen Jaskoski (California State University, Fullerton), Studies in American Indian Literatures took on new life as Series 2. Dr. Jaskoski has assistance with the first two issues from Daniel Littlefield and James Parins (University of Arkansas, Little Rock), but at that time, Robert Nelson (University of Richmond) officially assumed the role of co-editor-- a position he continues to hold today. In 1992, Rodney Simard (UC, San Bernardino) took over as editor of SAIL when Helen Jaskoski was forced to resign, due to illness. In 1994, Professor Simard, too, fell ill, and John Lloyd Purdy (Western Washington University) was asked to serve as editor. Under the leadership of John Purdy and Robert Nelson, the journal--once a staple-bound publication of 36 pages, with no more than 40 subscribers--now has a mailing list of 400+ subscribers, representing more than a dozen foreign countries, as well as almost every state in the USA.

Another publication, ASAIL Notes, was initiated in January 1973 as the ASAIL Newsletter. Four issues followed, and in 1984, Andrew Wiget (New Mexico State University) became editor of this quarterly newsletter which served as a medium of information and scholarly resources for teachers and students of Native American literature. In 1987, John Lloyd Purdy took over as editor of ASAIL Notes and continued in that role until 1994, when he became editor of SAIL. At that time, Michael Wilson (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee) took over. In 1997, Scott Stevens (Arizona State University) agreed to edit ASAIL Notes, and currently, more than 600 copies are mailed out to subscribers, special programs, libraries, and other interested individuals.

As an allied organization of MLA, the Association for the Study of American Literatures often collaborates with the American Indian Literatures Discussion Group, coordinating our panel sessions with theirs and holding a joint business meeting each year during the MLA Conference. Additionally, members of ASAIL coordinate their efforts with, and participate in, the activities of the Committee on the Literatures and Languages of America.



II. ONGOING ACTIVITY

Since its inception in 1972, ASAIL has actively and continuously participated in regional and national MLA conferences [see Appendix B for ASAIL-sponsored MLA programs from 1980-1998]. In order to reach a diverse audience, official communications and Calls for Papers are mailed to individuals and institutions, as well as announced in the MLA Newsletter, ASAIL's two publications, and the ASAIL website.

Furthermore, ASAIL has an active history of publications. Series I of the official journal of the association, Studies in American Indian Literatures (SAIL), was published from 1977-1987, and SAIL, Series 2, has been published regularly since 1989. ASAIL Notes, the association newsletter, has been published regularly since 1987. Additionally, a website, maintained by Robert Nelson (University of Richmond) can be accessed at [/faculty/asail] providing information on ASAIL, subscription forms, and a guide to Native American Studies programs in the United States and Canada.

III. DIVERSE PARTICIPATION IN ASAIL ACTIVITIES

The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures has actively encouraged participation from scholars and writers from various disciplines, and from non-Native as well as Native backgrounds. ASAIL has emphasized the importance of involving American Indian, Alaska Native, and First Nation scholars in every aspect of the organization, and at the 1998 MLA Conference in San Francisco, six presenters/poetry readers, from a total of sixteen participants in ASAIL sessions, were tribally affiliated Natives. As noted above, ASAIL organized a well-attended Poetry Reading by West Coast Native women at MLA 1998, and plans for the 1999 MLA Conference in Chicago include a session devoted to literature published in indigenous languages, organized by Joanne DiNova (Ojibwa), University of Waterloo, Ontario, and a session on teaching American Indian literature, which will be chaired by Ginny Carney (Cherokee), University of Kentucky.

In addition to encouraging participation by American Indians/First Nation/Alaska Native scholars, ASAIL has actively involved distinguished non-Native scholars such as Helen Jaskoski, Karl Kroeber, Arnold Krupat, Ken Roemer, and LaVonne Ruoff in the ongoing work of the organization. Our policy has been to advertise Calls for Papers in Studies in American Indian Literatures, ASAIL Notes, and the MLA Newsletter so that a broad spectrum of creative writers and scholars, including departments other than English, are encouraged to participate in ASAIL activities.



IV. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures was founded in 1972.

The purpose of the organization shall be to promote study, criticism, and research on the oral traditions and literatures of Native Americans; to promote the teaching of such traditions and literatures, and to support and encourage contemporary Native American writers and the continuity of Native American oral traditions.



V. ASAIL' S BYLAWS

Please see Appendix C for ASAIL's bylaws, which were revised and approved by ASAIL membership in March 1991.



VI. CURRENT MEMBERSHIP

ASAIL currently has over 400 members, including scholars from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, and Norway as well as from the United States. Please see Appendix D for a sample membership application.

VII. DESCRIPTION OF DUES STRUCTURE

ASAIL maintains five categories of membership:

Individual membership:              $ 25
Institutional membership:           $ 35
Limited income membership:     $ 16
Sponsor:                                   $ 50
Patron:                                     $100

Benefits of ASAIL membership include subscriptions to SAIL and the newsletter ASAIL Notes; donations at the Sponsor and Patron level are acknowledged in the concurrent volume of SAIL.



Respectfully submitted,
Ginny Carney, President (1998-99)
Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures (ASAIL)

 


MLA Programs Arranged by the
Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures

1980 - 2013



2013
Native American Literature, Indigenous Scientific Knowledge, and Environmental Justice. Presiding: Janis A. Johnson, U of Idaho
1. "The Epistemlogical Consequences of Indigenous Ecopoetics in the Work of Simon J. Ortiz, Robert J. Conley, and Leslie Marmon Silko," Susan Berry Brill de Ramírez, Bradley U
2. "Mapping a Haunted Landscape," Janet Fiskio, Oberlin C
3. "Birch Bark Paper and Simon Pokagon's Ecological Media," Jonathan Senchyne, U of Wisconsin Madison
4. "Ten Years after American Indian Literature, Environmental Justice, and Ecocriticism: New Directions on Global Indigenous Literary Studies," Joni Adamson, Arizona State U

New Native Writers. Presiding: Ryan Winn, C of Menominee Nation

  1. "Lukfi Humma' Taloa Ikbi (Red Dirt Poets): Regionality and Indigenous Presence in Jeanetta Calhoun Mish and Phillip Carroll Morgan." L. Rain C. Goméz
  2. "Mysteries, Stories, and Histories: Time, Truth, and Identity in Elsie's Business," Jessica Burstrem, U of Arizona
  3. "Wrestling with the Novel in Stephen Graham Jones's Ledfeather," Channette Romero, U of Georgia
  4. "Osage Posthumanism and Daniel Wilson's Robopocalypse," Brian Hudson, U of Oklahoma



2012
Intersections between American Indian and Other Literary Traditions. Presiding: Tereza M. Szeghi, U of Dayton

  1. "Bearing Witness to the Self and the Community: Testimonial Works by Indigenous Peoples in the Americas," Laura J. Beard, Texas Tech U
  2. "Anthropocentric Ecologies and the 'Ecological Native': Paradoxes of Environmental Conservation in American Indian, Maori, and Aboriginal Taiwanese Literatures," Karen Thornber, Harvard U
  3. "From Joaquín Murieta to Machete: 160 Years of Violence, Sex, and History," Maria Windell, Wake Forest U

American Indian Theater. Presiding: Ryan Winn, C of Menominee Nation

  1. "Pow-Wowing the Stage: Hanay Geiogamah's Subversive Comedy," John Wharton Lowe, Louisiana S. U.
  2. "Survivance in Diane Glancy's The Woman Who Was a Red Deer Dressed for the Deer Dance," James K. Ruppert, U of Alaska, Fairbanks
  3. "The Indigenous Female Speaker: Monologue Form in Contemporary Native American Drama," Nicole Tabor, Moravian C
  4. "'Frybread Is a Fabricated Identifier': Colonization, Historical Trauma, and Healing in The Frybread Queen," Patrice E. M. Hollrah, U of Nevada. Las Vegas



2011
Contemporary First Nations Literature. Presiding: Nartha L. Viehmann, Xavier U

  1. "Photos, Dream Catchers, and Decaffeinated Coffee: Staging the Abstract within the Concrete in Drew Hayden Taylor's Identity-Politics Trilogy," Ryan Winn, C of Menominee Nation
  2. "(re)Narrating the Self: The Subject-Making Functions of 'I Am' Declarations in Daniel David Moses's Almighty Voice and His Wife," Kailin Wright, U of Toronto
  3. "From 'The Long Walk' to 'The Stroll': Racializing Mobility in Indigenous Writig," Deena Rymhs, U of British Columbia

Poetic Visions and Revisions. Presiding: Kathleen G. Washburn, U of New Mexico

  1. "Vision Written in Gasoline: M. L. Smoker's 'The Necessary Bullet,'" Merrill Cole, Western Illinois U
  2. "'Carriers of Our Stories and Histories': Diane Glancy's Poetic-Performative Praxis," Jaye T. Darby, U of California, Los Angeles
  3. "Contemporary Maya Literature andthe Question of Modernity: Pablo Garcia's Bixonik tzij kech jukulaj kaminaqib: Xibalba as Allegory of Decolonization," Emilio Del Valle-Escalante, U of North Caroline, Chapel Hill
  4. "'Carried in the Arms of Standing Waves': The Transpacific Poetics of Nora Marks Dauenhauer," Billy J. Stratton, Bowling Green S. U.



2009
Teaching Contemporary American Indian Literatures. Presiding: Joseph Bauerkemper, U of California, Los Angeles

  1. "Sherman Alexie's Pawnshop Theory," Paul B. Downes, U of Ontario
  2. "'Everything One Wouldn't Expect': Teaching Historically Situated Native Drama," Katherine L. Y. Evans, U of Texas, Austin
  3. "Magical Realism and Magical Words in Contemporary American Indian Novels: Teaching Language's Power to Reveal and Transform What Is Real," James Ottery, U of Illinois, Springfield
  4. "Dream Hunting: Tracking Big Game in the 1634 Relation of Paul de Jeune and Louise Erdrich's Tracks," Andrew Lopenzina, Sam Houston S. U.

Teaching Early Native American Literatures. Presiding: James K. Ruppert, U of Alaska, Fairbanks

  1. "Teaching from the Archive: Early Native Nonfiction Writing," Stephanie J. Fitzgerald, U of Kansas
  2. "'Now Woe! He Gives Off Smoke!': Comparing Representations of Conquest in the Aztec Water-Pouring Song and Sor Juana Inés de la Cuz's Loa to The Divine Narcissus," Tamara Maureen Harvey, George Mason U
  3. "Surveying Indian Literatures; or, Incorporating Native Literature into United States Survey Courses," Martha L. Viehmann, Xavier U



2008
Indigenous Aesthetics. Presiding: Susan Berry Brill de Ramírez, Bradley Univ.

  1. "Between Image and the Text: Shelley Niro's The Shirt and the Cinematogaphic Art of Intervention," Monika Siebert Wadman, Syracuse U
  2. "Tomson Highway's Indigenization of Western Tragicomedy and Literary Theory," Jesse Archibald-Barber, First Nations Univ. of Canada
  3. "A Literary Happening: Sam Durant's Multimedia Direction through Indirection," Mary Godwin, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette
  4. "Aesthetics as Intervention: The Native Manifesto Tradition and the Politics of Representation," Matthew Hooley, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison
    Respondent: Sean Teuton, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

Digital NDNs: Pedagogies for American Indian Writing and Literature in the Twenty-First Century. Presiding: Malea D. Powell, Michigan State Univ.

  1. "Digitizing Silko's Ceremony: Helping Twenty-First-Century Students Understand American Indian Literature," Rick Mott, Eastern Kentucky Univ.
  2. "Expand and Contract: E-Learning Shapes the World of American Indian Literature in Cyprus and California," Nancy Strow Sheley, California State Univ., Long Beach; Carol Zitzer-Comfort, California State Univ., Long Beach
  3. "Mapping Native Space," Lisa Brooks, Harvard Univ.



