{REVISED 18 April 2014}

A Guide to Native American Studies Programs
in the United States and Canada



Robert M. Nelson, Editor



 

Some years ago, in the Fall of 1993, the Association for the Study of American Literatures published a 30-page guide to Native American Studies programs in the U.S., compiled and edited by former ASAIL President Franchot Ballinger. This new Guide to Native American Studies Programs in the United States and Canada represents an attempt to update and expand upon Professor Ballinger's pioneering work. In accordance with a 1995 ASAIL resolution, it is being published both in hardcopy form and in electronic form, so as to be available not only to ASAIL members but also to non-members, compliments of the Association.

I wish to take this opportunity to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of two SAIL Editorial Assistants, Amy Davidson (1995-96) and Corrie Anderson (1996-97), who in addition to their other duties put in many hours of overtime gathering and regathering, collating and recollating information from a variety of sources including questionnaires, follow-up letters and phone calls, and worldwide websites. Thanks also to Karen Strom at University of Massachusetts, who read the final draft of this guide and provided or corrected many of the URL addresses for program websites.

Our dream was to provide a comprehensive survey of U.S. and Canadian Native American Studies programs being offered as majors, minors, and certifications at the baccalaureate level or above, using (with some slight modifications and additions) Professor Ballinger's earlier categories of information on each program. And although we have made a considerable effort to locate, contact, and acquire information about Native American Studies programs (by whatever title: Native American Studies and American Indian Studies are the most common designations, though there are others) at all North American baccalaureate-granting institutions, readers should keep in mind that the Guide is still far from complete. There are a number of reasons for this, and I'd point to two in particular. First, several programs that we located declined to provide information; in those cases we have elected not to list that school or that program. Exceptions to this rule are programs having substantial www sites; in these cases we have attempted to construct full or partial entries from information made available at those sites. Second, we suspect that we did not succeed in locating all the existing programs. It is thus possible, even likely, that several substantial programs were never contacted by us in the first place.

We are working on ways to correct these problems in order to increase the accuracy and comprehensiveness, not only of possible future print versions, but also of this electronic version of the guide. Because this website can be conveniently upgraded more frequently than a print guide, it has the potential to become the most reliable source of such information available anywhere, anytime, to everyone. For these reasons, I am hoping that anyone who knows of a program that is not represented in this publication, or who knows of any inaccuracies herein, will contact me at rnelson@richmond.edu or fill out the survey form we have designed for this purpose, to let us know about any errors, omissions, or updates in Native Studies programs being offered in North America at the baccalaureate level or higher.

(A note on alphabetization: consistent with PMLA Directory style, for purposes of ordering entries alphabetically we have ignored "University of" and "College of" openers to names of institutions, with the exception that "State University of New York" entries have been entered as though they were "SUNY" followed by local campus designation.)


Native American Studies Programs by Region

Eastern U.S.
CT: U of Connecticut
FL: U of Florida
GA: U of Georgia
MA: Amherst C
U of Massachusetts
Hampshire College
Mount Holyoke C
Smith C
ME:U of Maine
NH: Dartmouth C
NY: Colgate U
Cornell U
St. Lawrence U
SUNY at Buffalo
SUNY at Cortland
SUNY at Fredonia
SUNY, C at Oswego
SUNY at Potsdam
Syracuse U
NC: UNC-Chapel Hill
UNC at Pembroke
UNC-Wilmington
North Carolina State
Western Carolina U
VA: George Mason U
Virginia Tech
WV: West Virginia U



Southcentral U.S.
OK:
East Central U
Northeastern S U
U of Oklahoma
Oklahoma S U
Southeastern Oklahoma S U
U of Sci. and Arts of Okla.

Northcentral U.S.
IL: U of Illinois at Chicago
U of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Southern Illinois U Edwardsville
IN: Indiana U
Valparaiso U
IA: U of Iowa
KS: Haskell Indian Nations U
U of Kansas
KY: Northern Kentucky U
MI: U of Michigan
Michigan S U
Northern Michigan U
MN: Augsburg C
Bemidji S U
C of St. Scholastica
U of Minnesota Duluth
U of Minnesota, Twin Cities
St. Cloud State U
Southwest Minnesota S U
NE: Creighton U
U of Nebraska, Lincoln
U of Nebraska at Omaha
ND:Minot S U
U of North Dakota
OH: Ohio S U
SD: Black Hills S U
U of South Dakota
South Dakota S U
WI: Northland C
U of Wisconsin, Eau Claire
U of Wisconsin Green Bay
U of Wisconsin, Madison
U of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
U of Wisconsin - Stevens Point
U of Wisconsin - Superior
Western U.S.
AK:
U of Alaska, Fairbanks
AZ: U of Arizona
Arizona State U
Northern Arizona U
CA: U of California, Berkeley
U of California, Davis
U of California, Irvine
U of California, Los Angeles
U of California, Riverside
C S U, Chico
C S U, East Bay
C S U, Long Beach
C S U, Northridge
C S U, Sacramento
C S U, San Marcos
Humboldt S U
Mills C
San Diego S U
San Francisco S U
Stanford U
CO: U of Colorado, Boulder
Fort Lewis C
HI: U of Hawai'i at Hilo
U of Hawai'i at Mänoa
ID: U of Idaho
Idaho State U
MT: Montana S U
Montana S U Billings
Montana S U Northern
U of Montana
NM: U of New Mexico
New Mexico S U
OR: Portland S U
Southern Oregon U
UT: Brigham Young U
WA: Eastern Washington U
The Evergreen S C
U of Washington
Western Washington U
WY: U of Wyoming
Canada
AB:
U of Alberta
Athabaska U
U of Calgary
U of Lethbridge
BC: U of British Columbia
U of Northern British Columbia
Simon Fraser U
Vancouver Island U
U of Victoria
MN: Brandon U
U of Manitoba
U of Winnipeg
NB: St Thomas U
NS: Cape Breton U
ON: Algoma U
Brock U
Lakehead U
Laurentian U: see U of Sudbury
McMaster U
U of Sudbury
U of Toronto
Trent U
U of Western Ontario
U of Ottowa
York U
SK: U of Regina: see First Nations U
U of Saskatchewan
First Nations U of Canada (formerly SIFC)
QC: Concordia U
U Laval



Note: The following institutions also have Native Studies programs but have not yet provided us with information on their programs; they are linked to their home pages rather than to Guide entries.
U British Columbia - Okanagan
Brown U
U California, Santa Barbara
Central Michigan U
Central Washington U
Emory U
Indiana U-Purdue U Fort Wayne
Loyola Marymount U
Miami U
Missouri S U
U of Oregon
Princeton U
U du Québec a Chicoutimi
Queen's U
Shingwauk U [pending]
U of Texas, Austin
University College of the North
Valdosta S U
Vassar C
Wilfried Laurier U


Degrees, Certifications, etc. Granted
Ph.D., M.A.

U of Alaska (M.A. in Rural Development)
U of Alberta (M.A.)

U of Arizona (Ph.D., M.A.)
U of California, Berkeley (Ph.D. w/ concentration in N.A. Studies)
U of California, Davis (M.A., Ph.D., D.E.)
U of California, Los Angeles (M.A.)
U of California, Riverside (major or minor Ph.D. fields)
Cornell U (Graduate Minor in American Indian Studies)
The Evergreen State C (M.A. in Environmental Studies, Teaching)
First Nations U of Canada (Special Case M.A.)
U of Hawai'i at Hilo (M.A. in Hawaiian Language and Literature; M.A. in Indigenous Language and Culture Education; Ph.D. in Hawaiian and Indigenous Language and Culture Revitalization)
U of Hawai'i at Mänoa (M.A.)
U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Graduate Minor in American Indian and Indigenous Studies)
Indiana U (Ph.D. minor)
U of Kansas (M.A., graduate certificate in Indigenous Studies; Joint M.A./J.D. program through the KU Law School)
U of Lethbridge (Special Case Masters)
U Manitoba (M.A., Ph.D.)
U of Massachusetts (certificate)
U of Minnesota Duluth (Master of Tribal Administration and Governance)
Montana S U (M.A.; On-line Graduate Certificate in Native American Studies)
U of Nebraska at Omaha (M.A. w/ NA emphasis; graduate minor)
U of Northern British Columbia (M.A.)
U of Oklahoma (M.A.)
U Saskatchewan (M.A., special case Ph.D.)
U of South Dakota (M.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies)
SUNY at Buffalo (M.A. and Ph.D. in American Studies with a Focus in Indigenous/Native American Studies)
Trent U (Ph.D. , M.A.)
U of Victoria (M.A.; Ph.D.)
U of Washington (M.A. in Indigenous Documentary Film Making)
Western Carolina U (M.A. in History, Cherokee Studies Track)
U of Winnipeg (M.A.)
U of Wyoming (Ph.D. w/ minor in American Indian Studies)


Baccalaureate Major
U of Alaska, Fairbanks
U of Alberta
Algoma U
Arizona State U
Augsburg C
Bemidji State U
Black Hills State U
Brandon U
Brock U
U Calgary
U of California, Berkeley
U of California, Davis
U of California, Riverside
Cape Breton U
U of British Columbia
Colgate U
Concordia U
Creighton U
Dartmouth C
East Central U
The Evergreen State
First Nations U of Canada
Fort Lewis C
Haskell Indian Nations U
U of Hawai'i at Hilo
U of Hawai'i at Mänoa
Humboldt State U
Lakehead U
Laurentian U
U of Lethbridge
U of Manitoba
McMaster U
Mills C
U of Minnesota Duluth
U of Minnesota, Twin Cities
U of Montana
U of Nebraska, Lincoln
U of New Mexico
UNC-Chapel Hill
UNC at Pembroke
U of North Dakota
Northeastern State U
Northern Arizona U
U of Northern British Columbia
Northland C
U of Oklahoma
U of Ottawa
St Thomas U
U of Saskatchewan
Simon Fraser U
U of South Dakota
South Dakota S U
Stanford U
Trent U
Vancouver Island U
U of Washington
U of Western Ontario
U of Winnipeg
U of Wisconsin, Eau Claire
U of Wisconsin Green Bay
U of Wyoming
York U


Baccalaureate Minor
U of Alaska, Fairbanks
U of Arizona
Bemidji State U
Black Hills State U
Brigham Young U (interdisciplinary)
U of California, Davis
U of California, Irvine
U of California, Los Angeles
U of California, Riverside
C S U, Chico
C S U, East Bay
C S U, Long Beach
C S U, Northridge (interdisciplinary)
C S U, Sacramento
C S U, San Marcos
Cape Breton U
U of British Columbia
Colgate U
U of Colorado, Boulder
Concordia U
U of Connecticut
Cornell U
Creighton U
Dartmouth C
East Central U
Eastern Washington U
U of Florida
Fort Lewis C
George Mason U
U of Hawai'i at Hilo
Humboldt State U
U of Idaho
Idaho S U
U of Illinois at Chicago
U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Indiana U
U of Iowa
Lakehead U
U of Maine
U Manitoba
McMaster U
U of Michigan
U of Minnesota Duluth
U of Minnesota, Twin Cities (interdisciplinary)
Minot S U
U of Montana
Montana State U
Montana S U Billings
Montana S U Northern
U of Nebraska, Lincoln
U of Nebraska at Omaha
U of New Mexico
New Mexico State U
UNC-Chapel Hill
UNC at Pembroke
UNC-Wilmington
North Carolina State
U of North Dakota
Northeastern State U
Northern Arizona U
Northern Kentucky U
Northern Michigan U
Northland C
Ohio State U
U of Oklahoma
Oklahoma State U
Portland State U
St. Cloud State U
St Lawrence U
C of St. Scholastica
San Diego State U
San Francisco State U
Simon Fraser U
U of South Dakota
South Dakota S U
Southeastern Oklahoma S U
Southern Illinois U Edwardsville
Southern Oregon U
Southwest Minnesota S U
Stanford U
SUNY at Cortland
SUNY at Fredonia (interdisciplinary)
SUNY, C at Oswego
SUNY at Potsdam
Syracuse U
U of Toronto
Valparaiso U
Virginia Tech
U of Washington
West Virginia U
Western Carolina U
U of Western Ontario
Western Washington U
U of Wisconsin, Eau Claire
U of Wisconsin Green Bay
U of Wisconsin - Stevens Point
U of Wisconsin, Superior
U of Wyoming
York U


concentration etc.

Athabaska U
Black Hills State U (concentration in Lakota Culture)
C S U, Hayward (option)
C S U, Long Beach (certificate)
C S U, Sacramento
Cape Breton U
Colgate U
Cornell U
Five Colleges (certificate)
U of Florida (concentration)
George Washington U (Interdisciplinary Minor)
U of Georgia (undergraduate and graduate certificates)
U of Iowa (undergraduate and graduate certificates)
Laurentian U (Pre-Law Certificate)
U Laval (certificate)
U of Massachusetts
Michigan S U (Specialization)
Minot S U
Montana S U Billings (BSLS w/concentration)
U of New Mexico (Interdisciplinary Specialization)
UNC-Chapel Hill
UNC at Pembroke
Northern Arizona U (certificate)
U of Northern British Columbia
Southern Oregon U (certificate)
SUNY at Buffalo
U of Washington (B.A. Anthropology w/ emphasis in AIS)
Western Carolina U (graduate certificate in Cherokee Studies)
U of Wisconsin, Madison (certificate)
U of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (certificate; interdisciplinary degree)
York U (certificate)


University of Alaska, Fairbanks

title of program: Alaska Native Studies and Rural Development

name\title of head\director: Miranda right, Director; Jenny Bell-Jones, Program Chair

degrees granted: B.A. (major and minor) in 1) Alaska Natives Studies and 2) Rural Development; M.A. in Rural Development

description of program offerings: Alaska Native Studies and Rural Development degree programs are designed to educate a new generation of leaders for Alaska. The department offers BA degrees in Alaska Native Studies and in Rural Development and an MA degree in Rural Development. These degrees can be earned either on the Fairbanks campus or through distance delivery. Undergraduate degree students develop a concentration within the major. Students in the programs gain a broad understanding of Alaska's cultural heritages, relationship to the global economy and an appreciation for sustainable development strategies. Students also learn specific tools essential for community leadership, including business plan and grant proposal writing, community visioning and planning processes, computer business applications, and project management and evaluation techniques. Graduates typically take positions with tribal and municipal governments, fisheries, tourism, and other private businesses, Native corporations, regional health corporations or non-profits, and state/federal agencies.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native education, tribal political organization, social change, oral and written literatures, Native dance and drama, federal Indian law, Aboriginal rights.

resources available: In addition to having a high number of Native students, the University is close to tribal groups, owns an extensive collection of audio tapes, is a center of major contemporary political and cultural activities, provides Native dance classes, has an Elder-In-Residence program and sponsors a yearly performing arts festival featuring Native dance and theater.

financial aid available to students: Aid is available through UAF Financial Aid Office rather than through the department.

number of students in program: 8 majors, 15 minors.

distance learning: Some ANS courses are offered through distance delivery. See The Center for Distance Education (www.uaf.edu/educ/distance/center.html ) , College of Rural and Community Development (www.alaska.edu/rural), and the Center for Cross Cultural Studies (www.uaf.edu/cxcs). The Department also supports a M.A. in Cross-cultural Studies which is delivered primarily through Distance Education: see http://www.uaf.edu/cxcs/masters.html.


University of Alberta

title of program: Faculty of Native Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Brendan Hokowhitu, Dean

degrees granted: M.A. Native Studies; B.A. in Native Studies; B.A. (Native Studies) / B.Ed. Five-Year Combined Degree Program (Elementary/Secondary Routes); B.A. in Native Studies; Bachelor of Science in Environmental Conservation Sciences/Combined degree; Certificate in Aboriginal Governance and Partnership; Certificate in Aboriginal Recreation and Sport.

description of program offerings: Cree Languages, Historical and Contemporary Perspectives in Native Studies, Aboriginal Governments and Politics, Urban Issues, Treaties and Land Claims, Aboriginal Economic Development, Oral Traditions, Native Art, Perspectives on Aboriginal Health and Well-Being, Native Land Use, Métis Politics, Urban Aboriginal Issues and Identities, Aboriginal people and the Canadian state and law.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Aboriginal Governance; Indian treaties in Canada, Northwest and Yukon territories, Fort Chipewyan, Blackfoot, Cree, women in Native history, Canadian history and politics, post-1870 historical geographies of Aboriginal people, justice issues and Métis history.

resources available: Native Studies Student Association, Native Studies Alumni Association, Strynadka/Brady Reading Room.

financial aid available to students: (780) 492-3483; students may also contact the Aboriginal Student Services Centre at (780) 492-5677 for information.

number of students in program: 142 for 2013/2014.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Algoma University

title of program: Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe Language degree)

name\title of head\director: Howard Webkamigad, Professor of Anishinaabemowin

degree(s) granted: 3 year B.A.

description of program offerings: Study of the Ojibwe language in the Great Lakes Region.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Fluent Ojibwe language speaker.

resources available: Anishinaabe Initiatives Division of Algoma University with four staff: Director of Anishinaabe Student Success, Anishinaabe Student Advisor, Anishinaabe Events Coordinator and Anishinaabe Outreach Officer.

financial aid available to students: Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP)

number of students in program: 20 students

distance learning: no


Amherst College

[See listing for Five Colleges, Inc.]


University of Arizona

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Ronald Trosper, Head

degrees granted: M.A., Ph.D., Ph.D. minor, J.D./M.A. concurrent degree in Law and American Indian Studies; undergraduate minor.

description of program offerings: We offer a full complement of coursework leading to an undergraduate minor and several degrees: a master of arts (MA); a joint MA and law (JD); and the doctorate (Ph.D.) including AIS as a minor area of concentration for other UA Ph.D. degrees. We have five specializations within our curriculum -- Education, Law and Policy, Literature, Natural Resources Management and Societies and Culture -- that are supported with coursework and research programs.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: We have 35 world-class faculty with various levels of assignments and interactions with AIS, including 11 that are fully or partially funded by AIS and/or other departments such as Anthropology, English, Family and Community Medicine, German Studies, History, Language, Reading and Culture, Law, Linguistics, Natural Resources, Psychology, Sociology, the Udall Center for Public Policy and its Native Nations Institute -- and our collaborations keep growing.

resources available: Native student centers: Native American Student Affairs; American Indian Graduate Center. Clubs: Tribal People United; American Indian Studies Graduate Student Council; Native American Law Student Association; Native American Business Organization; AISES (American Indian Science and Engineering Society).

financial aid available to students: Teaching Assistantships and Waivers available.

number of students in program: 48 graduate students

distance learning: [information not provided]


Arizona State University

title of program: American Indian Studies Program

department in which housed: College of Public Programs

name\title of head\director: Dr. Eddie F. Brown, Director

degree(s) granted: B.S.

description of program offerings: The American Indian Studies program emphasizes American Indian sovereignty and the intellectual and applied study of American Indian law and policy; nation building and economic development; and arts, languages, and cultures.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian law and policy, crime and justice, sovereignty, race and stereotypes, American Indian history and culture, American Indian repatriation, traditional music, 20th century American Indian history, ethnohistory of American Indians, American Indian gender and sexuality, urban Indians, cultural diversity, higher education and administration, American Indians epistemology and philosophy.

resources available: American Indian Institute, Center for Indian Education, Indian Legal Program, Labriola National American Indian Data Center; American Indian Council, American Indian Science and Engineering Society, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Social Work, American Indian Studies Student Organization, Dine Language Club, Native American Business Organization, Native American Law Student Organization, American Indian Students United for Nursings.

financial aid available to students: [Information not provided.]

number of students in program: 246; number of Majors: 50; number of graduates to date 16.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Athabasca University

title of program: Centre for World Indigenous Knowledge and Research

name\title of head\director: Priscilla Campeau, Chair

degree(s) granted: B.A. major, minor, or certificate in Canadian Studies w/ concentration in Canadian Indigenous and Ethnic Studies; Bachelor of Management - Indigenous Nations and Organizations (major), Bachelor of Management - Indigenous Nations and Organizations (major, Post-diploma)

description of program offerings: Our aim is to foster the intellectual growth of our students through quality post-secondary education that is determined by the philosophies and values of Indigenous peoples.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Indigenous Governance, Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Management, Indigenous Law

resources available: Website resource library, student support, community services, centre, scholarships/bursaries and students association.

financial aid available to students: Bursaries and Scholarships.

number of students in program: We have an ongoing registration throughout the year. Athabasca University serves over 38,000 students. We offer over 700 courses in more than 90 undergraduate and graduate programs

distance learning: Athabasca University is Canada's leading distance education and online university. Our delivery modes are individualized study, online study and grouped study. You may take our courses and programs regardless of location. For undergraduate individualized study courses, there are no admission deadlines; students may enroll year-round. The only admission requirement is 16 years of age regardless of your previous education. Athabasca University is an accredited degree-granting institution. You can complete a program or take a course(s) which may be transferred to most other post secondary institutions.


Augsburg College

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Eric Buffalohead, Chair

degree(s) granted: B.A. Major

description of program offerings: American Indian Studies is a major that gives students the opportunity to learn about the original, indigenous cultures of North America. Students will be provided with a multidisciplinary understanding of the history and present situation of American Indians. The program emphasizes the interrelations among history, culture, language, literature, the arts, philosophy, religion, political and social forces, and the legal status and sovereignty of American Indians. This course of study exposes students to the richness and beauty of North American Indian cultures.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Hollywood and Indigenous film, Native American Women, Contemporary Issues--local and global, Traditional and Contemporary Art, Literature, History, Storytelling, Religious and Philosophical Thought. As a group, our faculty has worked to provide experiential educational opportunities through travel seminars to central American and across local regions, through internships and applied research for local organizations.

resources available: Augsburg Native American Film Series, Native American Writer's Series, Augsburg Indigenous Student Association, American Indian Student Support Program, Storytelling Forum, on-campus speakers, and a growing collection of Native American film, literature, art, history, and cultural texts in our college library.

financial aid available to students: Contact Jennifer Simon 612-330-1144 simonj@augsburg.edu

number of students in program: 14

distance learning: no


Bemidji State University

title of program: Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Benjamin V. Burgess, Ph.D., Coordinator

degrees granted: B.A. in Indian Studies (major and minor); minor in Ojibwe language.

description of program offerings: American Indian history, government, and visual arts.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: [Information not provided.]

resources available: New building: American Indian Resource Center, The Indian Student Services program, the Council of Indian Students, an AISES chapter, two library collections (the American Indian Bibliography and the NIEA Collection), access to powwows, the Ojibwe Art Expo, and the Oshkaabewis Native Journal. BSU is located at the center of three reservations: White Earth, Red Lake, and Leech Lake. Resource people from the reservations are used as teachers and demonstrators. The majority of students at BSU are drawn from these reservations.

financial aid available to students: Available, contact: Admissions Office, (218)755-2040.

number of students in program: about 200.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Black Hills State University

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Urla Marcus, Director

degrees granted: Major and Minor in American Indian Studies; concentration in Lakota Culture.

description of program offerings: [See website.]

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Lakota Language and Culture, Indian Law, Oral Literature, Contemporary Indian Literature, Contemporary Indian Issues, Indian Women, Indian History.

resources available: Library - Case Western Library Collection, Arrow Publications, E.Y. Berry Collection, Emory Lakota Recordings; two student Indian organizations: Lakota Omniciye, AISES.

financial aid available to students: Yes.

number of students in program: Approximately 20 majors, 50 minors.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Brandon University

title of program: Department of Native Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Darrell Racine

degree(s) granted: B.A. major and minor

description of program offerings: We offer a considerable number of Aboriginal language courses, with an emphasis on Dakota, Cree and Ojibway. Our core areas include Native Philosophy/Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Indigenous Perspectives on Law and Governance, Indigenous Health, as well as Native Literature, Art and Oral Narratives. There is also a Clinical Specialization stream in the Department and a growing Metis Studies emphasis.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Addictions; Aboriginal Health and Wellness; Aboriginal Identity; Indigenous Languages and Linguistics; Genocide and Indigenous Peoples; Indigenous Knowledge Systems; Indigenous Perspectives on Law; Indigenous Research Methodologies; Museology; Native Women and Feminism; Native Philosophy; Natives and the Justice System; Residential Schools; Sovereignty and Self- Government; Treaties and Treaty-Making

resources available: We have an Indigenous Peoples' Centre, a ceremonial room, an Aboriginal Students, Council as part of the BU Students' Association, a library with very extensive holdings in the area of Native Studies, the Canadian Journal of Native Studies is published here, and we have a publishing 'house' - Bear Paw Publishing.

financial aid available to students: Various scholarships are offered.

number of students in program: c. 40 majors and minors

distance learning: Yes, and our offerings in this area our growing, with an aim to make a complete online-degree program available.


Brigham Young University

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Department of History

name\title of head\director: Jay Buckley, Director

degree(s) granted: B.A. interdisciplinary minor

description of program offerings: Core classes in History and English and elective classes in Anthropology, English, History, Humanities, Linguistics, Sociology, and religion.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American West, American Indian literature, American Indian History, Anthropology, Sociology, Northeast and Mississippi Valley, languages: Shoshone, Numic, Salish, Navajo.

resources available: Indian communities nearby; Harold A. Cedartree Memorial Pow-Wow (March) [http://multicultural.byu.edu/pow-wo w-volunteers]; Harold B. Lee Library, one of the top research libraries in the West [http://www.lib.byu.edu/]; Multicultural Student Services [http://multicultural.byu.edu/]; Native American Outreach Program [http://ce.byu.edu/cw/cwnative/]; Reservation Outreach Programs [http://ce.byu.edu/cw/native/vision.cfm]; SOAR (Summer of Academic Refinement) [http://multicultural.byu.edu/what-soar]; The Eagle's Eye (quarterly publication) [http://multicultural.byu.edu/eagles-eye]; Tribe of Many Feathers (campus club) [http://sc.byu.edu/organization.cfm?Or g ID=270].

financial aid available to students: Numerous scholarship opportunities; SOAR program; Multicultural Financial Awards, Multicultural Scholarships, and Career Training are available. American Indian Services (http://www.americanindianservices.org/ ) makes educational opportunities possible for qualifying Native American students who otherwise could not afford it. We provide more than 2300 scholarships annually. Students qualify for participation based on academic merit as well as financial need. The Result: Native American graduates who will lead their tribal communities into a hopeful future.

number of students in program: c. 50; about 200 Indian students enrolled at BYU.

distance learning: not presently available for entire minor.