2007
Native Visions: Approaches to Teaching First Nations / Native American Film. Presiding: Beth H. Piatote, UC Berkeley

  1. "Between Image and the Text: Shelley Niro's The Shirt and the Cinematogaphic Art of Intervention," Monika Siebert Wadman, Syracuse U
  2. "Four Minutes That Last: Hulleah J. Tinhnahjinnie's Aboriginal World View," Joseph Bauerkemper, U of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  3. "Condolence and Haudenosaunee Critical Theory: Intersections of It Starts with a Whisper (1993) and Mohawk Girls (2005)," Penelope M. Kelsey, Western Illinois U

The Big Three-Oh: Studies in American Indian Literatures Special Anniversary Session. Presiding: Malea D. Powell, Michigan State U
Speakers: James H. Cox, U of Texas, Austin; Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto; Malea D. Powell; A. LaVonne Brown Ruoff, U of Illinois, Chicago



2006
American Indian Literatures in Global Contexts. Presiding: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State U

  1. "Sacred Water: Leslie Marmon Silko and the Water Wars," Anthony Lioi, Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.
  2. "Becoming a Citizen of the World: Gerald Vizenor and the Age of Globalization," Linda Lizut Helstern, North Dakota State U
  3. "Native Border Writing and Global American Indian Studies," Claudia Sadowski-Smith, Arizona State U

Teaching the American Indian Boarding School Experience. Presiding: Deborah A. Miranda, Washington and Lee U

  1. "Teaching Luther Standing Bear's My People the Sioux with the Carlisle Indian School Newspapers," Jessica R. Mathews, George Mason U
  2. "I Have Been Taught Not to Remember: Kiowa Boarding School Stories in the Plays of N. Scot Momaday and Hanay Geiogamah," Susan Scarberry-García, Arizona State U
  3. "Connecting Students to Zitkala-Sa: From Her School Days to Theirs," Julianne Newmark, U of New Mexico



2005
Broadening the Conversation: Teaching beyond the Canonical Native Writers. Presiding: Debra K.S. Barker, U of Wisconsin, Eau Claire; Connie Augustine Jacobs, San Juan College
Speakers: Granville Ganter, Saint John's U, NY; Virginia Kennedy, U of Scranton; Siobhan Senier, U of New Hampshire, Durham; Kenneth Morrison Roemer, U of Texas, Arlington; James K. Ruppert, U of Alaska, Fairbanks

Ethics and American Indian Cultures. Presiding: Christina A. Roberts, U of Arizona

  1. "'Nobody Wants to Hear These Things': Academic Freedom and Ethics in Teaching Sherman Alexie's 'Can I Get a Witness?,'" Patrice E. M. Hollrah, U of Nevada, Las Vegas
  2. "Modes of Ethnographic and Ethical Inquiry in Teaching American Indian Texts," Karen Lee Osborne, Columbia College, IL
  3. Creating Ethical Learning Communities," Laura J. Beard, Texas Tech U



2004
Problems in Applying Feminist Theory to Native American Literature. Presiding: Patrice E.M. Hollrah, U of Nevada, Las Vegas

  1. "Navajo Womanhood in Luci Tapahonso's 'Blue Horses Rush In,'" Tereza M. Szeghi, U of Arizona
  2. "Ignatia Broker's Lived Feminism: Toward a Native Women's Theory," Molly McGlennen, U of California, Davis
  3. "Feminism, Nation, and the Fourth World: A Comparative Approach to Indigenous American Women's Writing," Janet McAdams, Kenyon College

American Indian Literature and Visual Culture. Presiding: Dean Rader, U of San Francisco

  1. "Speaking Chinook: Multicultural Images in the Self-Representations and Pacific Coast Stories of E. Pauline Johnson," Martha L. Viehmann, Northern Kentucky U
  2. "Liberating Words: Texts and Contexts in Edgar Heap of Bird's 'Wheel,'" Robert A. Warrior, U of Oklahoma
  3. "Claiming Another Homeland: Native Novelists and Visual Artists Look to Europe," Lee F. Schweninger, U of North Carolina, Wilmington
  4. "Cinema and Poetry: Sherwin Bitsui's Intertexual Performance," Angelica M. Lawson, Dartmouth College



2003
Opening Our Canon: Teaching Lesser-Known Native Writers. Presiding: Virginia I. Carney, Leech Lake Tribal College

  1. "Land Speaking in Whispers: Jeanette Armstrong's Indigenist Fiction," Joanne R. DiNova, Corunna, Ontario
  2. "Esther Belin and Laura Tohe: Urban and Traditional Diné (Navajo) Poetry," P. Jane Hafen, U of Nevada, Las Vegas
  3. "Teaching LeAnne Howe's Shellshaker with a Tribalography Approach," Patrice E.M. Hollrah, U of Nevada, Las Vegas

"The Dirt Is Red Here": Literature and Art of Native California. Presiding: Deborah A. Miranda, Pacific Lutheran U
Speakers: Greg Sarris, Loyola Marymount U; Sylvia Ross, Lemon Grove, CA; L. Frank Manriquez, Sebastopol, CA; Frank LaPena, California State U, Sacramento



2002
Native Literature in Native Classrooms: The Challenge of Teaching in a Tribal College. Presiding: Patrice E.M. Hollrah, U of Nevada, Las Vegas

  1. "Higher Education and the Ancient Knowledge of the Ojibway," Michael W. price, Red Lake Nation College
  2. "The Best of Times, the Worst of Times: The Challenge of Teaching in a Tribal College," Virginia I. Carney, Leech Lake Tribal College

Constructing Indigenous Consciousness in Colonizing Languages. Presiding: Daniel Heath Justice, U of Toronto

  1. "Speaking for Ourselves," Simon J. Ortiz, U of Toronto
  2. "Languages of the Indigenous Web," David A. Golumbia, Long Beach, CA
  3. "Evidence of Indigenous Consciousness in a Colonizing Language: Resilience and Resistance in the Poetry of Ofelia Zepeda," Angelica M. Lawson, U of Arizona
  4. "Lost in Translation: Expressing Haida Ideology in English," Frederick White, Slippery Rock U



2001
Teaching American Indian Literatures in Multicultural Contexts. Presiding: Eric Gary Anderson

  1. "'Remember, We Are Dancing a Revolution': A Nonutopic Approach to Teaching Multiculturalism." Timothy Burgess Powell, U of Georgia
  2. "Dances with Poles: Teaching American Indian Literatures to Eastern Europeans; or, A Survival Manual for Cultural Critique outside of the Americans." Alexia Kosmider, U of Rhode Island
  3. "Two Indians: A Comparative Approach to Teaching American Indian and South Asian American Literature in the Multiethnic Classroom." Karen M. Cardozo-Kane, U of Massachusetts, Amherst

American Indian Protest Literatures. Presiding: Malea D. Powell, U of Nebraska, Lincoln

  1. "The Good, the Bad, and Elias Boudinot: Bringing the Literatures of American Indian Protest and Accommodation into Dialogue." Stephen J. Brandon, U of North Carolina, Greensboro
  2. "'Remember Wounded Knee': The American Indian Movement and Twenty-First Century Protest." Elizabeth Mary Rich, Saginaw Valley State U
  3. "Heartspeak from the Spirit: John Trudell's Message of Resistance." Kim Lee, U of Nebraska, Lincoln
  4. "Indigenous Reading, Sovereign Theory." Chadwick Allem, Ohio State U, Columbus



2000
Uncanonized American Indian and First Nations Writers. Presiding: Malea D. Powell, U of Nebraska, Lincoln

  1. "Raven and the American Dream: Robert Davis and Tlingit Poetics." Susan Elizabeth Kollen, Montana State U, Bozeman
  2. "'Mother of U.S. Senator an Indian Queen': Cultural Challenge and Appropriation in The Memoirs of Narcissa Owens," Stephen J. Brandon, U of North Carolina, Greensboro
  3. "Claiming a Voice: Shirley Sterling's My Name Is Sepeetza." Laura J. Beard, Universidad de las Americas, Puebla
  4. "The Creation of Deviance: Janet Hale's The Jailing of Cecilia Capture." Sandra K. Baringer, U of California, Riverside

Teaching Native American Literature from an Indigenous Perspective. Presiding: Joanne R. DiNova, U of Waterloo

  1. "Introducing Alaska Naitve Oral Literatures: A Haida Raven Story." Jeane Breinig, U of Alaska, Anchorage
  2. "'So Where's Your Headdress?': Teaching against Stereotypes in the Native Lit Classroom." Daniel H. Justice, U of Nebraska, Lincoln
  3. "Teaching American Indian Literature to American Indian Students." Joyzelle Godfrey, Lower Brule Community College, SD

 1999
North American Literature in Indigenous Languages. Presiding: Joanne DiNova, U of Waterloo

  1. "The Joys and Sorrows of Talking on the Page." Nora Marks Dauenhauer, Sealaska Corporation, Juneau, AK
  2. "Naming Metaphor: Who Defines Raven in Native Literature?" Lee Maracle, U of Toronto

Teaching Native American Literature from an Indigenous Perspective. Presiding: Ginny Carney, Eastern Kentucky U

  1. "Teaching Tribal Sovereignty or Colonial Identity: Advocacy and the Politics of Complexity." David L. Moore, U of Montana

Reception in Honor of Karl Kroeber. Speakers: A. LaVonne Brown Ruoff,. Univ of Illinois, Chicago; Gene U. Ruoff, U of Illinois, Chicago; Robert M. Nelson, U of Richmond.



 1998
Indigenous Feminisms: Native Women Writers. Presiding: Susan B. Brill, Bradley U

  1. "The Understatement of Resistance: Resistance as a Literary Strategy in Fiction by Debra Earling and Elizabeth Cook-Lynn," Gloria Bird, Salish-Kootenai College, Spokane Tribal Campus
  2. "Alaskan Haida Women's Writings: Oral Strategies, Tribal Perspectives, and Written Forms," Jeane Coburn Breinig, U of Alaska Anchorage
  3. "A Critical Center: White Earth and Her Women Writers," Christopher LaLonde, North Carolina Wesleyan College

Indigenous Texts in Colonial and Postcolonial Contexts. Presiding: Chadwick Allen, Ohio State U, Columbus

  1. "Unnatural Boundaries: Mixed-Bloods, Mestizas, and Metaphors of Indigenous Identity," Alesia Garcia, DePaul U
  2. "Antitourism and Authenticity in Postcolonial Pacific Writing," Paul Lyons, U of Hawaii, Manoa
  3. "In Black and White but Red All Over: William Apess and Radical Indians," Randall Brent Moon, U of California, Riverside



1997
To Celebrate Canada's First Nations: A Reading by Thomas King. Presiding: Susan Scarberry-Garcia, Navajo Preparatory School

Joint Business Meeting of the Division on American Indian Literatures and the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. Presiding: Susan Scarberry-Garcia, Navajo Preparatory School, and Alanna Brown, Montana State U



1996
Performance of The Star Quilter, a One-Act Play by William Yellow Robe, Jr. Presiding: Gloria Bird, Institute of American Indian Arts

Convergencies/Divergencies: The Making of Worlds in American Indian Poetry. Presiding: Janice Gould, U of New Mexico

  1. "Convergent Worlds: Carter Revard's Unzipping Angels," Janet McAdams, Emory U
  2. "Wendy Rose for the Year 2000: Preparing the Way to Our New World," Maureen Salzer, U of Arizona
  3. "Mary Tall Mountain: Bringing Worlds Together," Gabrielle Welford, U of Hawaii, Manoa



1995
Identity and Intentionality: Native Language Presence in Contemporary Texts. Presiding: Frederick H. White, Azusa Pacific U

  1. "'Ark' Idaa Jini: Conversive Language Use in Contemporary Navajo Poetry," Susan B. Brill, Bradley U
  2. "'I'll Talk Indian': The Addition of Ojibwa Language and Mythology in Erdrich's Love Medicine," Karah Stokes, U of Miami
  3. "Louise Erdrich's Tracks: Anishinabe Storytelling," Niki Lee Manos, Marymount College, NY
  4. "A Native American Aesthetic Approach to Native Language Texts: An Introduction to the Dauenhauers' Haa Shuka, Our Ancestors: Tlingit Oral Narratives," Gloria Bird, Institute of American Indian Arts

Regionalism in American Indian Literature. Presiding: Melissa Hearn, Northern Michigan U

  1. "Nature and the Land in Pauline Johnson's The Moccasin Maker," Lee Schweninger, U of North Carolina, Wilmington
  2. "Anishinaabe Tradition versus Anglo-American Law in Gerald Vizenor's Heirs of Columbus," Stephen Osborne, U of California, Los Angeles



1994
Return to Native Languages. Presiding: Fred H. White, U of California, Los Angeles

  1. "Ojibwa Language Renewal," Jillian M. Berkland, U of California, Los Angeles
  2. "Reclaiming Language: Reclaiming Identity," Jeane Breinig, U of Washington
  3. "Oicimani Mitawa: My Journey," Gwen Griffin, Mankato State U

American Indian Literature in the Curriculum: Strategies and Resources. Presiding: Kathryn W. Shanley, Cornell U
     Speakers: LaVonne Brown Ruoff, U of Illinois, Chicago; James K. Ruppert, U of Alaska Fairbanks; Kathryn W. Shanley



1993
Intellectual Property Rights in Native North America: Whose Story Is This Anyway? Presiding: David L. Moore, Cornell U

  1. "Native American Ethnobiography and 'Authorship': Legal and Ethical Issues," Lenora Ledwon, U of Notre Dame
  2. "Collaboration and the Complex World of Literary Rights," Alanna Brown, Montana State U
  3. "Imagination, Conversation, and Trickster Discourse: Negotiating an Approach to Native American Literature," Paul L. Tidwell, U of New Mexico

Film and Theater in Native North America. Presiding: James Ruppert, U of Alaska Fairbanks