University of British Columbia

title of program: First Nations Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Daniel Heath Justice, Chair

degree(s) granted: B.A. major and minor

description of program offerings: Curriculum is interdisciplinary and students are able to choose from a wide variety of courses across the university. Core curriculum is designed to assist students in integrating their studies around core issues in Indigenous thought, ethical research methods, critical analysis, and engagement with local and global indigenous contexts and concerns, and towards developing their capacity to complete the capstone fourth-year research practicum. The research practicum partners students with community organizations that identify research needs that students address by designing projects. negotiating their terms, and completing their implementation.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Core faculty currently have expertise in Aboriginal politics, international Indigenous rights movements, literature and media, Indigenous feminism, critical theory, and documentary and oral history. Many other forms of expertise are available through interdisciplinary linkages.

resources available: Program is supported by the Xwi7xwa Library, a branch of the university library with core expertise in Indigenous topics, classifications, and search techniques, the First Nations house of learning, and various programs, staff, and faculty across the university.

financial aid available to students: Financial aid is available through university sources.

number of students in program: Approximately 250, with about 25 declared majors.

distance learning: Program has online resources, but does not offer online courses.


Brock University

title of program:Tecumseh Centre for Aboriginal Research and Education, Faculty of Education

name\title of head\director: Dr. Michael Manley-Casimir, Director

degree(s) granted: Bachelor Degree in Aboriginal Adult Education; Bachelor of Education - Primary and Junior (Aboriginal)

description of program offerings: Bachelor of Education in Aboriginal Adult Education Program: The Bachelor of Education in Aboriginal Adult Education Program (ABADED Program) as well as a Certificate in Aboriginal Adult Education is designed to enhance the abilities of individuals working with, or aspiring to work with Aboriginal adult populations in a variety of educational/training contexts. The ABADED Program incorporates Aboriginal learning preferences and relies on a wide reflection of Aboriginal cultures and traditions. This community based curriculum model relies on qualified local Aboriginal educators to facilitate the learner's educational journey. Courses are offered in a facilitated learning cohort model, face-to-face at numerous locations across the province. Bachelor of Education-Primary and Junior (Aboriginal): The Bachelor of Education degree for students interested in teaching at the Primary/Junior level (grades K-6). The program incorporates Aboriginal learning preferences and cultural diversity. This community-based curriculum model relies on qualified local Aboriginal educators to facilitate the learner's educational journey. Courses are offered in a facilitated learning cohort model, face-to-face at locations across the province. Successful graduates will receive a Bachelor of Education degree. Upon successful completion of a teacher education program, teacher candidates are normally recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for membership and to receive their Ontario Certificate of Qualification. Native Teacher Education Program: The Native Teacher Education Program for students interested in teaching at the Primary/Junior level (grades K-6). This program incorporates Aboriginal learning preferences and cultural diversity. This community-based curriculum model relies on qualified local Aboriginal educators, as well as Brock University faculty. The program leads to the Ontario Certificate of Qualification for elementary teaching. This program runs on weekends over a period of three years.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: N/A.

resources available: Aboriginal Student Services; Aboriginal Student Organization.

financial aid available to students: N/A.

number of students in program: [Information not provided.]

distance learning: All programs housed within the Tecumseh Centre are offered as distance learning.


University of Calgary

title of program: International Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Aruna Srivastava

degree(s) granted: B.A.

description of program offerings: One of a very few programs in Canada that offers international component to indigenous studies. The program incorporates a strong experiential component. A core set of Indigenous Studies courses are offered and students are then required to take courses from cognate fields, e.g., Sociology, History, Anthropology, Literature. Students can also transfer courses from or take courses in nearby First Nations colleges or other universities for credit at the University of Calgary and meet requirements for the International Indigenous Studies program.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Indigenous Ways of Knowing; Research and Protocol; Literature, Film and Art; indigenous law and governance; comparative international indigenous perspectives; indigenous ecologies.

resources available: Native Student Services provides additional resources for students, e.g., student organizations, work stations, study rooms, meeting spaces, counseling.

financial aid available to students: Students should contact The Native Centre at http://www.ucalgary.ca/nativecentre/ or the main university website at www.ucalgary.ca for information on financial aid.

number of students in program: 18 undergraduate student majors, 14 students with a minor. The core classes offered by the International Indigenous Studies program are "capped" so as to keep the classes small.

distance learning: No; some blended (mixed online and face to face).


University of California, Berkeley

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Shari Huhndorf, Coordinator

degrees granted: B.A. (major); UC-B also offers Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies with a concentration in Native American studies.

description of program offerings: The Native American Studies Program exists to broaden the understanding of students interested in the history, literature, culture, and contemporary situations of Native Americans. The curriculum has been structured to provide courses that deal with both historical, literary, and cultural analysis of Native American cultures and contemporary legal and social institutions that affect Native American life. Courses include such offerings as: Native American Studies Reading and Composition, Native American Literature, Native Americans in the Twentieth Century, Native American Law, Native American Tribal Governments, Native American Economic Development, Theories and Methods in Native American Studies, Native American Women, Native American Philosophy, Native American Cinema, and various courses in Native American oral and written literatures. The program not only stresses sound academic preparation in the classroom but also allows students the flexibility to take part in community-oriented education through field work or studies directed toward community situations and problems.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology, History, Literature, Law, Cultural Studies, Visual Culture.

resources available: Native American Library, Hearst Museum of Anthropology, California Academy of Sciences, Inter-tribal Friendship House, National Indian Justice Center, Bay Area Indian Agency Representatives, American Indian Film Institute.

financial aid available to students: Shirley Martin Scholarship Fund.

number of students in program: 50-60 undergraduate, 10 in the graduate program.

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of California, Davis

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Inés Hernández-Avila, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. (major and minor); M.A.; Ph.D.; M.A. and Ph.D. w/ Designated Emphasis in Native American Studies for doctoral students enrolled in graduate programs in English, History, Spanish, Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Sociology, Psychology, and Performance Studies.

description of program offerings: The Department of Native American Studies focuses on the indigenous peoples of the Americas, on the peoples, nations, tribes, and communities whose ancestors have lived in North, Central and South America from earliest times. It is interdisciplinary in its scholarly approach to the world of American Indian peoples, offering a comprehensive and comparative perspective, including attention to the increasing dislocation and diaspora of indigenous people throughout the Americas.
     At the Master's level, we offer a course of study designed to prepare students for work in tribal administration and education, museums and cultural centers, community development, and public policy. The Master's program also prepares students to teach in tribal or other community colleges. NAS Master's students have pursued law school as well as further study in Native American Studies or related fields.
     At the Ph.D. level, we offer a course of study designed to train, strengthen and enlarge the critical mass of scholars working within the field of Native American Studies. Our graduates will be positioned to contribute to Native critical and creative intelligence in all its complexity. They will take their place as scholars within Native American Studies programs and relevant disciplines within social sciences and humanities.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native American/Indigenous ethnohistory/history; literature; art, art history, museum studies; language and linguistics; politics and development; religion and philosophy; racism and colonialism; ethnomusicology; indigenous writing systems (e.g., Maya); migration and transnationalism; refugees and human rights; Native women; environmental studies; performance and dance studies; Eastern North America, Southwest/North Mexico, Great Basin, California, Mexico, Central America, South America.

resources available: Within NAS: IRCA (Indigenous Research Center of the Americas); Native American Language Center; C. N. Gorman Museum; NASU (Native American Student Union), AISES (American Indian Science and Engineering Society), NEUE (Natives Empowered through Unity in Education), Native American Law Student Association. There is one Native staff person in the EOP/SAA office on campus who works with Native students, and one Native staff recruiter who engages in Outreach programs mostly within California. The Department of Native American Studies has a Student Affairs Officer who works with undergraduates. The UC Davis campus also has a counselor who specifically works with Native American students. NAS offers Summer Abroad courses (with field trips) in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico; Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico; and Quito, Ecuador.

financial aid available to students: At the undergraduate level: Rising Tribal award, work-study programs, and student loans; at the graduate level: work study programs, graduate research positions, Teaching Assistantships, Associate Instructor positions; numerous university-wide fellowships.

number of students in program: About 31 undergraduate majors, 35 minors; 4 graduate students in the Designated Emphasis program, 25 graduate students in the NAS Graduate Program.

distance learning: none as yet.


University of California, Irvine

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: History

name\title of head\director: Tanis C. Thorne, History Department.

degrees granted: B.A. minor granted with any academic major.

description of program offerings: Interdisciplinary Native American minor with core courses in social ecology, sociology, and history, and electives in humanities, social ecology, and social sciences.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Policy, law, history, California Indians, literature, dance, comparative cultures, networks analysis, art history.

resources available: UCI American Indian Resource Program; an alumni organization and Indian students' club, in the Cross-Cultural Center; excellent research institution library and on-line courses; central location to major Indian populations/communities in state; on-going programs (powwows, community outreach); access to on-line courses in regional network pending.

financial aid available to students: Yes

number of students in program: 5

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of California, Los Angeles

title of program: Interdepartmental Program in American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Paul Kroskrity, Chair; contact person: Clementine Bordeaux, Academic Coordinator.

degrees granted: B.A. (Capstone Major and Minor)* in American Indian Studies; M.A. in American Indian Studies; J.D./M.A. (Joint Degree) in Law and American Indian Studies [*Honors B.A.]

description of program offerings: Four areas of concentration: (1) History and Law, (2) Economic Development and Native Nation Building, (3) Social Relations, and (4) Language, Literature and Expressive Arts.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian Studies faculty include Randall Akee (Public Policy), Tara Browner (Ethnomusicology), Keith Camacho (Asian American Studies). Jessica Cattelino (Anthropology), Duane Champagne (Sociology), Michelle Erai (Gender Studies), Linda Garro (Anthropology), Hanay Geiogamah (Theater Arts), Mishuana Goeman (Gender Studies), Carole E. Goldberg (Law), Felicia Hodge (Nursing/Law), James Kawahara (Law), Cecilia F. Klein (Art History), Paul V. Kroskrity (Anthropology), Ben Madley (History), Vicky Mays (Psychology), Teresa McCarty (Education), Pamela Munro (Linguistics), Peter Nabokov (World Arts & Cultures), Stella Nair (Art History), Ellen Pearlstein (Information Studies), Nancy Reifel (Dentistry), Angela Riley (Law), Greg Schachner, (Anthropology), David Delgado Shorter (World Arts and Cultures), Kevin Terraciano (History), and Concepcion Valadez (Education).

resources available: American Indian Studies Center (an organized research unit separate from the Interdepartmental program) composed of Research Unit, Specialized Library, Publications Unit, and Student/ Community Relations Unit.

financial aid available to students: Limited number of graduate fellowships which cover registration fees (plus out-of-state tuition for non-residents of California) and a small stipend. The Arianna and Hannah Yellowthunder Scholarship is open to both undergraduate and graduate students of American Indian/Native American descent. Graduate Opportunity Fellowship for 1st year graduate students.

number of students in program: 9 graduate students, 13 undergraduate students.

distance learning: none


University of California, Riverside

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Ethnic Studies Department (B.A.), Department of History (Ph.D.)

name\title of head\director: Alfredo M. Mirandé, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. in Native American Studies; minor in NAS; B.A. in Ethnic Studies with emphasis in NAS; M.A. in American Indian History through the Dept of History; Ph.D. with Research and Complimentary (first or second) Fields in American Indian History and in Public History.

description of program offerings: Northwest, Southwest, and California Indian History; History of disease among Native Americans; Native American Oral and Contemporary Literatures; Ojibway History, Resistance Movements, and Survival Strategies.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: (See above.) Faculty include Cliff Trafzer, Rebecca Kugel (History); Robert Perez, Victoria Bomberry (Ethnic Studies).

resources available: The Ph.D. in American Indian History and Public History is a link between the university and Native communities, conducting research important to tribes and urban Indians. In addition, there are Native American Student Programs and Student Outreach Services/High School Recruitment. These programs both recruit and aid Native American students.

financial aid available to students: Through the History Department, we offer competitive fellowships to study American Indian History and Public History.

number of students in program: 15 Ph.D. students.

distance learning: [information not provided]


California State University, Chico

title of program: Center for Multicultural and Gender Studies

name\title of head\director: Tracy Butts, Director; Lisa Emmerich, Coordinator

degrees granted: Minor in American Indian Studies; Major with emphasis on American Indian Studies.

description of program offerings: American Indian Studies is intended to provide a flexible and broad selection of courses which will expose students both to the traditional body of knowledge about the American Indian and to subject matter useful in shedding light on the problems facing the American Indian today.
        Courses include Introduction to American Indian Studies, American Indian Literature, Worldviews of the American Indians, North American Indians, American Indian Law, American Indian History, Issues in American Indian Education, as well as more general courses on cross-cultural environmental ethics and intercultural communication.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian Studies faculty come from the departments of History, Psychology, English, Anthropology, Health and Community Service, Political Science, and Religious Studies.

resources available: Four Winds of Indian Education, American Indian Club, Indigenous Nations Alliance.

financial aid available to students: Federal scholarships (nothing local).

number of students in program: 5 registered minors, 3 majors with concentration in AIST.

distance learning: [information not provided]


California State University, East Bay

title of program: American Indian Studies Option

department in which housed: Department of Ethnic Studies

name\title of head\director: Enrique Salmon, Ethnic Studies Department

degrees granted: B.A. major or minor option.

description of program offerings: Minor or option in Native American Studies for any major campus wide--28 quarter units required.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: North and Central America; agroecology, ethnoecology, ethnobotany; linguistic and medical

anthropology; U.S. policy; environmental justice; identity issues.

resources available: Minimal.

financial aid available to students: EOP excellent.

number of students in program: 32 minors.

distance learning: [information not provided]


California State University, Long Beach

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Craig Stone, Director

degrees granted: minor and certificate in American Indian Studies.

description of program offerings: The program offers 20 courses including art (3), history(3), culture(3), Federal Indian Law(1), education(1), media(1), cinema(1), contemporary issues(1), intro to AIS (1), philosophies(1), literature(2), internship(2). CSULB Ranks 10th Nationally in Awarding Bachelor's Degrees to Minority Students According to Diverse Issues in Higher Education. Among individual ethnicities, CSULB ranked seventh nationally in conferring bachelor's degrees to Native Americans, first nationally in foreign languages degrees awarded to Native Americans, first in English degrees to Native Americans, first in math and statistics to Native Americans, and first in parks and recreation degrees to Native Americans.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian history, law, art, drumming, American Indian philosophies, family, literature, American Indian women's literature, education, media and cinema.

resources available: The University is near the largest urban Indian population and affiliated with Southern California Indian Center. There is an advisor specifically for American Indian students.

financial aid available to students: There is a small loans program; Graduate Equity fellowships (up to $5000) and $25,000 beginning undergraduates scholarships (which pay all expenses: tuition, fees, housing, meals, books, etc. for four years) for high school valedictorians and national merit finalists in California.

number of students in program: 240 American Indian students on campus; 40 of the 500 students who take AIS classes are American Indian.

distance learning: none offered.