  1. "The Booger Dance: Representations of the Other in Native Theater," Robert Appleford, U of Toronto, St. George Campus
  2. "Hollywood Paradigm and Cultural Stereotype: 'Captain Jack,' the Modoc 'Wars,' Drum Beat, and Indians in Mid-Century Film," Rodney Simard, California State U, San Bernardino
  3. "Mythic Persona and Realistic Representation in Vizenor's Harold of Orange," James Ruppert



1992
Gender and Gay and Lesbian Studies in Native American Literature. Presiding: Gretchen Ronnow, Wayne State College

  1. "Gender Construction in Early Literary and Political Discourses of Native American Women," Carol Batker, U of Massachusetts, Amherst
  2. "Masculinity, Self-Performance, and Representation: The Gendering of Black Hawk," Timothy Sweet, West Virginia U
  3. "Disobedience (in Language) in Texts by Lesbian Native Americans," Janice Gould, U of New Mexico
  4. "Gender Construction and Family Dissolution in Louise Erdrich's The Beet Queen," Louise Flavin, U of Cincinnati

Literature in Native Languages. Presiding: Luci Tapahonso, U of Kansas

  1. "Pulling Down the Clouds: Some Words on Thoughts about Rain," Ofelia Zepeda, U of Arizona
  2. "Writing within Hozho: The Navajo Process of Creation," Laura Tohe, U of Nebraska Lincoln
  3. "Deer Women and Elk Men: The Lakota Narratives of Ella Deloria," Julian Rice, Florida Atlantic U



1991
"Authenticity" and Authorship: Tracking Signs in Native American Texts. Presiding: John Purdy, Western Washington U

  1. "Looking Through the Glass Darkly: The Editorialization of Mourning Dove," Alanna Brown, Montana State U
  2. "The Indian and the Audience: Native American Identity and the Literary Canon(s)," Rodney Simard, California State U, San Bernardino
  3. "Tracking the Truth in Black Hawk's Autobiography," Ruth Burridge Lindemann, U of Illinois, Urbana
  4. "Storytelling: Tradition and Preservation in Erdrich's Tracks," Jennifer Sergi, U of Rhode Island

Kashaya-Pomo Texts: Women Talking Stories. Presiding: Greg Sarris, U of California, Los Angeles
     Speakers: Anita Silva, Sonoma County Indian Health Center; Violet Chappell, Kashaya-Pomo Reservation; Vanna Lawson, Santa Rosa CA



1990
The Other Captives: American Indian Oral Captivity Narratives. Presiding: Peter G. Beidler, Lehigh U

  1. "Indians as Captives within a Dominant Religious System," Greg Sarris, U of California, Los Angeles
  2. "Indians as Captives within a Dominant Educational System," Andrea Lerner, U of Arizona
  3. "Indians as Captives within a Dominant Political System," Edward D. Castillo, Sonoma State U

From the Heart of Indian Country: Oral and Written Art in Contemporary Native American Communities. Presiding: Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati

  1. "I Am Not Anything Today. Tomorrow I Will Be Klamath: Tnbal Program in Language, Literacy, and Literature," Andrea Lerner, U of Arizona
  2. "He's Got Me All Taped Up: Native Language Awareness and Transmission among the Southern Paiute," Gretchen Ronnow, U of Arizona
  3. "Tribal Cultural Conservation Work at Zuni," Andrew Wiget, New Mexico State U



1989
Reconstructive Encounters: American Indian Literatures and American Classics. Presiding: Kenneth M. Roemer, U of Texas, Arlington

  1. "Geographies of Literature, Literatures of Geography," Kathryn Shanley Vangen, U of Washington
  2. "Mark Twain and the 'Real' Indians: Huck and Jim in the Territories," Carter Revard, Washington U
  3. "In Sickness and in Health," Paul Lauter, Trinity College, CT

Encounters in the Oral Tradition: Native American Stories of Cultural Contact. Presiding: Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati

  1. "The Russians are Coming, the Russians are Dead: Mvth and History in First Contact Narratives of the Ahtna Indians," James Ruppert, U of Alaska Fairbanks
  2. "Conversations with Mabel McKay: Story as Contact, Contact as Story," Greg Sarris, U of California, Los Angeles
  3. "Plains Indian Names and Autobiography: The Onomastic Construction of the Self." Hertha Wong, California State U, Chico



1988
American Indian Women: Voices Past and Present. Presiding: Gretchen Bataille, Arizona State U

  1. "Coyote, She Was Going There: Prowling for Hypotheses about the Female Native American Trickster," Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati
  2. "'All Them Laguna Intersections!' Laguna in the Work of Paula Gunn Allen and Leslie Marmon Silko," Patricia Clark Smith, U of New Mexico
  3. "The Songs We Sing: The Venerable Lyrics of Navajo Women's Contemporary Songs," Luci Tapahonso, U of New Mexico

American Indian Video Art. Presiding: James Ruppert, U of Alaska Fairbanks

  1. "The Writer and the Community: Working on 'Origin of the Crown Dance,'" Joy Harjo, U of Arizona
  2. "Cultural Contexts: Seeing with a Native Eye," Kathleen Sands, Arizona State U
  3. "The Trickster Figure in Harold of Orange," Alan Velie, U of Oklahoma



1987
American Indian Literatures. Presiding: James W. Parins, U of Arkansas, Little Rock

  1. "Frost and Ortiz, Stevens and Erdrich, Sexton and Rose: How to Teach Native (and Immigrant) American Literature," Carter Revard, Washington U
  2. "Charles Alexander Eastman's Literary Boundary Culture," Hertha D. Wong, California State U, Chico

Directions of American Indian Literatures. Presiding: Kathleen Sands, Arizona State U

  1. "A Religious-Studies Approach," Kenneth Morrison, Dept. of Religion, Arizona State U
  2. "A Historical Approach," Clara Sue Kidwell, Dept. of History, U of California, Berkeley
  3. "A Linguistic Approach," Ofelia Zepeda, U of Arizona



1986
Native American Oral Texts: Interpretations and Transcriptions. Presiding: Paul Zolbrod

  1. "Transcription, Interpretation, and Translation: The View from Native South America," Joel Sherzer, U of Texas, Austin
  2. "Issues of Interpretation: Song of the Sky," Brian Swann, Cooper Union
         Respondent: Larry Evers, U of Arizona

Native American Poetry, Song, and Short Fiction. Presiding: Daniel F. Littlefield, U of Arkansas, Little Rock

  1. "The Telling That Continues: Oral Tradition in Leslie Marmon Silko's Storyteller," Bernard Hirsch, U of Kansas
  2. "Simon Ortiz: The Poet and His Landscape," William Oandasan, U of California, Los Angeles
  3. "Singer of the Semiotics of Power: John Milton Oskison," Gretchen Ronnow, U of Arizona



1985
Teaching Native American Oral Literatures: A Workshop. Presiding: Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati
     Speakers: Elaine Jahner, Dartmouth College; Janice Grow-Maienza, St. Mary's College; LaVonne Ruoff; U of Illinois, Chicago; Andrew O. Wiget, New Mexico State U

Native American Writers and the American Literary Traditions. Presiding: Susan Scarberry-Garcia, Colorado College

  1. "Nights with Uncle Remus; Nights with Uncle Ti-Aut-Ley," James W. Parins and Daniel F. Littlefield, Jr., U of Arkansas, Little Rock
  2. "Momaday's Autobiographies and the History of American Indian Autobiography," David Brumble, U of Pittsburgh
  3. "The American Landscape: Momaday's The Way to Rainy Mountain and the Anglo-American Search for the Garden," J. Frank Papovich, Hampden-Sydney College



1984
Themes and Motifs in American Indian Literatures. Presiding: Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati

  1. "The Theft-of-Fire Motif in American Indian Oral Literatures," Kathleen Costanzo, Polk Community College
  2. "Traditional Narratives of the Southern New England Indians," Philomene Ducas, Eastern Connecticut State U
  3. "Sacred Reversals: Trickster and the Sacred Clown in Gerald Vizenor's Earthdivers and Darkness in Saint Louis Bearheart," Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati

Oral Literature and the Problematics of Textuality. Presiding: Andrew Wiget, New Mexico State U

  1. "Text and Pretext: Ideological Assumptions in the Representations of Oral Literature," Andrew Wiget, New Mexico State U
  2. "Textuality in Oral Performance: A Story of the Kuna Indians of Panama," Joel Sherzer, U of Texas, Austin
  3. "Crossing the Divide: Linguistic Text to Literary Idiom," Brian Swann, Cooper Union
  4. "Poststructuralism and Oral Literature," Arnold Krupat, Sarah Lawrence College



1983
American Indian Literature and the American Literary Canon. Presiding: Elaine Jahner, U of Nebraska, Lincoln
     Speakers: Roy Harvey Pearce, U of California, San Diego; Paula Gunn Allen, U of California, Berkeley; Arnold Krupat, Sarah Lawrence College

Comparative Studies of American Indian and Other American Literatures. Presiding: Elaine Jahner, U of Nebraska, Lincoln

  1. "Native American Literature within the Context of a Visionary American Literature," Norma Wilson, U of South Dakota
  2. "Romance and Resolution: American Mainstream and Indian Literature Compared," Keith Morton, U of Minnesota
  3. "The Confessional Form in American Indian Literature," David Brumble, U of Pittsburgh
  4. "Little Jack and the Seven-Headed Dragon," Jarold Ramsey, U of Rochester



1982
Verbal Art, Visual Art, and American Indian Literature. Presiding: Larry Evers, U of Arizona
     Speakers: Wendy Rose, U of California, Berkeley; Leslie Marmon Silko, U of Arizona

Teaching American Indian Literature. Presiding: Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati

  1. "Teaching American Indian Women's Literature," Paula Gunn Allen, U of California, Los Angeles
  2. "Emphasizing Literature in American Indian Literature Courses," Franchot Ballinger, U of Cincinnati
  3. "A Native American Literature Course by Correspondence Study," Joseph DeFlyer and Robert W. Lewis, U of North Dakota
  4. "American Indian Literature Syllabi: The Oral Experience, Written Literature, the Indian in Western Thought," R.D. Theisz, Black Hills State College



1981
The Traditional Native Text in Process: Transcription, Translation, Presentation, and Interpretation. Presiding: Jarold Ramsey, U of Rochester
     Participants: Joel Sherzer, U of Texas, Austin; Dell Hymes, Univ. of Pennsylvania



1980
Native American Oral Literatures: The Power of the Word. Presiding: LaVonne Brown Ruoff, U of Illinois, Chicago

  1. "The Ecological Imagination in a Wasco Chinookan Story," Jarold Ramsey, U of Rochester
  2. "Spirit Song: A Healing Force," Susan Scarberry, U of Denver
  3. "Winnebago Oral Tradition: Ceremony and the Arts," Woesha Cloud North, U of Nebraska, Lincoln






2012 ASAIL Business Meeting
Native American Literature Symposium, Isleta NM
Saturday, March 31, 2012, 3 p.m.



OPENING REMARKS

Jodi Byrd opened by this is the last ASAIL business meeting she will officiate as ASAIL President, as her term is concluding. Margaret Noori, the incoming President of ASAIL, could not be with us today. Jodi noted that she intends to will help Margaret as she transitions into the position, just as Patrice Hollrah helped Jodi (for which Jodi thanked Patrice).

Jodi then introduced the board members who were present: herself, Robert Nelson (historian), Patrice Hollrah, Tereza Szeghi (secretary). Unfortunately Jeff Berglund (treasurer) had to leave the conference prior to the meeting.





BUSINESS ITEMS

1) Emerging Scholars Professional Development Scholarships: Jodi reminded everyone that there is money available but that it has underutilized to date. Proposals should be sent to Meg now, not Jodi.

2) Treasurer's report (Jeff Berglund, in absentia): 138 paid members of ASAIL currently; 209 at the end of 2011, 159 the year before that. In short, although our membership is down, in the long view the numbers are not markedly below previous precedent. Everyone is encouraged to renew their memberships and to do so using PayPal through the new ASAIL website that Christina Roberts designed for our organization (for which Jodi thanked Christina).

Our current expenses as an organization include the emerging scholars professional development fund, support of one of the breaks at the Native American Literature Symposium, and payment to the University of Nebraska Press associated with the publication of Studies in American Indian Literatures.

3) Proposed affiliations with other organizations
Tereza Szeghi noted that two organizations, the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) and the Western Literature Association (WLA) have communicated a desire to affiliate with ASAIL during the last year. The nature of these affiliations would be different, as ASLE seeks an official affiliation that, among other things, involves each organization guaranteeing a panel at its regularly scheduled meeting to the other organization. Affiliation with ASLE would also allow us to post news about our organization in their newsletter. For more information about affiliation with ASLE, please refer to their website: www.asle.org/site/about/affiliates/guidelines/

It was rightly noted that ASAIL is not in a position to guarantee a panel to ASLE at NALS, given that NALS programming is not determined by our organization. Jodi suggested, however, that we could promise ASLE an ASAIL-sponsored panel that could be proposed for NALS (but could not guarantee acceptance).

To date the Western Literature Association's proposed affiliation only extends to the prospect of co-sponsoring panels at the Modern Languages Association.

There was some discussion of certain ideological/methodological differences between ASAIL and WLA, which have led to conflicts in the past. Nonetheless, Jodi noted that co-sponsorship of panels is a means by which we can raise our profile at the MLA (a profile that has diminished in recent years). Also, this degree of collaboration could be a good first (small) step, in light of the previously noted tensions between members of the organizations. Becca Gercken noted, to the agreement of several present, that the issues raised about WLA argue for the need to raise this issue for discussion on the listserv so that everyone can weigh-in.

The proposed affiliations with ASLE and WLA will be put to a vote by the ASAIL membership through the listserv (using Survey Monkey).

Jodi noted that if we make affiliations with organizations we need liaisons. We recently had a lapse in our affiliation with the American Literature Association (ALA), for example, due to losing our liaison to the organization. Fortunately, we are back on track for the next ALA (where there will be a American Indian drama and theater panel.



4) Update on ASAIL panels at MLA
Our guaranteed panel, on New Native Writers (chaired by Ryan Winn) has been finalized.

Our non-guaranteed panel, on American Indian Literature & Environmental Justice (co-sponsored by ASAIL and ASLE, and co-chaired by Jan Johnson and Janis Fiske) is being finalized currently.

Our second non-guaranteed panel, on Native American Gothic, panel fell through. The chair, Amy Gore, received only two submissions. When one of the panelists withdrew, Amy was forced to cancel the plans for the panel. Jodi suggested that next time we advertise our panels on the NAISA website so as to attract more submissions.

It was noted that our sponsored MLA panels can be vehicles for showcasing graduate students' work, many of whom have to be there for interviews anyway. Jodi confirmed that ASAIL could offer some financial support to graduate student presenters.

5) Report from the Editor of Studies in American Indian Literatures (Chadwick Allen)
We had no official report from Chad on SAIL; however, Lisa Tatonetti offered a brief update: the transition to Chad's leadership (taking over from James Cox and Daniel Heath Justice) is almost complete. The final item of business is to turn the permission over to him. Chad was very regretful not to be at NALS but was kept in Columbus due to obligations as the Director of Graduate Studies. Chad asked that people please submit their work to the journal.

6) Subcommittee Reports
The majority of the subcommittee chairs were not present.

Denise Cummings (Film): Regarding representation of film at this NALS, she noted that it happens organically. Each year they see what is possible, who can come. They tried something new this year and it went well (an assertion that was greeted by hearty applause). They receive suggestions (this year four different things were desired). Denise thought that was too much based on the view that film should complement literature at NALS but should not eclipse the literature. Becca Gercken requested that the film night be scheduled for later in the evening, and others agreed. Denise said she is sensitive to this and will consider it for next year.

Pedagogy: Becca Gercken has agreed to serve as the new chair.



NEW BUSINESS

1) Electing a new Vice President
After some discussion about the ethics of asking a junior faculty member to take on the position, particularly given that the Vice President will become ASAIL President within three years of beginning as VP, it was determined that, of the two nominated candidates (Jill Doerfler and Joseph Bauerkemper), that it made the most sense for Jill to take the position. Jill was elected unanimously and congratulated on her new position.

2) The ASAIL Website
Christina Roberts' service to the organization by designing a beautiful new website for us was again acknowledged. However, in order to utilize the site to maximum effect there are some things that need to be done, including: transferring all of our archives from the Richmond server (the old website) to the new one, finding someone who will keep pages updated (including the notes page, which includes information about conferences and jobs)

Jodi asked if anyone has the skills and willingness to do the coding necessary to make the transfer. It was suggested that we should raise this on the listserv because there may be more people there with the necessary skills. It was suggested that we might think of a mentorship program with students who have some of the needed technological skills, students wanting to get involved with the organizationùa suggestion that was greeted enthusiastically.

There was also discussion, in response to a request by Barb Robbins for ASAIL to compile a handbook handbook of terms for American Indian Literary Studies because there are so many terms we have to explain to students in order to get the most out of the work they study. It was agreed that the website could be a good space for compiling such information (and could yield more traffic on the site) but it was also agreed that any submissions should be vetted (as Lisa Tatonetti suggested), perhaps by being viewed first by the Executive Committee before being posted to the website.

Brian Hudson graciously volunteered to address the website over the summer.

Tereza Szeghi noted that the website already includes invitations for submissions to an ASAIL bibliography (of authors, events, etc.) but that she has received only one submission to date.

Jodi noted that the website is also configured so as to feature regular bloggers but this function has not be utilized.

Regarding the ASAIL Facebook page, Facebook changed its settings and Jodi has not had a chance to redo our page since then.

3) Where to have the ASAIL Business Meeting (a repeated topic of debate)
Jodi observed that this year we are immensely down in the number of people here at this meeting than in previous years. Joseph Bauerkemper suggested that we run a survey to figure out who attends NALS, NAISA, or both. There was another suggestion for two separate surveys: one of those who are ASAIL officers and another of the membership.

4) Revising the ASAIL bylaws
The need to revise the bylaws was repeated several times throughout the meeting -- in conjunction with clarifying the duties of the Vice President, determining what exactly the President's duties at MLA are (and if s/he should still be required to attend that meeting), in discussing the need for an Executive Committee member to be tasked with upkeep of the website, etc. As Jodi read aloud various bylaws it was clear, on multiple accounts, that current practices of the organization are no longer consistent with what the bylaws indicate.

It was proposed that there be a follow-up meeting at NAISA to continue discussion of the bylaws' revision (some could participate through Skype). In the meantime a working group could begin conversation, and perhaps draft new bylaws. Those present at the meeting suggested that the following people be members of this working group due to the need for deep knowledge of different components of the organization: Chad Allen, Daniel Heath Justice, Patrice Hollrah, Jodi Byrd, Bob Nelson, and Margaret Noori.

5) Bolstering connections between ASAIL and Canada/Canadian Indigenous Literatures (proposed by Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair)
Niigaan noted that there has been the most representation of Canda in the previous year's issue of SAIL. He suggested that the new ASAIL bylaws include a position, or part of a position, dedicated to building on this connection, perhaps through connections to existing meetings and organizations in Canada that address indigenous literatures. Although he is not nominating himself for such a position, he did agree put us in touch with people in Canada working in the field.

Jodi observed, and others concurred, that bolstering this link to Canada would make us responsive to the perspective that NAISA is pushing: global indigeneity, rather than just a U.S. focus. It is also significant and timely, as Niigaan observed, that NAISA is going to Canada next year.

Jodi proposed that, ultimately, we may want to reevaluate the name of our organization, given its U.S. focus, but it was agreed that this is a matter for a later date.

Final Remarks
Lisa Tatonetti proposed that ASAIL sponsor a breakfast for graduate students at NAISA (a way of expanding the membership)

Denise Cummings thanked Jodi for her leadership as President of ASAIL and Patrice presented her with a gift. Jodi thanked everyone for the past three years, noted that is has been great to work for the organization, and offered a particular thanks to Bob Nelson ("the backbone of the organization").

Meeting adjourned 4:24 p.m.


2011 ASAIL BUSINESS MEETING
Isleta Casino and Resort, Albuquerque, NM,
March 19, 2011, 12-1:30 pm



I.  12:30PM: CALL TO ORDER AND WELCOME



II.  INTRODUCTION OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
a.   Jodi Byrd, President
b.   Margaret Noori, Vice-President (in absentia)
c.   Amy Hamilton, Secretary
d.   Robert Nelson, Historian and Interim Treasure
e.   SAIL Journal - General Editor, Daniel Heath Justice and Managing Editor, James Cox (in absentia)



III.  EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS
a. Current President - Jodi Byrd

ASAIL Emerging Scholars Professional Development Fellowship (ESPDF) award (information on ASAIL website - $300). Awarded to: (1) Alexandra Harmon, "The Part We Made: Racialized Performance as Resistance in Buffalo Bill's Wild West," 2010 NAISA, Tucson, AZ; (2) Amy Gore, "The First Nations Gothic Novel," 2011 NAISA, Sacramento, CA.

b. Acting Treasurer's Report: Robert Nelson: Handout (see Appendix 1)

c. Outgoing Secretary's Report: Amy Hamilton

Report on the two ASAIL panels created for MLA 2012: (1) American Indian and Other Literary Traditions (guaranteed session), (2) American Indian Theater (awaiting approval - currently "non-guaranteed" session). Both panels drew a strong pool of proposals. Thank you to the session chairs (Tereza Szeghi and Ryan Winn) for their hard work!

d. Historian's Report

e. SAIL Journal Report in absentia (see Appendix 2)
     Lisa Tatonetti - soliciting book reviewers. Please contact her if you are interested in reviewing a book for SAIL.



IV.  SUB-COMMITTEES

a. Pedagogy - Nancy Peterson - 2 sessions sponsored this year at NALS ("Teaching Southeastern Indian Literatures" and "Resisting Students and Subversive Teaching in the Native Literature Classroom: A Roundtable Discussion"). Pedagogy teaching materials on ASAIL website - please submit materials.

b. Website - Transitioning to a new site (can find through asail.org) - old site still up and running with all materials. Christina Roberts has been doing a fabulous job with website design - thank you to Christina.

c. Languages Committee (via email from Margaret Noori) - "At MLA 2012 our panel will be: Indigenous Languages and Identity. I'm pleased to report that we do have a set of papers for presentation, but I wish there were more activity in this area. Indigenous language has a strong presence at NALS and DAIL has kept in part of MLA but my personal goal over the next year will be to gather summary information that can be posted on the ASAIL site that will connect the various language revitalization conferences and communities."



V. NEW BUSINESS

a. Elections for Treasurer and Secretary (Bob Nelson is acting treasurer, Amy Hamilton is outgoing secretary)
     i. New Treasurer - Jeff Berglund, Northern Arizona University
     ii. New Secretary -Tereza Szeghi, University of Dayton

b. MLA Topics for 2013: Discussion of how to handle MLA guaranteed and non-guaranteed sessions in future years. Members present brainstormed possible panel topics and discussed the possibility of co-convened sessions with other MLA Allied and Affiliated Organizations.
     i. Possible Panel Topics: Native American Literature of New England; Pedagogy Panel on Online Research; Queer Indigenous Writing; Boston Tea Party and the Appropriation of Native Identity and History; New Native Writers; Theory Panel - "There is no theory without Native Theory.
     ii. Organizational Collaborations: Western Literature Association; NAISA; others?

c. Discussed possibility of ASAIL Meeting at NAISA: Keep main ASAIL business meeting at NALS, but additional meeting at NAISA - ask NAISA for space or just meet informally. ASAIL sponsored event. Connections to indigenous literary associations outside of U.S.

d. Canadian Native Literature Association (not official name) - planning on approaching ASAIL as organization continues to develop

e. Kim Roppolo: Upcoming Wordcraft Circle: Returning the Gift event in Chickasha, OK, June 9 - 11. Invitation to ASAIL membership. Next year is the 20th anniversary of the Circle's founding. http://www.wordcraftcircle.org/rtg/rtg2011.html



VI. THANK YOU to Amy Hamilton (outgoing secretary) and Bob Nelson (outgoing treasurer) for their service to ASAIL.

Adjourn at 1:20

* * * * *



Appendix 1

2010 ASAIL TREASURER'S REPORT



Highlights
Perhaps the single most important fiscal development of the year was the establishment of an ASAIL Paypal account to allow for online payment of annual membership dues. This new capability makes it possible for our overseas subscribers to avoid exorbitant international check costs and the expensive (and somewhat risky) process of international mailing, and many of our US subscribers appreciate the convenience of being able to handle their membership payment online. Since its inception in late March 39 members - 56% of the 70 transactions during this period - have elected this payment option, and I anticipate that in the coming year 60-65% of all payments will be made online.

ASAIL Membership
We had 197 paid 2010 memberships; 21 of these (10%) were international members, and 29 (15%) were "limited income" members. These figures have not varied much over the past several years, though in recent years there has been a very slight decline in membership. My hope is that the added convenience of online payment will stimulate a modest increase in ASAIL memberships this year.

2011 Projections
The following projections presume that our membership will remain approximately the same as it has been for the past few years; they also presume that University of Nebraska Press doesn't raise the price to us of individual domestic or foreign subscriptions to the journal (currently they charge us $30.40 per subscription plus an additional $24 for non-US subscribers).



Respectfully submitted,

Robert M. Nelson
Treasurer, ASAIL

(Please see ASAIL homepage for full Treasurer's report with details on account activity.)