California State University, Northridge

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Scott Andrews, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: Interdisciplinary. Four AIS courses (Intro to AIS, AI Law and Policy, AI Contemporary Social Issues, and AI in Popular Culture) and other courses offered through anthropology, history, English, religious studies, and art.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Dr. Karren Baird-Olson teaches the introductory course and AIS courses relative to sociology and law/policy. She has published on AIS topics of gender, criminology, and interethnic relations. Dr. Scott Andrews teaches AI literature in the English Department and the AIS popular culture course. He has published poetry, fiction, and essays on contemporary AI literature.

resources available: American Indian Student Association has its own meeting space on campus; it sponsors an annual powwow and activities for Indigenous Awareness Month in November (including Columbus Day protest), as well as other events and field trips. The student association is supplemented by the First Nation Alumni Association (FNAA).

financial aid available to students: Referral source.

number of students in program: Between 5 and 10 students in the minor; the students active in AISA varies from 10-20.

distance learning: no


California State University, Sacramento

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Ethnic Studies

name\title of head\director: Annette L. Reed, Director

degrees granted: B.A. Minor in Native American Studies; B.A. in Ethnic Studies (major or minor) w/ concentration in Native American Studies.

description of program offerings: The Native American Studies program is designed to broaden educational opportunities for American Indian students and provide an educational experience for those interested within the total student body. In addition, the program provides students with a rich interdisciplinary approach to theoretical, historical, and contemporary perspectives regarding the study of native peoples. As a third goal, the program seeks to enhance cultural awareness and identity in the classroom, the campus and campus community.
        To promote these goals, Native American Studies cooperates with other university agencies in recruiting, counseling, tutoring, and coordinating financial aid for American Indian students. In 2002, in conjunction with Rumsey Band of Wintun Indians, Native American Studies established the Rumsey California Native American Scholarship. Curriculum development and enhancement remains central to our program. Also, beginning in 2003 we serve as co-sponsors for the highly successful Summer Rez Program for Native American High School Students. We continue to work actively in various capacities within the larger Native American communities.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indians, Sovereignty and U.S. Laws; Native American Tribal Governments; California Native Experience; Indians, Film, and Popular Culture; Native American Women; Native Voice, Memory, and Biography.

resources available: [Information not provided.]

financial aid available to students: [Information not provided.]

number of students in program: [Information not provided.]

distance learning: [information not provided]


California State University, San Marcos

title of program: Native Studies

name\title of head\director: Joely Proudfit, Ph.D., coordinator the California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center and Director of Native American Strategic Planning

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: The native studies minor demands a range of knowledge focused in four areas: indigenous cultures, history, and the social and environmental contexts of native life. It makes use of the strengths of university faculty members in history, anthropology, linguistics, communication, music, visual arts, biology, and economics. The minor prepares students who expect to work with native communities to understand those communities in a broad cultural, historical, social, and environmental context. Students who earn the minor should have the particular knowledge and sensitivity necessary to work successfully as educators, administrators of businesses and tribal and other governmental bodies, and members of other professions serving native communities. (Eighteen reservations are located all or in part in San Diego County, and the California and urban American Indian population is upwards of thirty thousand, not including members of indigenous communities based in Mexico.)

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Principal native studies faculty members have expertise in Tribal Government, American Indian Political and Economic Development, American Indian history, American Indian media, American Indian education, ethnobotany and traditional medicine, and the teaching of native languages.

resources available: Through its tribal communities liaison and the university president's Native Advisory Council, the university has formed close relationships with a number of local Indian communities. The university has signed a memorandum of agreement with one reservation to encourage its students to attend Cal State San Marcos and is seeking others. The California Indian Cultural and Sovereignty Center fosters collaborative research and community service relationships between the faculty, staff, and students of CSU San Marcos and members of local Tribal communities, for the purpose of developing and conducting research projects which support the maintenance of sovereignty and culture within those communities.

financial aid available to students: In addition to other programs the university offers the annual Lee Dixon memorial scholarship for a tribally-enrolled American Indian student based on academic achievement, service to the Indian community, and financial need, with preference to incoming freshmen.

number of students in program: c. 12

distance learning: [information not provided]


Cape Breton University

title of program: Mi'kmaq Studies

department in which housed: School of Arts and Community Studies, Department of Heritage and Culture

name\title of head\director: Ian Brodie, Department Chair; Lindsay Marshall, Director, Mi'kmaq College Institute. The Mi'kmaq College Institute, which was instituted July 2000, oversees all academic matters associated with Mi'kmaq initiatives, issues and University Courses. It is the umbrella for the following Programs and Services at University College of Cape Breton:
        Aboriginal Programming, Director Ms. Ann C. Denny
        Mi'kmaq Student Services, Director Patrick Johnson.
        Mi'kmaq Resource Centre, Director Patrick Johnson

degrees granted: B.A. (major and minor) in Mi'kmaq Studies; B.A.C.S. Bachelor of Arts in Community Studies (concentration in Mi'kmaq Studies); B.Sc. Mi'kmaq Component; B.B.A. Mi'kmaq Component; Mi'kmaq Science Advantage Program; Mi'kmaq Business Development Program; Natural Resources Certificate; Court Workers Certificate; Certificate in Public Administration, Concentration in First Nations Affairs.

description of program offerings: Mi'kmaq Studies, Linguistics, Native Art and Music, Mi'kmaq English, Mi'kmaq Ethnobotany, Conversational Mi'kmaq, Mi'kmaq History, Introduction to Mi'kmaq Literacy, Mi'kmaq Government, Lexicology, Peoples of Native North America, Cross Cultural Perspective, Aboriginal and Treaty Rights in Canadian Constitution, Race and Ethnic Relations, Race Relations in North America, Contemporary Mi'kmaq Issues.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Student Services, Mi'kmaq courses.

resources available: Mi'kmaq Cultural Centre, Mi'kmaq Student Services, Mi'kmaq Student Centre, Mi'kmaq Student Advisor, Mi'kmaq Student Association, Mi'kmaq Access Program, Mi'kmaq Resource Centre, tutoring is available to all Mi'kmaq students.

financial aid available to students: Mi'kmaq students are usually funded by their home reserves through their education programs; Mi'kmaq students are eligible to apply for Student Loans. Mi'kmaq students are eligible to apply for University entrance scholarships and bursaries to help offset the cost of getting an education..

number of students in program: 200 full-time, 20 part-time students.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Colgate University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Jordan Kerber, Director (Jkerber@colgate.edu)

degrees granted: Major concentration and minor in Native American Studies.

description of program offerings: Colgate's major in Native American studies offers students the opportunity to undertake a comparative and historical study of the pre-Columbian, colonial, and contemporary cultures of North and Latin America. The required and elective courses are drawn from a wide range of disciplines, representing the various topical and areal interests of Colgate faculty members whose specializations concern the archaeology, art, culture, geography, history, literature, music, religion, and Euro-American contact of native populations in the New World. Themes and topics of the major include the integrity, richness, and complexity of indigenous cultures of the Western hemisphere; the reciprocal impact of traditions and interests that occurred with colonization; modes and processes of cultural change; cultural disintegration, survival, and revitalization; and an understanding of the variety of methodological and theoretical approaches to Native American studies.



areas of faculty interest\expertise: Art, archaeology, culture, history, religion, education, literature, music, and Euro-American contact of Native populations in the New World.

resources available: A Study Group to Santa Fe, New Mexico whose purpose is to expose a select group of students to Native American history, archaeology, life, and culture through study and personal contact with American Indians and Indian cultural resources in the "Pueblo Plateau" country of the upper Rio Grande.

financial aid available to students: Available particularly for Native American Students.

number of students in program: 6-12 majors.

distance learning: no


University of Colorado, Boulder

title of program: American Indian Studies

department in which housed: Ethnic Studies

name\title of head\director: Daryl Maeda, Chair

degrees granted: B.A., minor in Ethnic Studies.

description of program offerings: Interdisciplinary research in American Indian Studies; research and critical examination of culture, history, and contemporary issues.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native American literature, film, history and culture, Native American women.

resources available: Bueno Center for Multicultural Education, Career Services, Center for Multicultural Affairs, Miramontes Arts and Sciences Program, Oyate student association.

financial aid available to students: Information at http://www.colorado.edu/StudentAffairs/finaid/index.html.

number of students in program: 115 majors and 60 minors.

distance learning: no


Concordia University

title of program: First Peoples Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Karl S. Hele, Director

degree(s) granted: B.A. Major and Minor

description of program offerings: The First Peoples Studies program is a Major designed to introduce the student to the world of First Peoples (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis), specifically within the Quebec context. It investigates the history, the current situation, and the changing needs of First Peoples. Taught from First Peoples perspectives and based on sound, culturally sensitive research, the program's aim is to bring accurate awareness and a better understanding of First Peoples issues, develop further understanding of society's standing in relation to First Peoples, and build mutual understanding between Quebec society and First Peoples.
     We offer, aside from the Introduction to First People Studies, core courses on Algonquian, Inuit, and Haudenosaunee peoples (including languages), Art, Eduction, The Indian Act, Politics, Sacred Stories, Contemporary Issues, Treaties, Governance, Rights, and International Issues.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Dr. Karl Hele: First Nations in Canada, Early contacts between First Peoples and Newcomers, Anishinaabe, Métis, Borderlands, Great Lakes, Colonial Canada. Dr. Louelly White: Indigenous identity formation and cultural resurgence; boarding/residential school experiences and historical roots of contemporary ideologies toward culture and language; Indigenous language and cultural immersion influences on academic performance; community participatory research.

resources available: [Information not provided]

financial aid available to students: no

number of students in program: 40 majors and minors

distance learning: no


University of Connecticut

title of program: Native American & Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Margaret M. Bruchac and Dr. Kevin McBride, Coordinators

degree(s) granted: B.A. minor

description of program offerings: See http://averypoint.uconn.edu/native_american_studies/minor.html

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Dr. Margaret Bruchac, Assistant Professor of Anthropology (margaret.bruchac@uconn.edu , http://www.averypoint.uconn.e du/faculty/bruchac.html); Dr. Joseph Comprone, Professor of English (joseph.comprone@uconn.edu); Dr. Kevin McBride, Associate Professor of Anthropology (kevin.mcbride@uconn.edu, http://www.anth.uconn.edu/faculty/mcbride/); Dr. Nancy Shoemaker, Professor of History (nancy.shoemaker@uconn.edu, http://www.history.uconn.edu/people/shoemaker.php).

resources available: Native American Cultural Society at Storrs campus; Native American Speaker Series.

financial aid available to students: Not at present, but students can apply for internships at the nearby Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center, the Tantaquidgeon Mohegan Indian Museum, and other appropriate venues.

number of students in program: 5-10 at any given time.

distance learning: Not at present.


Cornell University

title of program: American Indian Program

name\title of head\director: Jolene Rickard, Ph. D., Director

degrees granted: B.A. Minor in American Indian Studies; Graduate Minor in American Indian Studies.

description of program offerings: The American Indian Program (AIP) at Cornell is a multi-disciplinary, inter-college program that coordinates campus-wide activities in academics, student support, extension, university residence life, and publications. The AIP affirms the many and varied experiences of indigenous youth and supports and enables their achievement at Cornell. It advances scholarship and research in a variety of disciplinary fields, extending Cornell resources to Indian communities on health, environmental, policy and related issues. It provides public forms addressing some of the leading issues and topics in indigenous studies to further the discussions and efforts for indigenous self determination.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: The AIP faculty are located in the departments of Anthropology, Art, Development Sociology, English, History, History of Art and Visual Studies, Horticulture, Law, Linguistics, Natural Resources and Performance Studies.

resources available: Fellowship opportunities through AIP's membership in the Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies; AIP student enrichment grants for travel, research, internships and experiential learning opportunities; Native American Communities Outreach; Akwe:kon Residence Hall; NASAC (Native American Students at Cornell), (AISES) American Indian Science and Engineering Society), IGSA (Indigenous Graduate Student Association), NALSA (Native American Law Student Association).

financial aid available to students: Contact American Indian Program for more information: Kathy Halbig (Student Development Specialist) at klh37@cornell.edu.

number of students in program: 170

distance learning: no


Creighton University

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Department of Sociology and Anthropology (Joint Major involving 10 departments).

name\title of head\director: Raymond Bucko, S.J., Director

degree(s) granted: B.A. major and minor.

description of program offerings: Standard academic program and community building/linking component.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Ethnohistory of Native American Cultures, History, Contemporary Issues, Research, Native American policy/law, Gender issues, Religion, Psychology, Political issues.

resources available: Native American Center, Native American Student Organization (NAA), Multicultural Affairs Office, Minority Health Sciences, Office of Student Success, Writing Center, Native Dentistry program.

financial aid available to students: Three dedicated Native American scholarships.

number of students in program: 8

distance learning: no


Dartmouth College

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: N. Bruce Duthu, Chair; Sheila Laplante, program manager.

degrees granted: B.A. (major and minor).

description of program offerings: Currently, core courses include Perspectives in Native American Studies; Indian Country Today; North American Native History; Peoples and Cultures of Native North America; Native Americans and the Law; Native American Literature; Native American biographies; Oral literature; Indigenous Nationalism, Native Rights & Sovereignty; Indian Killers: Murder & Mystery in Native American Literature & Film; Native American Law & Literature; American Indian Intellectuals; Alaska: American Dreams & Native Realities; Senior Seminars, Independent Study and Honors. Various seminar and topical courses are offered from year to year. Dartmouth students from all ethnic backgrounds may achieve a major or minor in Native American Studies. As an interdisciplinary modified major, Native American Studies often serves as a supplement to the traditional major fields of study currently offered at the College.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Tribal history, history of federal Indian policy, Native American autobiography, ethnohistory and ethnohistorical methodology, modern and traditional Native American literatures, tribal government, tribal sovereignty, federal Indian law, culture and history of Native Alaskans and Natives of Northwest Coast, archaeology, ancient civilizations in Basin of Mexico.

resources available: Dartmouth's Baker Library supports an extensive collection of Native American material. Native American Studies also maintains and supports its own library. Students majoring (or minoring) in NAS may apply for funding from the program to support internships or off-campus independent research projects. Students receive additional support from the Native American Program (NAP) and other mentoring activities. Dartmouth college also offers the Eastman Fellowship to support a Native American graduate student in completing the Ph.D. dissertation.

financial aid available to students: See Financial Aid office.

number of students in program: Approximately 20 majors.

distance learning: no


East Central University

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: History and NAS

name/title of head/director: Dr. Tom Cowger, Director of Native American Studies, Chickasaw Endowed Chair.

degree(s) granted: B.A. Native American Studies; Minor Native American Studies

description of program offerings: A flexible interdisciplinary degree program that prepares non-Native and Native students with the skills and knowledge to work for or with Native communities or individuals. It also features several unique partnerships with American Indian Nations within the university's service area.

areas of faculty interest/expertise: History and policy, American Indian law, Native American philosophy, contemporary Native American issues and activism, Indian Child Welfare Act, and Choctaw and Chickasaw languages.

resources available (Native American services, offices, clubs/organizations, libraries, publications, etc.): Hayes Native American Studies Center, Native American Student Support Services, Native American Student Association and significant Native American library collection holdings.

financial aid available: Federal, state and university financial aid opportunities as well as tribal assistance for some members meeting tribal membership eligibility and requirements.

number of students in program: 30

distance learning: no


Eastern Washington University

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Deirdre A. Almeida, Ed.D., Director

degrees granted: Minor

description of program offerings: Eastern's Indian Studies Program offers a curriculum designed to: prepare students for professional employment within their Indian nations; offer an appropriate support apparatus for Indian students who wish to enter any of the major disciplines; and develop important course work to meet the intellectual aspirations of all Americans and the wider society.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Contemporary Indian issues; federal Indian policy; Native American literatures; tribal economic development; Indians of the Northwest; Salish Indian languages; Native American/Indigenous education; Native American women; Native American cinema

resources available: The Indian Studies Program provides an advising system to Native American students as a means of enriching and supporting their individual academic goals and cultural heritage. IDST advisers assist students with academic planning, career counseling, tutorial services, financial aid information/workshops, orientation, assistance with admissions, liaison with BIA and tribal organizations. Program headquarters also serve as a resource/referral center where social services and personal counseling also are provided.

financial aid available to students: Is available. Number of scholarships specifically for Native American students. Must apply through Eastern Washington University Office of Financial Aid.

number of students in program: Approximately 200 students enrolled at EWU have self identified as American Indian.

distance learning: No


The Evergreen State College

title of program: Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute

name\title of head\director: Alan Parker, Director

degrees granted: B.A., B.S., Master of Environmental Studies, Master in Teaching. Evergreen does not have departments or majors.

description of program offerings: On-campus, yearlong coordinated study programs begin with a focus on the basic principles and concepts of the unique treaty relationship between Tribal Nations and the U.S. government. Students explore a continuum from pre-Columbian times to the global effects of colonialism and the political and cultural revitalization movements of the contemporary era, with particular attention given to the tribes of the Pacific Northwest. These programs are grounded in a recognition of the vitality and diversity of contemporary indigenous communities. A newly established program of advanced studies in tribal government management and administration has also been established within the Master in Public Administration program. A new class of students will begin the two-year program in 2004 and again in 2006. Students take required courses in Public Administration and 24 graduate credits in tribal government organization, policy development and intergovernmental
        Off campus, the reservation-based program emphasizes community-determined education within the tribal communities where the classes are held. Students are encouraged to value local knowledge and its place in their academic work. Learning continues through student involvement in the activities of the Longhouse Education and Cultural Center and the Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Faculty who team teach in the Native American Studies programs bring expertise in creative writing, the arts, Native American history, tribal policy, natural resource management, and tribal leadership to name just a few areas.

resources available: First Peoples recruitment and First Peoples advising services are offices which assist students with admissions, financial aid, and academic support services. Evergreen also has a strong Native Student Alliance which provides educational and cultural programming for the entire campus. The focal point of the campus is the Longhouse Education and Cultural Center, which represents a living, contemporary cultural link to the indigenous nations of the Pacific Northwest. The facility is operated as an Evergreen Public Service Institute and serves a gathering place for classes, conferences, cultural ceremonies, performances, exhibits, and community gatherings.

financial aid available to students: Federal and state financial aid are available along with various scholarships.

number of students in program: Varies; 175 class spaces available for our various full-time course offerings for the 1997-98 academic year.

distance learning: [information not provided]


First Nations University of Canada

title of program: Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Lesley McBain

degrees granted: B.A.; B.A. w/ Honours

description of program offerings: The Indigenous Studies program offers a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Arts Honours, which provides the Social Science core for most degree and certificate programs offered by the First Nations University of Canada, fostering research and the intellectual study of Indigenous and Aboriginal peoples and their cultures -- with emphasis on Saskatchewan first, followed by Canada, North America, the western hemisphere and the world. Efforts are explicitly meant to complement, not replace, the knowledge and traditional teachings of Elders. A Minor in Indigenous Studies is also available. While taking courses face-to-face or by video conferencing at either of the three campuses, and/or on-line via UR Courses, Indigenous Studies students are prepared to compete for all career options open to other university Arts graduates, to participate in second degree programs in faculties such as Law, Administration, Education, Fine Arts, Science and Social Work, or to pursue honours and graduate studies in the Social Sciences or Humanities.

Areas of faculty interest\expertise: Cree, Assiniboine, Saulteaux, Dene, Dakota, Inuit, and Métis cultures and histories; Indian economic, environmental, and geographic systems; principles of First Nations governance; North American First Peoples sacred ways/religious views, philosophies; research theory and methodology.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Cree, Assiniboine, Saulteaux, Dene, Dakota, Inuit, and Métis cultures and histories; Indian economic, environmental, and geographic systems; principles of First Nations governance; North American First Peoples sacred ways/religious views, philosophies; research theory and methodology.

resources available: The Indian Studies program is one of several majors offered at First Nations University of Canada, a University College whose mission is to enhance the quality of life, and to preserve, protect and interpret the history, language, culture and artistic heritage of First Nations; accordingly, all of FNUniv's resources are at the disposal of all FNUniv students.

financial aid available to students: Contact FNUniv Student Services.

number of students in program: c. 1000 First Nations, Aboringal and Metis students at FNUniv's three campuses.

distance learning: Courses can be taken face-to-face or by video conferencing at any of the three campuses, and/or on-line via University of Regina courses.


Five Colleges, Inc.

title of program: Native American Indian Studies Certificate Program

name\title of head\director: Kathleen A. Brown-Pérez (UMass Amherst) and Lisa Brooks (Amherst College), co-chairs

degrees granted: Curriculum open to undergraduate degree students (B.A., B.S.) at the Five Colleges (Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Hampshire, and Amherst College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst).. University of Massachusetts Amherst also has a Native American Indian Studies certificate program (for B.A., B.S.).

description of program offerings: Courses offered on each campus (University of Massachusetts, Amherst College, Hampshire College, Smith College, and Mount Holyoke College) in various fields allow students to explore issues affecting the history and current circumstances of indigenous peoples and to study indigenous methodologies.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Legal studies, law, history, anthropology, literature, linguistics, public health, education, English, comparative literature, and American Studies.

resources available: Student associations on some campuses, including the Josephine White Eagle Cultural Center at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

financial aid available to students: available

number of students in program: 20

distance learning: no


University of Florida

title of program: American Indian and Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Robin M. Wright, Professor of Religion, Anthropology, and Latin American Studies

degree(s) granted: Minor, Concentration

description of program offerings: Minor: This minor, housed in the Departments of Anthropology and Religion, lets students focus on North or South America with additional interdisciplinary focus in anthropology, art history, history, literature and religion. Concentration: The AIIS (American Indian and Indigenous Studies) concentration is an extension of the minor for students who have interest in American Indian or Indigenous Studies topics and would like to take their studies further with writing a senior thesis. This concentration is open to all students. The AIIS concentration will offer courses which cut across all disciplines such as anthropology, religion, Latin American studies, and history. This concentration deals with the issues and concerns of indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere while seeking to understand historical, political, social, and religious structures from an indigenous perspective.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology, History, Religion, the Americas.

resources available: Native Americans Oral History Collections: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/oh4; Pearsall Collection of American Indian Art: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/pearsall/about_coll.htm; Native American Heritage Month: http://www.dso.ufl.edu/news/news.php?id=206

financial aid available to students: n/a

number of students in program: [information not provided]

distance learning: no


Fort Lewis College

title of program: Department of Native American and Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Majel Boxer, Ph.D., Chair

degree(s) granted: B.A. in NAIS (major and minor)

description of program offerings: Please see website

areas of faculty interest\expertise: [information not provided]

resources available: In addition to our outstanding academic program, we have a very active Native American Center that serves the student services needs of students -- many tutoring and other support systems exist in that Center and in other programs of the college. We have over 700 Native students in many majors across campus (the total student population is about 3,800).

financial aid available to students: Financial aid is available to students through a full tuition waiver as a result of the college's history as a former Indian boarding school. See the following website for that information: http://www.fortlewis.edu/ financialaid/NativeAmericans.aspx.

number of students in program: 31 majors, 31 minors.

distance learning: no


George Mason University

title of program: Interdisciplinary Minor in Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS)

name\title of head\director: Eric Gary Anderson

degree(s) granted: B.A. minor

description of program offerings: see website, which includes catalog copy.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native American studies, Native American literature, folklore, archaeology, anthropology, Latin American history, Mesoamerica, museum studies.

resources available: GMU Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Multicultural Education: http://o dime.gmu.edu/programming/american-indianalaskan-nativeindigenous/; Native American & Indigenous Alliance: https://www.facebook.com/groups/naia. gmu/ and http://vimeo.com/48439061; Smithsonian museums, including National Museum of the American Indian.

financial aid available to students: none

number of students in program: 6-8

distance learning: none yet.


University of Georgia

title of program: Institute of Native American Studies / Native American Studies Programs

name\title of head\director: Jace Weaver, Director

degree(s) granted: Undergraduate and graduate certificates for any degree (B.A., M.A., J.D., Ph.D., etc.) in any "traditional" discipline

description of program offerings: See website (Curriculum page).

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology, archaeology, gender, history, law and policy, literature, religion, ethnobotany, landscape architecture, and public health.

resources available: See website (Resources page).

financial aid available to students: Students are eligible for all financial aid available to students at the University of Georgia. In addition, the Institute of Native American Studies offers certain additional aid opportunities. Qualified students who are enrolled citizens of federally recognized tribal nations with historic Georgia connections, can receive in-state tuition regardless of state of residency. Graduate students may receive $500 per year in travel/research funds. A pilot program in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control allows one graduate student who is an enrolled citizen of a federally recognized tribe who is a degree student in UGA's College of Public Health and who is also earning INAS' graduate certificate free tuition and an internship in tribal health at the CDC.

number of students in program: Approximately 25 undergraduates and 9 graduate students.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Hampshire College

[See listing for Five Colleges, Inc.]