Appendix 2

SAIL UPDATE FOR BUSINESS MEETING

To the ASAIL membership:

We are sorry that we can't be with you to share this report in person, but Jim wasn't able to make it this year, and Daniel's plans to attend were changed by a death in the family. But if you have any questions or concerns, please don't hesitate to contact us.

It's been a busy and quite challenging year for the editorial staff in terms of infrastructure and institutional funding, but we're happy to say that the quality of the journal itself has remained quite strong. Both the University of Toronto and the University of Texas at Austin have offered administrative support in the form of editorial assistantships for the past five years, but the recession has limited access to some of these funds, with the result that, at Toronto, the assistantship has come to an end, and in the fall we had to say goodbye to our long-time and hard-working submissions assistant, Kyle Wyatt, who's completing the very final stages of his dissertation work. At the publication end, our fantastic and similarly efficient editorial assistant Kirby Brown will soon be Assistant Professor Kirby Brown at the University of Oregon, so his time on the journal will be winding down as well.

Although we're losing our editorial assistants, our wonderful editorial staff has also been increased by one: Lisa Tatonetti has recently come aboard as the Book Review Editor, following Jane Hafen's long and dedicated service in that role.

At the submissions end, we've had some technological issues with the submissions e-mail account, both in terms of access and storage. It's been a pain and a frustration to get it sorted out, or even to identify the problem, but this should be entirely resolved in the next few weeks. If anyone has questions about the status of their submission or review, please contact Daniel directly at daniel.justice@utoronto.ca, as this address is much more dependable. Even with those challenges and the associated reviewing delays, we continue to receive amazing submissions, so much so that we're still over a year ahead in the publishing queue.

As readers may have noticed, we haven't had any guest-edited special issues in the past few years. There were a few reasons for this, but the primary one was that we had a lot of submissions backed up in the queue that needed to be cleared out, and we needed every available issue in order to do so. Yet we've received a number of incredible proposals for special issues, so once the backlog was largely cleared out we decided to put together a set of consistent special issue guidelines to help interested guest editors develop their proposals. We're delighted to announce that we've had two full special issues go through the whole process of submission, review, and acceptance, so these will be out in the next year. One is on digital technologies in Native literature, and the other is on Native political constitutions as literary and critical texts. There are at least two more in the early stages of development. If you have an idea for a special issue, please contact Daniel for the guideline sheet.



This is our fifth and final year as co-editors, and we have been considering the future editorial direction of the journal. These discussions are still ongoing, but we're excited about the various possibilities for the journal, its mandates, and its constituencies. As always, we welcome helpful feedback, so please don't hesitate to contact us with questions, thoughts, or suggestions.

All good wishes,
Daniel Justice and Jim Cox




2010 ASAIL BUSINESS MEETING MINUTES
Isleta Casino & Resort, Albuquerque, New Mexico
March 6, 2010 / 12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Number in attendance: 20



I. CALL TO ORDER AND WELCOME

Jodi Byrd called the meeting to order for Outgoing President Patrice Hollrah (in absentia). P. Jane Hafen distributed gifts for Patrice and mentioned the ASAIL-sponsored breaks.



II. INTRODUCTION OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Jodi Byrd, Outgoing Vice-President/Incoming President

Amy Hamilton, Secretary (in absentia because of new baby); Christina Roberts standing in

Robert Nelson, Historian and Interim Treasurer

SAIL Journal - SAIL General Editor, Daniel Justice (in absentia), and SAIL Managing Editor, James Cox (in absentia)



III. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS

Incoming President - Jodi Byrd

ASAIL Emerging Scholars Professional Development Fellowship (ESPDF) awarded to: (1) Cristina Stanciu to present "'I'm Going Back to My People Where I Belong': The Silent Redskin (1929) and Americans in the Making," NALS 2009; (2) Amy W. Ware to present "Cherokee Intellectualism in the Early Twentieth Century: Will Rogers, Lynn Riggs, and John Oskison," NAISA Conference 2009; (3) Kyle Bladow to present "Food Systems in Selected Fiction by Louise Erdrich," NAISA 2009; (4) Brianna Burke to present "A Traditional Religious Education in Susan Powers' The Grass Dancer," NALS 2010; (5) Brian Twenter to present "Wolakota ogna skanpo: Delphine Red Shirt's Turtle Lung Woman's Granddaughter," NALS 2010.

OutgoingVice-President/Incoming President - Jodi Byrd

Treasurer - Robert Nelson
Incorporated Status, Virginia 501(c)(3) - must complete a federal report each year. Sun Trust Bank Account. 2009 Treasurer report available online - the organization is solvent and projected budgets are included in the report. However, budget may change because of expenses related to accepting online membership renewals (~$200-$350/year).

Secretary - Amy Hamilton, Christina Roberts (MLA panel titles)
Christina reported that changes to MLA convention have occurred. Allied and Affiliate organizations will only have one guaranteed session and will be able to submit proposals for two additional sessions. According to the MLA coordinator, Lorenz Tomassi, the proposals for the two other sessions will be reviewed by the Program Committee and one session must be a collaborative session with another entity, such as a division, discussion group, or allied organization. Additional details are available at: www.mla.org/conv_collab. For this year, the ASAIL guaranteed session will be Native American Poetic Visions and the Canadian Indigenous Literatures panel will be submitted as the possible second panel. The same method for choosing the 2012 panels will continue (online nominations and final voting) and will be handled by the secretary.

Historian - Robert Nelson
Most of the history is documented in html and .pdf format online. Bob reported that he's hoping to get SAIL series 1 in .pdf and also include it online.

SAIL Journal - SAIL General Editor, Daniel Justice (in absentia), and SAIL Managing Editor, James Cox (in absentia)
Bob Nelson read email from Daniel. The text of the email is included below.



IV. SUB-COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Membership - Denise Cummings (in absentia)
Jodi mentioned that there are currently about 120 members, not all of whom are current with dues.

B. Pedagogy - Nancy Peterson
Nancy reported that she decided last year that the group needed to reconnect and reenergize and would like to work on pedagogical topics for future NALS.

C. Native Languages - Margaret Noori
Margaret reported that there is more of a focus on linguistics and Native languages in presentations at NALS and the MLA conference. She also suggested that the ASAIL website include a separate area focusing on the status of Native languages and providing access to information about Native languages.



V. NEW BUSINESS

Elections for Vice-President, Treasurer, ALA Liaison/Coordinator
Two candidates for Vice President, Margaret Noori and Jill Doerfler. The candidates made brief statements and the members in attendance voted. Margaret Noori was elected to the position. No nominations were received for the Treasurer position. Another call was made for nominations, which was unsuccessful. Bob Nelson agreed to serve as interim Treasurer until a candidate steps forward. Brian Twenter (unopposed) agreed to serve as the ALA coordinator candidate.

MLA Panel Topics - survey on ASAIL-L listserv

Possible New Location for ASAIL Business Meeting
Members discussed a possible move to NAISA. After brief discussion, members agreed to work first on improving ASAIL presence (conference panels, etc.) at NAISA before a move takes place.

Website - Christina Roberts
Christina reported that in preparation for the business meeting, the Executive Committee members in attendance suggested the formation of a new website subcommittee. Christina asked if members in attendance were interested in helping, and she received three offers from Tereza Szeghi, Jill Doefler, and Becca Gerken.



VI. ADJOURNMENT

Jodi Byrd adjourned the meeting.



-------

Studies in American Indian Literatures 2009 Report

CURRENT STATUS

Submission and Review
Our rate of submissions have increased by about twenty percent this year; on average now we have about sixty to eighty manuscripts in the review queue at any one time. Last year our acceptance rate was about 1 of 4 (and about half of these had initially been sent back to their authors as "revise and resubmit"); rejected manuscripts total less than 15% of resolved manuscripts, whereas the bulk of submissions--over half--are returned under the category of revise and resubmit, meaning that there's merit in the submission but it requires significant revision to be considered again for publication. Clearer submission guidelines and a faster resolution phase has helped improve both the quality of submissions in general and in the manuscripts we accept for publication.

We're always recalibrating our review process to ensure that responses are as timely as possible. Our goal is four months, which we occasionally meet, but more often we range in the six to seven month range, largely because of chronic difficulty in getting outside reviewers to either respond to our initial queries or to reply to the manuscripts themselves in a timely manner. This complaint aside, most of our reviewers are quite prompt in their responses, and even the late ones tend to be quite conscientious about giving full and helpful feedback. The expansion of our editorial board, and our policy of having all submissions read by one editorial board member, has helped speed the process considerably, and our board is incredibly helpful and responsive, to the benefit of the entire process.

If members are interested in serving as manuscript reviewers, please send an e-mail with your name, contact info, and areas of particular interest to Kyle Wyatt at our Toronto office: sail@chass.utoronto.ca.

Editorial Staff Changes
This last year saw the departure of Jane Hafen as Book Review Editor after seven years of dedicated service, along with Janet McAdams as Creative Works Editor and Arnold Krupat, Joanne DiNova, and J. Anthony Tyeeme Clark as editorial board members. Kirby Brown's term as Jim's editorial assistant ended last year as well, though he continues to work with Jim at UT-Austin. While we bid farewell to these supportive and committed colleagues, we've been pleased to welcome others into the fold: LeAnne Howe has joined our continuing Creative Works Editor Joseph Bruchac in reviewing the ever-few but always welcome creative submissions; Margaret Noori, Chad Allen, Ken Roemer, and Christopher Teuton have joined the Editorial Board, and Bryan Russell is Jim's new editorial assistant. Jace Weaver, Lisa Brooks, Robin Riley Fast, Susan Gardner, Patrice Hollrah, Molly McGlennen, and Lisa Tatonetti continue their work on the Editorial Board, and Kyle Wyatt--with whom many of you have been in touch over the past couple of years--will continue for a final year as Daniel's editorial assistant at the University of Toronto.

We hope to have an announcement about our new Book Review editor soon; Jim and Bryan have been handling the interim book review duties. Similarly, we are looking to the future and the end of our term as joint editors; while we've both enjoyed the experience, we firmly believe that the journal and the field are best served by new editorial perspectives, so we're in discussions about the next editorial generation for the journal.

FUTURE DIRECTIONS
We've been quite insistent for the last couple of years that we not have any guest edited issues, as we had a large backlog of essays that required resolution before we could set aside whole issues for manuscripts outside the reviewing pool. We also wanted to expand on the guidelines our predecessor, Malea Powell, instituted to ensure that each special issue made a strong, coherent, and significant contribution to discussions in the field. Now that the backlog is more manageable, and we've received a number of extraordinary and well-considered proposals for special issues, we've reassessed the place of special issues in our lineup and hope to see some starting to appear in the next couple of volume years, though not likely more than one per volume (rarely perhaps two depending on the schedule and the actual realization of some of the proposed issues), as our main submission pool is still our publication priority. To give a sense of what might be appearing in future issues, we have strong proposals and/or pending/full issues on tribalography, Native northeastern literatures, digital literacy and Native literatures, Gerald Vizenor and nationhood, and the intersections of animal studies and Native literature. Lots of cutting-edge work here!

We continue to be committed to making space in the journal for provocative conversations about issues of concern to scholars in the field. If ASAIL members would like to offer commentaries on relevant literary issues for consideration, please contact Daniel at sail@chass.utoronto.ca.

Short creative submissions have always been a small minority of materials that we publish, but we're always interested in publishing creative work by Native writers, whether from established or emerging voices, students, academics, community members, etc. Short fiction and creative nonfiction (generally 2500 words or less), visual art, and poetry are welcome.

Final Thoughts
As always, we welcome constructive feedback on the journal, its content, its editorial and review processes, and the role of ASAIL members in ensuring its continued high quality and commitments to the Association's various constituencies. SAIL's strength is its community, and we're so pleased to note that the dedication of this community to the journal and its aims has been very strong indeed.

Respectfully submitted,
James Cox and Daniel Justice, Editors




2009 ASAIL BUSINESS MEETING MINUTES
Isleta Casino & Resort, Albuquerque, New Mexico
February 28, 2009 / 12:15 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Number in attendance: 32



I. CALL TO ORDER AND WELCOME

Patrice opened by giving thanks to the Clan mothers and the Isleta people. She also asked those in attendance to take a moment of silence to honor those who passed last year.



II. INTRODUCTION OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Patrice introduced the members of the Executive Committee: Patrice Hollrah, President; Jodi Byrd, Vice-President; Treasurer, Robert Nelson (for Ellen Arnold); Secretary, Christina Roberts; Historian, Robert Nelson; SAIL General Editor, Daniel Heath Justice; SAIL Managing Editor, James Cox.



III. SUB-COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. Film: No updates reported by Denise Cummings, but Patrice informed those in attendance that Denise was responsible for bringing The Exiles to NALS.

B. Pedagogy: Patrice reported that there is a need for a new head of the pedagogy sub-committee since Barbara Cook requested to step down. Nancy Peterson reported that there haven't been email exchanges in quite some time, but she will email other members of committee to initiate discussion.