Haskell Indian Nations University

title of program: College of Indigenous and American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Daniel Wildcat, Ph.D.

degree(s) granted: B.A.

description of program offerings: General Education Curriculum that

integrates the experiences of Indigenous and American Indian Studies as well as Junior/Senior baccalaureate level coursework to support the degree.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: [Information not provided.]

resources available: Native American services, AIS Student Club, Native American Collection - Haskell Library

financial aid available to students: Yes.

number of students in program: 70

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Hawai'i at Hilo

title of program: Ka Haka 'Ula O Ke'elikolani (College of Hawaiian Language)

name\title of head\director: Dr. Kalena Silva, Director of the College; Dr. William H. Wilson, Chair of the Academic Programs Division; Ms. Keiki Kawai'ae'a , Director of the Hale Kuamo'o

degree(s) granted: B.A. (Major and minor) in Hawaiian Studies; M.A. in Hawaiian Language and Literature; M.A. in Indigenous Language and Culture Education; Ph.D. in Hawaiian and Indigenous Language and Culture Revitalization; Certificate in Basic Hawaiian Culture; Certificate in Hawaiian Language.

description of program offerings: The College was mandated by the state legislature to provide tertiary education through the medium of Hawaiian, to provide Hawaiian medium teacher training, and to provide indigenous language outreach.
        The College offers some 40 undergraduate courses in Hawaiian and indigenous language and culture, most of which is offered through Hawaiian. The College offers some 25 graduate courses many of which are through Hawaiian. Specially tailored programing for other indigenous languages and cultures is provided for selected graduate students. The College also has a laboratory school program taught through Hawaiian from preschool through grade 12. (Other indigenous related courses are available in indigenous areas on campus, primarily relating to the American and other Pacific Islands.)

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Faculty expertise includes indigenous language and culture revitalization, indigenous education, immersion programing, technology and indigenous languages, language planning, ethnomusicology, ethnography, Hawaiian and other Polynesian languages. (Other faculty on campus have expertise in additional areas relating to Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders, and North American Natives.)

resources available: The campus has student services targeting Native Hawaiians, and also a program for American Indians. The college has an extensive Native Hawaiian collection and language revitalization collection. Also located on campus is, 'Imiloa, a 40,000 square foot fully bilingual museum integrating Hawaiian culture revitalization with science. Nawahiokalani'opu'u Hawaiian medium laboratory school and its traditional Hawaiian gardens and animal husbandry is a major resource of the College. The Hale Kuamo'o Hawaiian language center provides research and students employment using Hawaiian. The Leoki Hawaiian language computer services is located on campus. The College's consortium partner, the 'Aha Punana Leo, has off campus offices working with the College. There is a Hawaiian club on campus and extensive Hawaiian cultural activities available off campus. The College has relationships, including exchange relationships, with other institutions serving indigenous people in North America and the Pacific.

financial aid available to students: The college has scholarships available for undergraduate Native Hawaiian students. Out-of-state Native Hawaiian students pay in-state tuition.

number of students in program: In 2005, the College had 116 undergraduate majors and 21 graduate majors. Enrollment in courses of the College is approximately 700 per semester.

distance learning: We do have distance learning capabilities and, in the past two years, have concentrated them in two of our programs: Teacher training (because the program has students teachers from four neighboring islands) and the Ph.D. (because several of the courses were taught by affiliated faculty at other institutions on the U.S. continent).


University of Hawai'i at Mänoa

title of program: Kamakaküokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies

name\title of head\director: Maile Andrade, MFA, Director

degree(s) granted: B.A., M.A.

description of program offerings: B.A. and M.A. have five concentrations: Kükulu Aupuni: Envisioning the Nation; Hälau O Laka: Academy of Visual and Performing Arts; Mo'olelo 'Öiwi: Hawaiian History and Literature; Mälama 'Äina: Living in Harmony with the Land, Resource Management; Kumu Kahiki: Comparative Polynesian and Indigenous Studies.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Hawaiian History, Politics, Literature, Genealogy, Music, Visual Arts and Hula; Traditional Resource Management; Taro Cultivation and Fish Pond Management; Ali'i Trusts; Celestial Navigation. The faculty are also practicing poets, musicians, artists, composers of Hawaiian chants and poetry.

resources available: http://manoa.hawaii.edu/hshk/resources/

financial aid available to students: http://manoa.hawaii.edu/nhss/financial-aid-scholarships/

number of students in program: 135 majors.

distance learning: not available


Humboldt State University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Christina Accomando, Chair [ca3@humboldt.edu]

degrees granted: B.A. major and minor.

description of program offerings: Humboldt State University offers a B.A. with a Native American Studies major and a minor in Native American Studies. This is the only such B.A. in Native American Studies in the California State University system.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Joseph Giovannetti (Enrolled Tolowa - Smith River Rancheria, Assoc. Professor): Native American psychology and mental health, California Indian history and culture, tribal governance, federal recognition, Indian education; Marlon Sherman (Oglala Lakota, Assoc. Professor): indigenous and tribal: law, justice, peacemaking, governance, leadership, environment, water law, resource use, culture, literature, poetry, history and philosophy; Dale Ann Sherman (Enrolled Yurok/Tolowa, Lecturer): Native American literature and oral tradition, American Indian Museum Studies, and NAGPRA; Rain Archambeau Marshall (Yankton Sioux/Choctaw, Lecturer): Federal Indian law, environmental law, water law, Native American perspectives in natural resources, introduction to Native American Studies, tribal governance, and tribal justice systems.

resources available: The Humboldt State University service area has the largest indigenous Indian population of any part of California (estimated 14,000 persons in Humboldt and Del Norte counties). Seven rancherias and reservations are in the immediate service area of the university. Support programs include Indians in Natural Resources, Science and Engineering (INRSEP), the Indian Tribal and Education Personnel Program (ITEPP), several student clubs, Many Tribal Nations, ITEPP Club, Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SCANAS), American Indians Science & Engineering Society (AISES). Many American Indian students who are first generation candidates for enrollment/transfer to Humboldt State are also eligible for services and financial aid from the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP). EOP offers stipends and services to underrepresented students who meet financial criteria.

financial aid available to students: Humboldt State offers the same federal and state financial aid programs as any other institution in the California State University system. Humboldt State University also offers twenty $1,000 annual President's Native American Scholarships, awarded each spring (based on merit). These must be competitively re-applied for each year. Interested students must indicate "American Indian" for their race at the time they apply to Humboldt State on the CSU application to Humboldt and must be able to present documentation of Tribal affiliation. Other scholarships -- including Maggie Griffin Scholarship (students of Yurok descent) and Ronda Marshall Memorial Scholarship -- listed at these links: http://www.humboldt.edu/itepp/family/Nativescholarships.htm and http://www.humboldt.edu/nativeprograms.

number of students in program: 25 majors, 11 declared minors (actual number is larger) .

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Idaho

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Jan Johnson, Acting Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor; Master of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Studies w/ focus on American Indian Studies.

description of program offerings: See http://www.uidaho.edu/class/interdisciplinary/aist.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: See http://www.uidaho.edu/class/interdisciplinary/aist.

resources available: Sponsor Annual American Indian Film Festival [http://www.webs.uidaho.edu/SapatqaynCinema/]; sponsor Annual Distinguished American Indians Speakers Series [http://www.uidaho.edu/class/interdisciplinary/aist].

financial aid available to students: Per application.

number of students in program: 12

distance learning: no


Idaho State University

title of program: American Indian Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Drusilla Gould, Director; Christopher Loether, Associate Director

degree(s) granted: Minor; MBA specializing in Native American Business Administration

description of program offerings: Current Issues in Indian Country; Seminar in American Indian Studies; American Indian Verbal Arts; Survey of American Indian Languages; American Indian Literature; Shoshoni Language; Advanced Shoshoni Grammar; Native American History; Native American Arts; Special Topics in Indian Education; Tribal Governments; Federal Indian Law; Native American Women; Indigenous Parenting; Native Arts and Industries.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Linguistics, Native language survival, American Indian literature and culture, Shoshoni language and culture, Native Alaskan fisheries, Alaskan archaeology and prehistory, Great Basin prehistory, Great Basin pottery, Mayan archaeology and prehistory, Mesoamerican calendrical studies.

resources available: Shoshoni Language Project; Shoshoni Club; Native Americans United; Native student counselor/ recruitment & retention officer; American Indian Support Committee (faculty committee); dual enrollment courses offered at ShoBan High School at neighboring Fort Hall reservation.

financial aid available to students: Some university-level scholarships dedicated to Native students; hopefully more to come.

number of students in program: Approximately 10-15 minors, many more taking Native studies classes through Anthropology, English, and other departments.

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Robert Warrior, Director

degree(s) granted: Undergraduate Minor in American Indian Studies; Graduate Minor in American Indian and Indigenous Studies; Undergraduate Major available through the Individual Plans of Study program.

description of program offerings: More than 30 American Indian Studies courses, including Contemporary Issues in Indian Country; Native Religious Traditions; Language and Culture; American Indian Literature; Indians and Film; Native American History (two courses: Natives to 1850, Natives since 1850); Federal Indian Policy; Indigenous Intellectuals; Theories and Methods in American Indian Studies; Indigenous Governance; Politics of Children's Literature; Politics of Popular Culture; American Indian Education; Indigenous Critical Theory; Indigenous Decolonial Methods; Indigenous Histories/Politics; and many topic seminars that change from year to year.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Faculty who teach in the American Indian Studies Program bring expertise in creative writing, literature, comparative Native cultural and historical studies, Native American history, federal Indian law and policy, film studies, Pacific historiography and cultural critique, and American Indian education to name just a few areas.

resources available: Two Chancellor's Postdoctoral fellowships in American Indian and Indigenous Studies are available annually; Teaching assistantships and waivers; UIUC's libraries support extensive collections of American Indian materials; membership in Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies; Native American House (cultural center).

financial aid available to students: Federal and state financial aid are available along with various scholarships and fellowships.

number of students in program: n/a.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Indiana University

title of program: Native American and Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Deborah Cohn, Chair of American Studies

degree(s) granted: B.A. Minor, Native American and Indigenous Studies, and Ph.D. Minor, Native American and Indigenous Studies

description of program offerings: PhD minor: We encourage graduate students to develop a program of academic inquiry that complements their doctoral program and takes advantage of the wide range of College of Arts and Sciences faculty with a focus on Native American and Indigenous literature, politics, art, history, culture, and folklore. Each student's "Program of Study" is developed upon their entry to the degree and in consultation with the American Studies Director. 12 total credit hours. See website for coursework specifics. Undergraduate minor: Through their coursework, students globally and comparatively formulate a conception of indigeneity, while understanding the persistence of localism in Indigenous culture and gain new perspectives on globalization, sustainability, history, and cultural and environmental preservation. 15 total credit hours. See website for coursework specifics.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Africa, the Americas, Australia, New Zealand, South Pacific. Colonialism and postcolonialism; citizenship; race; ethnicity; diaspora; violence; folklore; ethnomusicology; material culture; language revitalization; media; the body; ethnohistory.

resources available: The American Indian Studies Research Institute (AISRI), First Nations Educational and Cultural Center (FNECC), Mathers Museum of World Cultures, William R. Adams Zooarchaeology Laboratory, Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, Native American Resources at the Herman B Wells Library.

financial aid available to students: Through IU.

number of students in program: 5 undergrad, 9 grad

distance learning: no


University of Iowa

title of program: American Indian and Native Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Erica Prussing, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor; Undergraduate and Graduate Certificates in American Indian and Native Studies.

description of program offerings: The American Indian and Native Studies Program (AINSP) is an interdisciplinary program that focuses on the histories, cultures, languages, arts, crafts, beliefs, political and social organizations, economies, geographies, literatures, and contemporary legal and political issues of Native Americans of the United States and other indigenous peoples of the western hemisphere.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Seventeen faculty members in eleven departments and three colleges have a wide range of interests and expertise ranging from the archaeology of the Americas to Native American/First Nations women.

resources available: American Indian Science and Engineering Society chapter, American Indian Student Association, Native American Law Student Association, Latino/Native American Indian Cultural Center, Opportunity at Iowa (assistance to minority students).

financial aid available to students: Iowa First Nations program allows resident tuition to members of Nations historically connected to Iowa.. Also a wide range of scholarships is available through Opportunity at Iowa (http://www.uiowa.edu/~provost/oi/).

number of students in program: 27 Undergraduate Certificate, 3 Graduate Certificate.

distance learning: No.