C. Native Languages: Margaret (Meg) Noori reported that there was a good connection to Native literatures and languages at the Modern Language Association (MLA). She also mentioned that translation is big at the MLA, and there is room for Indigenous languages to be a big part of this area. She also stated that elders are passing away at an alarming rate, which makes work on Indigenous languages even more critical.



IV. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS

Treasurer: Robert (Bob) Nelson gave the treasurer report for outgoing treasurer Ellen Arnold. Bob indicated that the organization is solvent and currently has $29,000 in the bank. He mentioned that this amount will decrease by approximately $6,000 for the publication of the next volume of SAIL, and there will also be a $300 fee for filing if the organization decided to follow through with filing of 501(c)(3) status.

Secretary: Christina Roberts updated the members on the ASAIL panels at the 2009 MLA conference. The two panels will be "Indians 101: Teaching Early American Indian Literatures" (Chair: James Ruppert) and "Indians 102: Teaching Contemporary American Indian Literatures" (Chair: Joseph Bauerkemper).

Historian: Robert reported that the organization is still acquiring history.

SAIL update: General Editor, Daniel Heath Justice, reported that the 2nd issue of volume 21 is complete. He also mentioned that there is interest in adding a forum section, so he asked people to consider submitting letters about work going on in tribal communities, important events, and other points that might be of interest to members and those who read SAIL. Daniel reported that the Editorial Board will be expanding, and since there is a backlog of article and book reviews, there has been a pause on special issues of SAIL. There is a desire to have a 4-month turnover for manuscripts, but there is currently a 6-month to 1-year timeline, because of the need for reviewers. Daniel asked members to consider reviewing articles, especially if they haven't in the last year, and asked for established scholars to submit material to SAIL for publication. Managing Editor, James Cox, reiterated Daniel's points and mentioned that there are back issues of SAIL available if anyone is interested. Daniel also recognized the invaluable assistance of the editorial assistants.

President: Patrice mentioned that food has been provided at the business meeting per Lisa Tatonetti's request last year. She also reported that, in light of the consistent challenges for the ASAIL treasurer, she has been reviewing how other organizations, such as the Association for the Study of Literatures and the Environment (ASLE), handle finances. She concluded by acknowledging the assistance of the office assistance at East Carolina University, Brandy Dashnau, who has been assisting Ellen with the treasurer duties. A card has been sent to her to thank her for her assistance.



V. NEW BUSINESS

A. Elections for Treasurer and Secretary:

1. Patrice asked for nomination for ASAIL Treasurer. After no one was nominated, Patrice reported that Bob Nelson offered to take over responsibilities and mentioned that the duties should improve after incorporation. Bob noted that the by-laws permit for extenuating circumstances to allow for the nomination and election of a treasurer separate from the business meeting. Bob volunteered to take over the duties until after incorporation.

2. Patrice called for nominations for Secretary. Christina Roberts nominated Amy Hamilton, assistant professor at Northern Michigan University, who introduced herself to the members. Patrice asked if there were additional nominations. No other nominations were made, so Kenneth Roemer moved for closing of nomination, which was seconded and approved. Bob Nelson then moved to vote by acclamation and members elected Amy.

B. ASAIL Incorporation: Bob Nelson reported that the Articles of Incorporation are ready to be submitted in Virginia. Once the Articles have been submitted, he'll be able to open a bank account. Members discussed the need for a national, easily accessible bank. Bob then stated that ASAIL will have 15 months to get approval from the IRS for 501(c)(3) status. Patrice called for another vote on whether or not to incorporate, a motion was moved to approve, which was seconded and approved by members.

C. Update Website: Due to unforeseen circumstances, the website update was delayed, but Christina and Daniel will work together on a new design for the ASAIL website. The goal is to have the new website complete by next year.

D. ASAIL Pedagogical Review Board sub-committee: Patrice mentioned to the members a request by Barbara Robins to have an additional sub-committee devoted to pedagogical review for members who need ASAIL support for curriculum updates. Members discussed the request and suggested that existing sub-committees handle these matters. Members also discussed the need for sub-committees to get the Executive Committee's approval before using ASAILÆs name. The suggestion that existing sub-committees handle these requests was seconded and approved.

E. Graduate Student Travel Scholarships: Patrice solicited member feedback on travel scholarships. Members discussed the need for a statement that specifies the process of awarding travel monies and that the scholarship support the delivery of papers at conference venues like NALS, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA), and possibly the MLA. There was also a request to rename the scholarship to ASAIL Emergent Scholar Fellowship in order to add prestige to the award. After a period of discussion, Patrice moved to have the editors of SAIL draft a statement to include in the journal and on the website, which was seconded and approved by members.



VI. ANNOUNCEMENTS

A. Patrice asked Christina to come forward and presented her with a gift to recognize her service to ASAIL.



VII. ADJOURNMENT

A. Prior to adjournment, Jodi Byrd asked about the need to choose MLA panels for the 2011 conference (the conference will not be held in 2010 since it is moving to January). There was insufficient time left to complete the process, so it will be handled via email.

B. Patrice adjourned the meeting.




2008 ASAIL BUSINESS MEETING MINUTES
Saturday, March 29, 2008
Mystic Lake Casino, Minneapolis, MN



I. CALL TO ORDER AND WELCOME

A. President Patrice Hollrah called meeting to order and thanked the Clan Mothers and Brother (Steering Committee) and the Native American Literature Symposium (NALS) for allowing ASAIL to hold its business meeting during the Symposium. She mentioned that ASAIL sponsored a break at NALS and will continue to in the future. She also thanked the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community. Thank you to the Clan Mothers of the Native American Literature Symposium (NALS)

II. INTRODUCTION OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Patrice recognized outgoing President, Debra Barker, introduced herself as the Incoming President, and introduced the other executive committee officers and their duties - Treasurer, Ellen Arnold; Secretary, Christina Roberts; Historian, Robert Nelson; SAIL General Editor, Daniel Justice (in absentia); SAIL Managing Editor, James Cox (in absentia)

III. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS

A. SAIL. Christina read the status of the journal that was submitted by SAIL General Editor, Daniel Justice and SAIL Managing Editor, James Cox. Jane Hafen shared the status of the SAIL book reviews (there are over 20 in backlog, but they will be published in the next editions) with members.

B. Treasurer. Ellen reported that there is over $25,000 in the treasury and approximately $6,400 has been added since she took over the position of treasurer. She also reported that the organization now has under 200 members, and the organization and members should encourage new memberships. She mentioned that no money has been spent, other than ASAIL's sponsorship of the break at NALS. Ellen raised issue about increase in production costs for SAIL. She reported that the organization now pays $29.60 per SAIL subscription, which means that the current membership rate ($30) is inadequate. The issue was tabled until after executive committee reports.
     At this time, a member raised the question about whether or not those who are published in SAIL are required to be members. Brief discussion ensued, and Patrice called for a vote. The members unanimously agreed to this requirement. After the vote, a member suggested that the organization require membership at the time of publication. Another vote was called for, and all but one member agreed to the amendment. Patrice noted that this discussion and vote should be relayed to the editors of SAIL.
     Members also participated in a discussion about the possibility for a graduated scale for membership dues. Ellen noted that there are very few patron memberships, and she let the members know that many memberships (graduate student and fixed income) are already subsidized.
     Lisa Tatonetti suggested that the organization consider food for next year's business meeting to encourage more member participation. There was also as suggestion to make the notice in the NALS program more inviting to conference participants.

C. Historian. Bob mentioned the website updates and noted that the website will start migrating, but the ASAIL materials will remain available during the migration process. Christina, Bob, and Debra's assistant, Amber, will work together to transition the website.

D. Secretary. Christina reported to members that she will forward the 2008 MLA panel titles to the organization via the ASAIL list serve. She will also forward a draft of the business meeting minutes to the members for revision and approval.

IV. NEW BUSINESS

A. ASAIL Brochure Project. Debra discussed the brochure in detail and showed the members present the prototype for the brochure. She reported that 1000-1500 brochures will be printed.

B. Elections for Vice-President. Patrice introduced the two candidates - Jodi Byrd (Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma), American Indian Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Margaret Noori (Ojibwe), Ojibwe Language & Literature, Program in American Culture, University of Michigan - and asked members if there were any additional nominations. Jodi read her statement and Christina read Margaret's statement. Ballots were passed out and members elected Jodi Byrd to the office of Vice-President.

C. Travel Money for Graduate Students. Patrice informed members that the organization can fund up to 10 $300 travel scholarships for graduate students. She also noted that the new website will include a link for graduate students to submit an application for a travel scholarship.

D. Subcommittee Reports

1. Membership. Denise Cummings had to leave early for a film conference, and there were no updates.

2. Native Film. No updates. Patrice noted that there is a good chance that NALS will have a special focus on film in the future.

3. Native Languages. Christina read the statement that Margaret Noori provided.

4. Pedagogy. Ellen read the statement that Barbara Cook provided. Barbara wants to invite someone to take over the committee on pedagogy. She asked that people contact her if they are interested.

E. MLA 2009 Panels. Patrice mentioned that the organization consider planning

MLA panel topics at the business meetings at NALS instead of the MLA. Since there were no objections, Patrice asked for members to recommend panel suggestions. Bob reminded members of previous session titles, and Debra suggested a focus on pedagogy. After brief discussion, Jane Hafen suggested Indians 101 and after a series of revisions the members decided on two session topics: Indians 101 - Teaching Early American Indian Literatures and Indians 102 - Teaching Contemporary American Indian Literatures.

V. ANNOUNCEMENTS, HONORINGS, AND PRESENTATIONS

A. Thank you to Debra Barker. Patrice thanked Debra for her years of service and presented her with a gift. Debra thanked the organization for the opportunity.

VI. ADJOURNMENT. Meeting adjourned at 1:15pm.



Respectfully submitted,
Christina Roberts
ASAIL Secretary




2007 ASAIL BUSINESS MEETING MINUTES

Saturday, March 10, 2007
12:40-1:30 P.M.
Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort, Mount Pleasant, MI

Members present: 27



I. Call to order and Welcome. President Debra thanked the Clan Mothers and Brother (Steering Committee) of the Native American Literature Symposium (NALS) for allowing ASAIL to hold its business meeting during the Symposium. She also thanked the Seventh Generation Program and the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe of Michigan for the traditional feast at the Elijah Elk Center.



II. Introduction of Executive Committee. Debra introduced the Executive Committee consisting of Vice-President, Patrice Hollrah; Outgoing Treasurer, Siobhan Senier; Outgoing Secretary, Lisa Tatonetti (in absentia); Historian, Robert Nelson; Outgoing SAIL Editor, Malea Powell (in absentia); Incoming SAIL General Editor, Daniel Justice (in absentia); Incoming SAIL Managing Editor, James Cox (in absentia).

III. Executive Committee Reports

Vice President:
A. Patrice Hollrah had no business to report.

Secretary:
A. Debra read Secretary Lisa Tatonetti's minutes from the MLA 2006 DAIL Business Meeting. MLA Convention dates will change from December to January beginning in 2010.

B. ASAIL panels for MLA 2007, Chicago, will be (1) 30th Anniversary of ASAIL, co-chaired by Malea Powell and Daniel Justice; and (2) Critical Approaches to Teaching First Nations / Native American Film, chaired by Beth Piatote.

C. DAIL panels for MLA 2007 will be (1) Red and Black: Comparative Symbols of Survival chaired by Chezia Thompson Cager; and (2) Native Languages, co-chaired by Fred White and Simon Ortiz.

D. There will be a field trip to The Newberry Library.

E. Fewer members are attending ASAIL and DAIL panels at MLA, and there was discussion about how to increase those numbers.

F. The Committee on the Literatures of People of Color in the United States and Canada (CLPCUSC) endorsed the "Statement on Indigenous Languages of the World" developed by the Ad Hoc Committee on Native American Languages and approved by the executive committee of the Division on American Indian Literatures. The statement was approved by the MLA Executive Council at its 23-24 February 2007 meeting.

Treasurer:
A. Siobhan Senier summarized her research into a 501/C/3 status for ASAIL. The attorney discouraged the move because ASAIL would have to worry about back taxes, etc. There was a motion to keep ASAIL's funds under university accounts, which was passed by the membership.

Historian:
A. Bob Nelson announced that the PDF files for SAIL Journal articles are online at the website: http://facultystaff.richmond.edu/~rnelson/ASAIL/sail-hp.html

B. Bob noted that there is a membership form at the website for those who want to join ASAIL.



IV. New Business

A. Elections: Christina Roberts was nominated for Secretary of ASAIL, and Ellen Arnold was nominated for Treasurer of ASAIL. Ballots were passed out and counted by Patrice Hollrah and Siobhan Senier; and both nominees were elected and congratulated as the new Secretary and Treasurer of ASAIL for 2007-2009.

B. ASAIL Brochure Project: Debra reported that she had arranged for University of Wisconsin students to design a new brochure for ASAIL, and she requested that members e-mail her suggestions for information that should be highlighted in the brochure. Chad Allen recommended that Debra ask members for suggestions through the ASAIL listserv.

C. Travel Money for Graduate Students: Debra reminded members that there are funds available for graduate students to attend NALS and MLA. The details for applying for funds will be forthcoming.

D. Opportunity for Graduate Students: Debra announced a call for Native graduate students for The Committee on the Literatures of People of Color in the United States and Canada (CLPCUSC). Names are due by January 2008.

E. ASAIL Membership Dues: Because the University of Nebraska Press needs the mailing list of SAIL subscribers by February, dues ideally should be received and processed by the treasurer in November. Various ways of reminding members to pay their dues were discussed.

F. Hopewell Mounds: Chad Allen asked the members to approve a letter of support from ASAIL as the petitioning organization in an effort to gain World Heritage Site Status for the Hopewell Mounds in Newark, Ohio. His request was approved, and he agreed to write the letter.

G. Subcommittee Reports: Angelica Lawson stepped down from the Native Languages subcommittee, and Margaret Noori agreed to be the new chair. Angelica proposed a new subcommittee on Native Film and offered to be the chair.
        Ellen Arnold announced that the Pedagogy subcommittee had edited a special issue of SAIL on pedagogy, and she thanked Barbara Cook for her work on that issue. As Ellen was elected the new Treasurer of ASAIL, she stepped down from the Pedagogy subcommittee, and Barbara Cook agreed to be the new chair.
        Denise Cummings reported on the New Membership subcommittee and using the new ASAIL brochure as a marketing tool to attract new members, as well as the idea of required membership in order to publish in SAIL.



V. Announcements, Honorings, and Presentations

A. Debra noted her appreciation for the acknowledgement in the NALS Program of those who passed away in 2006. She asked for a moment of silence for Bud Hirsch, who "was one of us."

B. Debra thanked Siobhan Senier, who stepped down from the Executive Committee this year, and presented her with a gift in appreciation for her good work for the organization.



VI. Adjournment: 1:30 P.M.



Respectfully submitted,
Patrice Hollrah
ASAIL Vice-President


2006 ASAIL BUSINESS MEETING MINUTES

Saturday, April 8, 2006 , 12:00-1:15 pm
NALS / Soaring Eagle Casino & Resort, Mount Pleasant, MI



I. CALL TO ORDER AND WELCOME

Outgoing President Daniel Heath Justice called the meeting to order. He then welcomed ASAIL members and other visitors and thanked the Native American Literature Symposium organizers and the Saginaw Chippewa.



II. INTRODUCTION OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Daniel introduced the Executive Committee consisting of himself as Outgoing President, Debra Barker as Incoming President/Outgoing Vice-President, Lisa Tatonetti as Secretary, Siobhan Senier as Treasurer, Robert Nelson as Historian, and Malea Powell as SAIL Editor (in absentia).



III. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS

President:
A. Daniel began his report by announcing the organization's completion of its annual seven-year review for its MLA affiliation. The comprehensive review examines both what the organization has already accomplished and what goals it hopes to attain during the next seven years. Daniel acknowledged Ginny Carney, whose work for ASAIL was vital to the current review.

B. Daniel also announced the MLA accepted a proposal submitted by the Committee on the Literatures of People of Color in the United States (CLPCUSC) entitled "Guidelines for Good Practices." LaVonne Ruoff was central to the construction and passage of these guidelines, which advocate for best practices in: 1) "the study of the literatures, cultures, and languages of people of color in the U.S."; and 2) "the recruitment, mentoring and evaluation of junior faculty members of color."

C. Daniel concluded by requesting that members forward suggestions for ways to increase ASAIL membership.

Vice-President:
A
. Debra discussed the importance of tribal outreach at the local level. She called for the association to do grassroots work that considers foundational elements of culture.

B. Debra also announced that as a member of the CLPCUSC she was working on a committee focusing on the best ways to support faculty of color. Debra is currently compiling a bibliography to help support the committee's work. She asked for suggestions form ASAIL members. Chad Allen offered to email an extensive bibliography compiled at Ohio State.

Treasurer:
A.
Siobhan noted that ASAIL currently has $25, 027.20 in its account.

B. Siobhan also noted that ASAIL membership fees are due. The 2006 membership fee is $30.00. Checks must be made out to the University of New Hampshire.

C. Siobhan then discussed the possibility of ASAIL filing for 5013C (tax-exempt) status. Since this topic had arisen at a number of previous ASAIL meetings, Siobhan researched the details prior to the NALS meeting and drafted the necessary papers with the help of an attorney. She explained that such status may result in complications given the fact that once an association has more than $20,000 in its treasury it is liable for back taxes. There was also some discussion about the filing location since an organization must incorporate in a specific place. Discussion ensued about the various issues at hand and, ultimately, the 5013C papers were signed by the members of the ASAIL Executive Committee.

Secretary:
A.
Lisa had no business to report.

Historian:
A.
Bob announced that he would soon begin putting series one of SAIL into PDF format so copies of the original documents would be available online.

SAIL Editor:
A.
Daniel read Malea's report. Malea began by thanking the ASAIL membership for their support during her tenure as journal editor. She then detailed the process by which the journal would change hands. Malea will see volumes 18 and 19 through completion. Daniel will begin his editorship of the journal with volume 20.

B. A list of the contracted journal issues was presented.

C. Discussion ensued about the journal. Patrice Hollrah suggested that we post the upcoming SAIL issues to the ASAIL website. Susan Gardner suggested that we expedite the SAIL acknowledgment process. Linda Helstern noted the possibilities of mail delays since the journal would now be housed at the University of Toronto.



IV. NEW BUSINESS

A. Elections: Susan Brill de Ramirez and Patrice Hollrah had both been nominated and agreed to run for the position of Vice-President of ASAIL. Both candidates made statements. Lisa passed out ballots and counted votes. Siobhan helped tally the votes. ASAIL thanked both candidates for agreeing to run and congratulated Patrice Hollrah, who is the new Vice-President of ASAIL for 2006-2008 at which time she will move into the position of 2008-2010 President.

B. Subcommittee Reports: Ellen Arnold gave the ASAIL Pedagogy Subcommittee report. She noted that the committee submitted new syllabi to the ASAIL website and encouraged the membership to do the same. In addition, the committee organized two panels for NALS: "Teaching the Contexts" chaired by Ellen Arnold, and "Generations: A Roundtable Discussion on Teaching American Indian Literatures and American Indian Studies," chaired by Eric Anderson. Finally, the committee proposed a special issue of SAIL on pedagogy, edited by Susan Gardner, Barbara Cook, and Lynn Domina. The committee hopes that this forthcoming issue will form the basis of a teaching guide that the committee will work on in the near future.



V. ANNOUNCEMENTS, HONORINGS, AND PRESENTATIONS

A. Daniel honored Malea on behalf of ASAIL for her tireless work as the SAIL editor. He cited the journal's transformation under her watch and offered ASAIL's heartfelt thanks for her commitment. Finally, Daniel noted that Malea would be presented with a token of the membership's gratitude.

B. Connie Jacobs announced that she and Debra Barker are compiling a collection of essays on underrepresented authors in American Indian Literatures. Proposals are due at the end of May and essays manuscripts of no more than ten pages will be due by September. The call was subsequently posted to the ASAIL listserv.

C. Susan Gardner noted that there will be an upcoming Vine Deloria tribute conference.

D. Daniel asked that we take a moment to recognize and honor those who have passed away during the previous year.

E. Daniel concluded the meeting by thanking the organization for its support during his time as president and asking that we take good care of each other.



VI. CONCLUSION

A. Debra honored Daniel for his service as Vice President and President of ASAIL. She recognized his important contributions to the organization and presented a token of the organization's gratitude.



Respectfully submitted,
Lisa Tatonetti
Secretary, ASAIL


2005 ASAIL Business Meeting Minutes
NALS / Saturday, April 9, 2005

Members present: 30
     Daniel Justice (President), Debra Barker (Vice-President), Siobhan Senier (Treasurer), Robert Nelson (Historian), Patrice Hollrah (Secretary)



I. CALL TO ORDER AND WELCOME: 12:15 p.m.
A. Daniel Justice thanked the Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, an enterprise of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, and the Clan Mothers (Steering Committee) of the Native American Literature Symposium (NALS) for allowing ASAIL to hold its business meeting during the Symposium.



II. INTRODUCTION OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
A. Daniel Justice introduced the ASAIL officers:
     1. Debra Barker, Vice-President
     2. Patrice Hollrah, Secretary
     3. Siobhan Senier, Treasurer
     4. Bob Nelson, Historian
     5. Malea Powell, Editor of SAIL



III. OLD BUSINESS
A. Executive Committee Reports

  1. Daniel Justice explained his objectives:
         a. Make more people aware of ASAIL and SAIL
         b. Send personal invitations to those publishing in Native American Literature to join ASAIL
         c. Expand alliances with other groups and associations
  2. Debra Barker read Ellen Arnold's (chair) report on the Pedagogy and Teaching Committee. In brief, the report mentioned the following:
    a. Build the teaching materials database on the ASAIL website
    b. Propose a SAIL special issue devoted to pedagogy and teaching
    c. Propose a SAIL panel or roundtable on pedagogy and teaching for the next NALS
         d. Create a formal pedagogy and teaching guide for American Indian literatures
  3. Patrice Hollrah thanked Daniel Justice for his leadership throughout her term as secretary. She read the titles and presenters' names of the two ASAIL-sponsored panels for MLA 2005 and encouraged people to attend and support the panels:
         a. "Broadening the Conversation: Teaching Beyond the Canonical Native Writers": Co-presiders Debra K. S. Barker and Connie Jacobs; participants Granville Ganter, Virginia Kennedy, Siobhan Senier, Kenneth Roemer, and James Ruppert
         b. "Ethics and American Indian Cultures": Presider Christina A. Roberts; participants Patrice Hollrah, Karen Lee Osborne, and Laura Beard
  4. Siobhan Senier gave the treasurer's report:
         a. Thanked former treasurer Bob Nelson for all his work and help
         b. Explained ASAIL members' dues must be paid up before voting in elections
         c. Announced that dues will be raised this year because ASAIL subsidizes subscriptions for tribal colleges and international subscribers, and travel to conferences for graduate students and tribal college students/faculty
         d. Reported that steps to incorporate ASAIL as a nonprofit organization have begun
  5. Bob Nelson gave the historian's report:
         a. "We're still here!"
  6. Malea Powell reported on the status of SAIL:
         a. First volume series with the University of Nebraska Press is complete.
         b. Special issue, 16.4, on Simon Ortiz sold out.
         c. Special issue on LaVonne Ruoff is ready with thanks to James Ruppert and contributors.
         d. Future special issues are: Native Languages, guest editor Fred White; James Welch, guest editor Kate Shanley; Native Rhetorics, guest editors Scott Lyons and Amanda Cobb; and Red-Black Community in Native Writers and Literature.
         e. 30th anniversary issue in 2007 will be a double issue.
         f. Draft of Policy and Procedures Manual for ASAIL and SAIL is intended to decentralize authority.
         g. New review board members are James Cox and Lisa Tatonetti, and Janet McAdams is creative works editor.
         h. The end of the editorial rotation is near. Five members came on at the same time, so in the next issues of SAIL, there will be calls for editorial board positions.
         i. SAIL issue is 120 pages, but there is discussion about expansion with new section, such as pedagogy, etc.
         j. Thanks to all for their support.
  7. Jane Hafen, SAIL book review editor, requested people who owe her book reviews to send them as soon as possible.

B. Daniel Justice expressed his thanks to Patrice Hollrah for her term as secretary and presented her with a gift from ASAIL.



IV. NEW BUSINESS

A. Elections

  1. Interim treasurer Siobhan Senier as the only nominee for treasurer was officially elected to the position.
  2. Daniel Justice read statements by nominees for secretary, Eric Anderson and Lisa Tatonetti, and Lisa Tatonetti was elected.

B. Subcommittee Reports

  1. LeAnne Howe, chair of the Tribal Outreach Committee, reported that she sent an e-mail to the ASAIL-L to meet on Saturday morning, but nobody showed up. She has many ideas and connections to tribal colleges. Deborah Miranda offered to co-chair the committee.
  2. Denise Cummings, chair of Fundraising and Subscriptions, reported that ASAIL absorbs the cost for overseas subscriptions. She is interested in the encouragement of sponsors and welcomes anyone who has ideas regarding the shaping of the work to be done.
  3. Angelica Lawson, chair of State of Indigenous Languages Committee, reported that she will share her resources on Ofelia Zepeda (Tohono O'odham) and Nora Naranjo Morse (Santa Clara Pueblo). Bob Nelson will add a link to the ASAIL website for information related to texts with native languages. ASAIL would like to keep people informed of what is happening in native language revitalization.
  4. Qwo-Li Driskill, chair of the Graduate Student Committee, has set up a website for graduate students. ASAIL will add a box for additional donations to fund travel for graduate students and tribal college faculty and students.