University of Kansas

title of program: Indigenous Nations Studies Program; Tribal Law and Government Center

name\title of head\director: Dr. Michael J. Zogry, Director

degree(s) granted: M.A.; graduate certificate in Indigenous Studies; Joint M.A./J.D. program through the KU Law School

description of program offerings: The mission of the multi-disciplinary Indigenous Studies Program is to educate students and promote scholarship about the complexity and diversity of Indigenous peoples' cultures and histories, and to provide students with the knowledge to understand and assess the U.S. tribes' unique relationships to the US government. Indigenous Studies encourages appreciation of the contributions of Indigenous peoples to the global society, provides students with an understanding of the difficulties confronting tribal nations and offers foundational knowledge to assist them in finding innovative solutions to solve those problems. Students create an individualized areas of specialization.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: See the affiliate faculty page at http://www.indigenous.ku.edu for the most up-to-date information.

resources available: Indigenous Nations Studies Graduate Student Association, First Nations Student Association, Sabatini Multicultural Resource Center. Lawrence is also home to Haskell Indian Nations University and the Four Winds Native Center.

financial aid available to students: Some scholarships/grants available every year, but amounts vary.

number of students in program: [information not provided]

distance learning: [information not provided]


Lakehead University

title of program: Department of Indigenous Learning

name\title of head\director: Dennis McPherson, Chair

degree(s) granted: B.A. Indigenous Learning Major; H.B.A. Indigenous Learning Major; H.B.A. Indigenous Learning with major concentration in Women's Studies; H.B.A. of Social Work with a major concentration in Indigenous Learning; Minor Program in Indigenous Learning; Certificate in Indigenous Learning, Native Language Minor Program.

description of program offerings: The Department of Indigenous Learning is committed to providing both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students with a fundamental understanding of Aboriginal History, Culture and Values. The Department subscribes to the concept that a well rounded educational experience is acquired through a combination of traditional academic disciplines and culturally relevant/sensitive activites. Our Goals are to provide increasing awarness and appreciation of the life experience of Aboriginal Peoples, with the view to creating an environment of understanding and trust amongst all Peoples. Evolving out of the Native Studies Program, the Department was established by Lakehead University in 1994. Assuming the responsibility for the development and delivery of academic programs, the Department offers both a Bachelor of Arts and an Honours bachelor of Arts Program as well as the Certificate in Indigenous Learning Program. The Indigenous Learning Program features fifty Indigenous Learning courses of which twenty four courses are shared with other associated programs and departments. These include the following courses: Introduction to Ojibwe I, Introduction to Cree I, Introduction to Ojibwe II, Introduction to Cree II, Introduction to Indigenous Learning, Methods/Approaches Applied to Indigenous Learning, Native Arts and Crafts, The Archaeology of North America, Special Topics, Transfer of Educational Jurisdiction, Native Peoples and Newcomers, Native People and the North, Native Peoples and the Urban Community, Metis peoples of Canada, Community Well-Being and Native Peoples, Native Imagery, Introduction to Native Canadian Studies, Native People and the Past, Native People and the Government, Latin America and the Carribean, Literature of Canada's First Nations, Indigenous Peoples Myth and Drama, Native Canadian World Views, Corporations and the Status Indian, Research Methodology, The North American Fur Trade, Native Peoples and Community, Shelter in Native Communities, Aboriginal Peoples and the Law, Native People and the Land, Native People and the Issues, Native Narratives Myths Legends and Ceremonies, Gender Relations in the First Nations' Community, Indigenous Women and Health, Indigenous Women and their Changing Roles, The Rights of Aboriginal Peoples in S.35, Taxation and the Status Indian, Honours Project 1, Honours Project II, Politics in the Canadian North, Indigenous Peoples and the World, Social Work Practice and Aboriginal People, Aboriginal Self-Government in International Law.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: see http://indigenouslearning.lakeheadu.ca/staff.php?h=1

resources available: The Department of Indigenous Learning is supported by the Office of Aboriginal Initiatives, affiliated with Student Affairs and the Aboriginal Management Council, is headed by Vice-Provost, Aboriginal Initiatives. See http://aboriginalinitiatives.lakeheadu.ca/ . Besides the Oral History Collection maintained by the Department of Indigenous Learning Library resources on campus include the Northern Studies Resource Center. See http://library.lakeheadu.ca/wp/?pg=57.

financial aid available to students: Government funding, bursaries, scholarships.

number of students in program: Currently 286 students enrolled in courses offered by the Department of Indigenous Learning.

distance learning: no


Université Laval

title of program: Certificat en études autochtones

name\title of head\director: Natacha Gagné, Director of Undergraduate Programs

degree(s) granted: Certificate

description of program offerings: see the web site (http://www2.ulaval.ca/les-etudes/programmes/repertoire/details/certificat-en-etudes-autochtones.html) and list of courses included in the certificate (http://www.fss.ulaval.ca/cms/upload/ant/fichiers/gc_cert_aut_a13.pdf).

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Indigenous studies from the perspective of social and cultural anthropology; focus on Inuit studies and North-East Amerindians; expertise also on Mexican and South American native people. Issues: environmental studies, gender relations, self government, religious beliefs and practices, literature, health.

resources available: A number of professors from the Faculty of Social Sciences and the department of Anthropology (http://www.ant.ulaval.ca/index.php?pid=14); a major research center, the CIERA (Centre interuniversitaire d'études et de recherches autochtones) http://www.ciera.ulaval.ca/.

financial aid available to students: None.

number of students in program: 25

distance learning: We offer a certificate entirely on line (http://www.distance.ulaval.ca/fad/programmes/certificat-en-etudes-autochtones.htm) and a micro program of three courses (http://www2.ulaval.ca/les-etudes/programmes/repertoire/details/microprogramme-en-etudes-autochtones.html).


University of Lethbridge

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Leroy Little Bear, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. major; Special Case Masters.

description of program offerings: The Department of Native American Studies is a multi-disciplinary department that offers courses from a Native perspective in Native history, art, law, politics, language, and literature. It concerns itself with Native peoples of North America, their cultures, and the various relationships that have developed between Natives and non-Natives from the fifteenth century to the present day.
Recently, the NAS Department and Management worked together to reinvent the old BESS program (Business Enterprises and Self-governing Systems of Indian, Inuit, and Métis Peoples), which is now called the FNG (First Nations Governance) program in which Management now offers a Bachelor of Management degree with a major in Native American Studies. We also offer a major in Native American Teacher Education.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: See website for faculty bios and research interests at http://www.uleth.ca/fas/nas/listPeople.

resources available: Native Counsellor/Advisor (http://www.uleth.ca/ross/aboriginal/ind ex.html); Native American Students Association (http://www.uleth.ca/fas/nas/clubs.html); various other student resources (http://www.uleth.ca/reg/stuserv/index.html).

financial aid available to students: No.

number of students in program: Approximately 300-500 students enroll in NAS courses in any given semester.

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Maine

title of program: Native American Programs

name\title of head\director: Dr. Darren J. Ranco (Penobscot), Chair and Associate Professor of Anthropology

degree granted: Minor

description of program offerings: Native American Programs includes the Native American Studies Program and the Wabanaki Center, a student development, research and outreach center. Native American Studies is an interdisciplinary academic program open to all students, offering a minor in Native American Studies. The goal of the program is to teach students through Native perspectives, to understand Native people, their traditions, and their right to self-determination. The program offers a curriculum that focuses on understanding how differing value systems function and developing an appreciation for Native American culture and history, including the critical issues of sovereignty and treaty rights. The presence of the Wabanaki Tribes within the State of Maine provides a tie to the history, language, and vital culture unique to this State and is a major focus of the academic offerings. The minor involves 18 credits of course work focusing on Native Americans with three required NAS-designated courses: Introduction to Native American Studies, Topics in Native American Studies, and Theory and Research Methods in Native American Studies. The remaining courses are currently offered through the English, Anthropology, History, and Modern Languages & Classics Departments. Other courses will be developed in additional disciplines, in cooperation with the Native American Programs, in the near future.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: [Information not provided.]

resources available: Wabenaki Center (http://www.naps.umaine.edu/).

financial aid available to students: Tuition waiver is available to qualified Native students through the Wabanaki Center.

number of students in program: 28 in the Native American Studies minor; 200 participants in the Native American Tuition Waiver and Education Program.



distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Manitoba

title of program: Department of Native Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Renate Eigenbrod, Head

degree(s) granted: B.A. Major and Minor, M.A., Ph.D.

description of program offerings: Language: Instruction in Cree and Ojibway Language (and literature), introductory and advanced; Literature: Indigenous Literatures, both Canadian and International; Governance stream: Program offered on and off campus, includes a Business Minor. General Studies: includes politics, history, spirituality, healing, community economic development, representation, Indigenous film, literature and visual arts.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native Societies and the Political Process; Images of Indian People in North America; Aboriginal Title; History and Culture in Cumberland Sound; Aboriginal Peoples and the Canadian Justice System; Canadian Law and Aboriginal Peoples; Colonialism and Post-Colonial Theory; Dene Self Government; Oral History of Manitoba; Treaties; theories of decolonization; colonial interference and Aboriginal resistance strategies in the areas of literature, historiography, representation, identity, gender roles, industrial encroachment on Aboriginal (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) lands and resources, and governance; Métis History and political issues of the Inuit, First Nations and Métis people; Inuit Kinship and Social Organization; Inuit literature; Anglican Missionaries and Religious Change in the Eastern Arctic; Impact of the Nunavut Settlement on Smaller Arctic Communities; Continuing Land use Patterns among the people of Cumberland Sound; Aboriginal economy, economic development, community economic development, participatory research methodologies, governance and leadership; Metis Harvesting Claims and Historical Land Use Patterns; Land Use and Occupancy Mapping (Map Biographies).

resources available: Aboriginal Student Centre; Aboriginal Students Association; Elders in Residence; Office of University Accessibility; Annual Elders and Traditional Peoples Gathering; Annual Graduation Powwow. Other Academic departments: Aboriginal Business Education Program; Aboriginal Focus Program; Access Program.

financial aid available to students: Grants and Bursaries from various sources; information available through the Department of Native Studies and the Aboriginal Student Centre; special funding available for Aboriginal Ph.D. students..

number of students in program: n/a

distance learning: The program offers distance courses that can be accessed through the Aurora Student system which is updated every term. Our distance courses use section indicators beginning with "D."


University of Massachusetts

title of program: Certificate Program in Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Jean S. Forward, Director

department in which housed: Anthropology

degrees granted: Certificate (undergraduate, M.A., Ph.D.)

description of program offerings: Approximately 20 courses, some well-established, others offered irregularly. Nine courses in Anthropology, four in History, two in English, and one each in Afro-American Studies, Communication, Education, and STPEC (Social Thought and Political Economy). Students may also be advised to take one or more of the dozen courses offered by the Five Colleges consortium.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native American literatures; history; archaeology; anthropology; contemporary issues of the Northeast; and South and MesoAmerica.

resources available: Josephine White Eagle Cultural Center (http://www.umass.edu/native/jwecc/) contains a computer lab/study hall and library; one dorm floor is set aside for Native American students who choose to live with other Native students and Allies; Native American Students Services Program (http://www.umass.edu/native/); N.A.S.A.; A.I.S.E.S.

financial aid available to students: Native students from Massachusetts nations, e.g., Nipmuc and Wampanoag, may be eligible for a tuition waiver. Students enrolled in other recognized tribes but who reside in the state should consult James Peters of the Massachusetts Office of Indian Affairs. Otherwise, students apply for the standard aid packages available to all students.

number of students in program: Approximately 15 at the inception of the program; 90 Native and non-Native students enrolled have graduated since 1998.

distance learning: no

 
[See also listing for Five Colleges, Inc.]


McMaster University

title of program: Indigenous Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Dr. Dawn Martin-Hill

degree(s) granted: B.A.

description of program offerings: Three-year Combined BA in Indigenous Studies and another subject; Indigenous Studies Minor

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology, Social Justice, Political Science, History, Native Literatures, Native Languages.

resources available: Student Club, Indigenous Student Counsellor, Resource Library, Computer Lab, Student Lounge, Elder In Residence, a food station and administrative services all located in the Indigenous Studies Program.

financial aid available to students: Government funding, bursaries, scholarships, Paul R. MacPherson Bursary, Harvey Longboat Memorial Scholarship for Indigenous Students.

number of students in program: 12

distance learning: no


University of Michigan

title of program: Native American Studies Program

department in which housed: Program in American Culture

name\title of head\director: Michael Witgen, Director

degree(s) granted: B.A. minor

description of program offerings: Please visit our website.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: History, Literature, Women's Studies, Psychology, Anthropology, Ojibwe language, African American Studies.

resources available: NASA, NALSA, AISES, Office of Multicultural Initiatives, Multi-ethnic Student Affairs, William Clements Library, Bentley Historical Library, Graduate Library, Museum of Anthropology.

financial aid available to students: See financial aid office.

number of students in program: [information not provided.]

distance learning: We do not offer distance learning programs beyond the course-share program available through the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (Big 10 Schools plus Univ. of Chicago).