C. ASAIL Statement on Academic Freedom

  1. This statement is in response to the controversy on Ward Churchill and the ways in which Ethnic and Native Studies programs are under siege. A committee of four people--Jodi Byrd, Virginia Kennedy, Arnold Krupat, and Simon Ortiz--has a draft, and the final version will be sent to the membership for approval.

D. Other New Business

  1. As a gesture of thanks to the Clan Mothers for allowing ASAIL to hold its business meeting at NALS, ASAIL will bring more tribal students to the symposium.
  2. LaVonne Ruoff's work on "Guideline for Good Practice: Native American Languages" passed and is officially a part of the MLA Committee on the Literatures of People of Color in the United States and Canada (CLPCUSC). Pamphlets will be available.



V. ANNOUNCEMENTS AND PRESENTATIONS

A. LeAnne Howe thanked the Executive Board for their work and noted that she sees the SAIL journal around the country. She asked the membership to be thinking about the next editor who will need to continue the good work that has been done up till now.

B. Susan Brill de Ramirez asked that membership forms be taken to other venues, such as the Return the Gift Conference and the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment Conference.

C. Deborah Miranda announced the Festival of Native Writers, May 9-10, Washington and Lee University, with featured writers Allison Hedge Coke, Linda Hogan, Janet McAdams, Ron Welburn, and Karenne Wood.



VI. ADJOURNMENT: 1:12 p.m.




2004 ASAIL Business Meeting Minutes
NALS / Saturday, 17 April 2004

Members present: 60

Daniel Justice (President), Chadwick Allen (Outgoing President), Robert Nelson (Treasurer), Patrice Hollrah (Secretary)

I. Call to order: 12:30 p.m.

A. Daniel Justice thanked the Clan Mothers (Steering Committee) of the Native American Literature Symposium (NALS) and Mystic Lake Casino Hotel for allowing ASAIL to hold its business meeting during the Symposium.

B. He also noted that ASAIL and NALS are two separate organizations.

II. Introduction of Officers

A. Daniel Justice introduced the ASAIL officers:
     1. Chad Allen, Immediate Past President
     2. Bob Nelson, Treasurer
     3. Patrice Hollrah, Secretary
     4. Malea Powell, Editor of SAIL

III. Old Business

A. Officer Reports
     1. Immediate Past President: Chad Allen remarked that being president was a good experience, as was being involved with the listserv, bringing more people into the leadership of ASAIL, and moving the SAIL journal to the University of Nebraska Press. He concluded by saying he was excited about the next years in ASAIL.
     2. Vice-President/President: Daniel Justice thanked Chad Allen for his work as President and presented him with two books, one by Greg Scofield and the other by Lee Maracle.
     3. Secretary: Patrice Hollrah reported that the officers had been in discussion about creating an officer handbook and about establishing relationships with affiliate organizations. Daniel Justice added that ASAIL was now affiliated with the Society for the Study of American Women Writers.
     4. Treasurer: Bob Nelson said that the ASAIL Budget Report is online at the ASAIL website. The current balance is $27,000, and there is $2,000 outstanding debt for Volume 15 of SAIL.
     5. Editor--SAIL: Malea Powell stated that there were 50 submissions to SAIL last year, 20 of which were creative writings. She urged people to submit critical essays, and she also called for volunteers to review manuscripts.
     a. The timeline from submission to publication is now 18 months, so hitting deadlines is important.
     b. Issue 16.3 is going to press, issue 16.4 is a special issue on Simon Ortiz, and issue 17 is a special issue on A. LaVonne Brown Ruoff. There will be more honor editions in the future.
     c. There have been conversations about expanding the editorial board membership/staff, and Janet McAdams has been invited to join Joseph Bruchac.
     d. The Executive Board of ASAIL and the Editorial Board of SAIL will be in conversation and soliciting feedback regarding the status of the journal.
     e. Malea thanked the membership for its continued support and gave a gift to Bob Nelson for all his help, support, guidance, and knowledge regarding the production of SAIL.
     f. Daniel gave additional honoring for Bob's service as treasurer and his work with the journal.

IV. Scheduled New Business

A. Elections for Treasurer will take place next year, and an interim treasurer will be appointed.

B. Bylaw Amendments VI.B and VI.C.6 passed. Bob Nelson will be the ASAIL historian.
     1. David Moore asked about the future of the ASAIL Newsletter, which has moved to the ASAIL Notes.
     2. Kim Roppolo asked about the future of the ASAIL website, which Bob Nelson will continue to manage.

C. Debra Barker and James Cox were the nominees for the Vice-President/President-Elect. They each gave a short platform speech, and Debra Barker was voted the next Vice-President/President Elect.

V. Unscheduled New Business

A. There was no new business.

VI. Announcements

A. A. LaVonne Brown Ruoff has encouraged ASAIL members to become more involved in MLA committees as officers.

B. Malea Powell and Roberta Hill are on the committee for Writers of Color.

C. Scott Andrews asked how elections are different for MLA committees.

D. Chad Allen responded that being on other MLA committees is one way to have an influence on the discussions at higher levels in the organization.

VII. Adjournment: 1:07 p.m.




ASAIL Meeting, Sunday, April 14th, 2002 (Native American Literature Symposium)

MINUTES

I. Meeting called to order at 8:45 a.m.
1. Officers present: Allen, Justice, Powell (Editor)



II. President's Comments
1. Allen addressed journal changes; introduced Powell

III. SAIL Editor's Comments (informal)
1. Powell noted the slow process of transition from the earlier editorial system; also noted the developing improvements:

* Manuscript reviewers now have deadlines for submitting their reviews;
* Quality control: returning more manuscripts that do not meet the needs of the journal; more Revise and Resubmit essays;
* Regularizing book review lengths; longer book review essays will now be going through the manuscript review process;
*  Building credibility through improvement of journal and editorial quality;· Physical appearance of SAIL will change to better reflect the professional nature of the journal;
*  Editor and editorial board are in the process of negotiating with or developing proposals for a university press to begin printing the journal (three possible options include UP of Nebraska, UP of Minnesota, and Michigan State UP).

2. Powell provided an update about the editorial board and institutional structure of SAIL:

*  NEW HOME FOR SAIL: The journal's new home (beginning in July) will be the Department of American Thought and Language at Michigan State University; MSU has pledged significant institutional support for SAIL.
*  BOOK REVIEW EDITOR: Eric Gary Anderson has resigned as Book Review Editor; P. Jane Hafen, of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, has been selected as the new Book Review Editor.
*  EDITORIAL BOARD: Gwen Griffin, of Minnesota State University, Mankato, has been selected as the newest member of the editorial board.

3. Powell discussed the need to unlink ASAIL membership rates from SAIL subscriptions, as this would likely be the only way to retain independent ASAIL funds for other projects and opportunities.

4. In answer to a query about book reviews that would not be published in the journal, Powell reminded the audience that ASAIL Notes, compiled by Robert Nelson (ASAIL Treasurer and webmaster), are available on-line ( http://facultystaff.richmond.edu/~rnelson/asail).



IV. President's Comments (informal)
1. Allen expanded on Powell's points:

*  ASAIL does not, at present, have nonprofit organization status; we are now constrained because we need a permanent address--this issue will be resolved once we have contracted with a university press.
*  Nonprofit status would change our budgetary status and give us many options for money, including providing scholarships to graduate students, providing honoraria to Native writers at conferences, etc.
*  We must consider instituting formal budgetary policies and procedures.
*  We should consider unhooking membership from the journal. When the move to a UP takes places, the present rates of $25 will go entirely for subscriptions; thus, we should consider raising some or all fees (esp. institutional) to help defray costs yet still maintain a reasonable price for subscribers and Association members.

2. Allen discussed other issues facing ASAIL at present:

*  REPRESENTATION: Some members of ASAIL are claiming to represent the organization in assorted venues; official representation should be through elected officers.
*  PUBLICITY: ASAIL/SAIL are still rather obscure; Allen requested that members think of ways to let others know we exist, to increase membership numbers, and to broaden involvement in both the Association and the journal. SAIL is now and should remain the primary venue for cutting-edge scholarship in the discipline, and Allen asked that members think of ways to advertise this status.
*  ELECTIONS AND TERMS: Allen asked that members think about the following options:
    A. Extension of terms: From two to three or four years?
    B. Transition: Should the vice-president automatically become the president, thus ensuring continuity and stability?
    C. Location of Meetings: Rather than continue to have the primary business meetings at MLA, perhaps move these to the Native American Literature Symposium, thus allowing for more representation and diversity?
    D. Venue: Should we consider a different way of performing elections to ensure the broadest representation possible, such as internet voting or mail-in ballots?
    E. MLA: We will not surrender our MLA presence; we will continue to participate in the MLA structure through sponsoring and developing sessions, etc.. These changes would enable us to perform our necessary business in a venue more suitable to the discipline, and preventing other business (such as the Division meeting) from conflicting with ASAIL concerns.

V. Commentary (informal)
1. LeAnne Howe suggested having the primary meeting at the Native American Literature Symposium, thus encouraging live voting.

2. Allen agreed, noting that the ASAIL meeting at the Symposium might increase the reputation and general participation of both.

3. Powell recommended that the organization put the slate of candidates on the listserve.

4. Susan Berry Brill de Ramirez noted her long history with the Association, and she recommended that now is the time for the organization's independence.

5. Gwen Griffin observed that the MLA is disrespectful of Native voices--it is too big, impersonal, and disconnected from the issues and concerns of Native American literary studies. She recommended that we think of ways to prepare our own students for the job market, as we are the most qualified to do so.

6. Allen agreed, suggesting that we think of MLA as the margin rather than the center of scholarly activity in this discipline. He also noted that an Indian venue is important for the work we do, and asked that audience members provide input on these matters via the ASAIL listserve.
     Allen noted that ASAIL has a number of options for next year's symposium, including sponsoring a SAIL issue devoted to or including a follow-up extension of the symposium; thus, the journal becomes a vehicle to highlight the symposium and the organization; introduced Griffin in her role as coordinator of the Native American Literature Symposium.



VI. Griffin's Comments (informal)
1. Griffin noted the importance of an Indian venue for the purposes of the scholarly work in Native American studies. She discussed the difficulties of the ALA Puerto Vallarta conference, particularly its difficult racial dynamics that worked to erase Native presence.

2. Griffin related the history of the conference and gave reasons for the disassociation of the Symposium from the ALA: for reasons above (V.1), expense, and because of the lack of institutional financial accountability. This year's conference broke even due to the new structure and the commitment of the Clan Mothers to fiscal responsibility.

3. Griffin discussed the Indian-centeredness of the Symposium, and acknowledged the generosity of the special guest writers and speakers, all of whom participated without charge, as well as the strong financial support of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Nation, which provided rooms and other assistance for Native students and elders. She shared her hope that the Symposium would, within five years, be the premiere event in Native American literary studies.



VII. Public Commentary (informal)
1. Linda Helstern recommended forming an ancillary committee to provide paid readings for visiting speakers/artists in nearby area venues.

2. de Ramirez suggested raising money for students, from tribes and other sources, to go to other meetings and symposia, such as MLA.

3. Powell responded to Ramirez, noting that ASAIL does provide some financial assistance in this regard and may be able to provide more in the future. She stated that ASAIL should have its own endowment to be able to provide more of these opportunities.

4. Howe, in responding to de Ramirez, asserted that ASAIL should not be competing for tribal money, and that individual students could speak to their own tribes for this funding.

5. Lisa Tatonetti suggested adding a donation note on registration forms for donations for Native student and elder assistance; another option might be to sponsor a Native student and/or elder.

6. Diane Way offered to request her 501(c)3 organization to provide their nonprofit status to ASAIL until we get our own.

7. Griffin discussed possible dates for next year's Symposium.

8. After brief discussion about the drawbacks of changing the date--too many conferences in spring; must avoid MELUS and 4 Cs--general consensus was to keep the Symposium at approximately the same time of year. Some participants discussed the issue of panel overlap and its inevitability with a growing event such as this.

9. Allen recommended more plenary sessions, some after-dinner panels.

10. Griffin agreed to try to book a lounge/hospitality room each night.

11. Tatonetti recommended a student paper competition.

12. Ginny Carney noted that we should avoid being like every other conference; she highlighted the importance of this Symposium's Indian individuality and announced her hope that we will keep the event's values and distinctiveness intact.

13. Griffin agreed with Carney, adding that we are not here to grandstand, pad resumes, or get tenure, but that we are here to ensure the responsibility of scholars and scholarship in Native American literary studies.



VII. Meeting adjourned at 10:05 a.m.






  Contact: Robert Nelson
This page was last modified on: 25 June 2014