Michigan State University

title of program: American Indian Studies Program (AISP)

name\title of head\director: Dr. Le Anne E. Silvey, Director

degree(s) granted: Specialization (interdisciplinary minor)

description of program offerings: The American Indian Studies Program offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate specialization that broadens students' understanding of Native cultures, history, and current issues with an emphasis on Native peoples of the Midwest. Enrollment in the specialization, which is open to all undergraduates, requires the written approval of the AISP director. The specialization is completed while a student is enrolled in a separate degree-granting program.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: 26 affiliated faculty with expertise in the following areas: American Indian anthropology and archaeology, including urban Indian issues, Native women, Native language retention, indigenous archaeology. American Indian families, parenting, grandparenting, elder issues. American Indian history, including contact, fur trade and early U.S. eras; Canadian First Nations and border history. Indigenous law and policy, including tribal law. Ojibwe language, including instruction at first, second, and third year levels. American Indian health. Native literature and rhetorics.

resources available: North American Indigenous Student Organization (NAISO), freshman retention program (Aanii), American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) chapter, Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers group, North American Indigenous Faculty Staff Association (EAGLE), Nokomis Learning Center, Indigenous Law and Policy Center.

financial aid available to students: Michigan Indian tuition waiver program for enrolled members of federally recognized tribes or American Indians with BIA certification. To qualify for the tuition waiver, students must also be citizens of Michigan, which means at least a one-year residency.

number of students in program: 17 undergraduates pursuing AISP specialization; 35 affiliated graduate students.

distance learning: no


Mills College

title of program: Ethnic Studies

department in which housed: Ethnic Studies

name\title of head\director: Julia Oparah, Chair

degrees granted: B.A.

description of program offerings: The Ethnic Studies Department prepares Mills students for leadership and development in an increasingly multicultural, transnational, and globalized society by studying the rich history of ethnic and racial diversity in the United States from the perspectives of peoples of color. The department's curriculum promotes critical thinking and creative analysis through comparative study of the social, economic, cultural, and environmental concerns and contributions of American Indians and Alaska Natives, African Americans, Latinas/os and Chicanas/os, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders. At Mills, we examine racial dynamics as they intersect with gender, sexuality, class, and nation, and many of our courses focus on the unique experiences of women of color. Our curriculum also explores the transnational and diasporic dimensions of racial identities.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: History, Anthropology, Film, Sociology, Geography, Women's Studies, Queer Studies, Environmental Studies, and Literature.

resources available: Community involvement with Intertribal Friendship House, American Indian Charter School, Native American Health Center; Indigenous Women's Alliance.

financial aid available to students: General college plan.

number of students in program: about 20 American Indian students in the college.

distance learning: no


University of Minnesota Duluth

title of program: American Indian Studies and Master of Tribal Administration and Governance

name\title of head\director: Professor Tadd M. Johnson, Esq., Department Chair and Director of Graduate Studies

degree(s) granted: B.A (major and minor) in American Indian Studies; Master of Tribal Administration and Governance

description of program offerings: American Indian Studies (AIS) is an interdisciplinary academic department offering coursework committed to broadening knowledge of the worldview, histories, languages, literatures, cultures, arts and contemporary experiences of American Indian nations and peoples. As American Indian nations maintain a distinct political relationship with the federal government rooted in historical treaties, congressional laws, and executive orders, AIS promotes an awareness for and understanding of tribal sovereignty and self-determination. AIS strives to protect the integrity and identity of the indigenous population of North America and to create an intellectual learning environment conducive to critical and creative thought. A bachelors of arts degree in American Indian studies is designed to give students a broad background while allowing concentrated study in an area(s) of interest. The core of the program includes study in Ojibwe language, historical and contemporary foundations, politics and law, art and literature, and societies and cultures. Majors and minors develop skills in analytical and critical thinking as well as verbal and written communication. They acquire knowledge of historical and contemporary American Indian experiences, cultures, and (inter)governmental affairs. Additionally, students may focus their area of study in Ojibwe language.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Literature, intellectual history, political theory, diplomacy, global indigenous studies, American Indian Literature, Anishinaabeg Studies, Federal Indian Policy, Federal Indian Law, Tribal Governance, and Indian gaming.

resources available: Anishinaabe Student Organization

financial aid available to students: [information not provided]

number of students in program: 15 majors

distance learning: Not at this time.


University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Jean O'Brien, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. major and minor.

description of program offerings: Courses include Indigenous Peoples: An American Perspective; Indigenous Peoples: A Global Perspective; American Indian History to 1840; American Indian History, 1840-Present; American Indian Art; American Indian Literature; Dakota History and Culture; Ojibwe History and Culture; Dakota Language: Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced; Ojibwe Language: Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced; American Indian Women; History of American Indian Education; American Indian Philosophies; American Indian Law; Law, Sovereignty, and Treaty Rights; Tribal Government; Change and Development in Indian Communities; Federal Indian Policy; Contemporary American Indian Movements; American Indians and the Cinema; American Indians and Photography; and a wide variety of special topics courses, directed studies and research; and internship opportunities.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Interest in Native literature, art, film, and photography, philosophy, Dakota and Ojibwe languages, culture and history, American Indian history, federal policy, law, and treaty rights, political economy.

resources available: American Indian Culture House; Center of Indigenous Nations (COIN); American Indian Student Cultural Center; Dakota and Ojibwe Language Societies.

financial aid available to students: Please contact the American Indian Admission Recruiter, (612) 624-9565.

number of students in program: Approximately 50 majors and 30 minors.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Minot State University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Joseph C. Jastrzembski, Professor of History

degree(s) granted: Minor; concentration.

description of program offerings: Native American Art, Native American Literature, American Indian History, Peoples and Cultures of Native North America, Great Plains Indians, Native American Social History, Contemporary Issues with Native American Families, Pharmaceutical Ethnobotany.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Art, Biology, GeoSciences, History, Sociology, Social Work, English.

resources available: Native American Cultural Center; Native American Cultural Awareness Club; Multicultural Center; Annual Powwow; Gordon Olson Library: large collection of Native American books and periodicals; MSU's Native American On-line Museum, coming soon. MSU is centrally located to four North Dakota reservations/tribes: Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, Three Affiliated Tribes of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation, Spirit Lake Dakotah Nation, and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. MSU has memorandums of understanding with the Turtle Mountain Community College and the Fort Berthold Community College (Three Affiliated Tribes).

financial aid available to students: Diversity Tuition Waiver.

number of students in program: [information not provided]

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Montana

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: David R. M. Beck

degrees granted: B.A. major and minor.

description of program offerings: As an academic department, our primary goal is to provide and maintain the highest possible academic standards for our students and ourselves. It is the mission of the Native American Studies department to teach critical skills of writing, research, communication, and analysis which focus on the subject matter of American Indian history, literature, ecological views, language, spiritual belief systems, philosophy and contemporary concerns; and to teach about cultural diversity from the perspectives of indigenous people of this country. The Native American Studies major is interdisciplinary, offering courses from sovereignty to history to literature, and provides an opportunity for critical analysis and evaluation of the experience, perspectives, and continued evolution of Native cultures and history as diverse people. Native American Studies, as an academic discipline, is committed to examining the contemporary and ancient experiences and ways of life of the first Americans from their perspective. The curriculum is designed to provide a study of American Indians from a holistic and humanistic viewpoint by focusing upon their cultural, historical, and contemporary life. Courses are designed for both Native American and non-Native American students so they can better understand human similarities and differences, thereby leading to the development of increased communications and good interpersonal relationships.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Kathryn Shanley - Native American Literature: Native American Autobiography, the work of James Welch, contemporary American Indian literature, and post-colonial theory; Richmond Clow - History: Plains Indian History and Ecological Perspectives; Dave Beck - History, tribal sovereignty, federal policy and law, sustainable community development, twentieth century American Indian history, urban Indian history; Neyooxet Greymorning - Anthropology, Political Anthropology, Native Language Revitalization, Aboriginal Sovereignty, Global Development & Indigenous Peoples, and Native Ethnobotany; Wade Davies - American Indian history, American Indian sporting traditions, history of American Indian health care.

resources available: A variety of resources are available. We have services offered through the University, plus several clubs/organizations, the University library, plus more.

financial aid available to students: Several forms of financial aid available, including Indian Fee Waiver (if qualified), Work/Study program, and scholarships.

number of Native American students: 800 at the University.

distance learning: no.


Montana State University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Walter Fleming, Department Head

degrees granted: M.A. in Native American Studies; B.A. Minor in Native American Studies; On-line Graduate Certificate in Native American Studies

description of program offerings: Native American Studies (NAS) offers an interdisciplinary program of study through a nonteaching minor in Native American Studies as well as opportunities for students to gain a multicultural perspective in meeting the University's core curriculum requirements. The program is flexible enough to meet individual needs of students through opportunities for independent study, small group seminars, internships, and special topics courses.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Montana Indians, Plains Indians, Indian policy and law, American Indian art, American Indian religion, American Indian literature, American Indian education.

resources available: AISES; Native American Peer Advisors. NAS works closely with the seven Indian reservations in Montana and the seven Indian community colleges on the reservations. The Museum of the Rockies Indian Collection is located on campus.

financial aid available to students: Graduate teaching assistantships; Montana students receive an Indian fee waiver (based on need), and several small scholarships are available. Students must go through the Financial Aid Office for funding.

number of students in program: 500 Native students, 30 Masters students, 25 Graduate Certificate students, 30 declared minors; c. 500 students/ semester enrolled in Native American Studies courses.

distance learning: We are now offering online classes through MSU Extended University (http://btc.montana.edu/courses/aspx/ credit.aspx) and offer an Online Graduate Certificate in Native American Studies.


Montana State University Billings

title of program: Native American Studies Minor

name\title of head\director: Dr. Jeff Sanders

degree(s) granted: Minor in Native American Studies; BSLS ( Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies) with a concentration in Native American Studies.

description of program offerings: C. 15 courses including Social Issues, Literature, Law, Art, Montana Indian Groups, Native Americans and the Environment, Native American Philosophies, Federal Indian Law, and Federal Indian Policy.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Federal law and policy, environment, Indian women, literature, contemporary social issues, Indian Education.

resources available: American Indian Outreach Office, Intertribal Indian Club, Intertribal Clan Mothers.

financial aid available to students: Financial aid is available to enrolled members of federally recognized tribes ( through a state tuition fee waiver).

number of students in program: 30

distance learning: Yes.


Montana State University - Northern

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Jaakko Puisto

degree(s) granted: minor

description of program offerings: See website.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: History, English, Literature.

resources available: Sweetgrass Society (Native student organization), annual pow wow.

financial aid available to students: Yes - check with financial aid office.

number of students in program: c. 15 minors in NAS.

distance learning: Some courses.


Mount Holyoke College

[See listing for Five Colleges, Inc.]


University of Nebraska, Lincoln

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Cynthia Willis Esqueda, Director

degrees granted: B.A. major and minor; Ph.D. and M.A. with an emphasis in Native American Studies.

description of program offerings: Courses focus on Anthropology, Plains Ethnology, Native American Literature, History, Psychology, Sociology, and more.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology, English, Geography, Ethnic Studies, Psychology, Sociology, History, and Law.

resources available: The Campus Indian Students Club (UNITE - UNited InterTribal Exchange) sponsors programs, an annual pow-wow, and visiting speakers/lecturers. The university is home to the University of Nebraska Press which publishes American Indian Quarterly and many other outstanding Native American publications. The Native American Public Television (NAPT) is also housed at the university. Native American Studies promotes an awareness of Native American culture and knowledge to students, the university, the community, and national and international audiences.

financial aid available to students: Full scholarships are available to some Native American students. Partial scholarships may also be available.

number of students in program: [Information not provided.]

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Nebraska at Omaha

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Eduardo Zendejas, Director

degrees granted: Minor (undergraduate and graduate) in Native American Studies; also, B.A./B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies (Native American Studies concentration), Bachelor of General Studies ("BGS") with Native American Studies concentration.

description of program offerings: Introduction to Native American Studies, Peoples and Cultures of Native North America, North American Archaeology, Native American Literature, History of North American Indians, History of the Sioux Tribe, History of Native American Education, History of Native American Environmentalism, Native American Religion, Social Work with American Indians, Tribal Government, Federal Indian Law, Indian Child Welfare Act, Indian Gaming, Native American Film, Creative Spirit.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Jessiline Anderson (Psychology and Counseling) Timi Barone (Medical Anthropology) Audrey DeFrank (Library Science); Brady DeSanti (Native American Religion and History); Teresa Lamsam(School of Communications); Hugh Reilly (School of Communications); Jeanne Reames (History); Michele Desmarais (Religious Studies); Linda Parker (Library Science); Denny Smith (History); Barbara Robins (Native American Literature); David Peterson (English); Judith Boss (English); Michael Carroll (Goodrich Program); Bruce Johansen (School of Communications); Beth Ritter (Anthropology); Lyn M. Holley (Gerontology); Dale Stover Religious Studies); Michael Tate (History); Mark Scherer (History); Ed Zendejas (Federal Indian Law & Tribal Government); Maunka Morgan (Native American Studies); Sheila Rocha (Native American Studies).

resources available: UNO Intertribal Student Council (ITSC), scholarships, Native American student recruitment/retention specialist, Native American Studies Alumni Association(NASAA). Our program maintains a close relationship with the Native American peoples of Omaha and Nebraska at large. We provide outreach programs and a host of public speakers, honoring ceremonies, and other presentations throughout the year.

financial aid available to students: Goodrich Scholarship Program for Minority Students; Thompson Learning Community; Pearl Blizek NAS Scholarship; Virginia Frank NAS Scholarship.

number of students in program: 50 undergraduate minors, 4 BGS concentrations, 10 graduate minors; 90 Native students on campus.

distance learning: occasional course offerings


University of New Mexico

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Gregory Cajete, Ph.D., Director

degrees granted: Major and Minor in Native American Studies (undergraduate only). NAS will be seeking a graduate degree program.

description of program offerings: The major degree requires completion of 36 credit hours. Students must take 18 hours of the required core courses. Twelve hours must be from one of the four concentration in NAS in Education and Language; Leadership and Self Determination; Arts and Literature; and Interdisciplinary Cultural and Environmental Studies. The remaining 6 hours must be upper division courses from the concentrations or from courses with significant Native American content offered by other departments, which are subject to approval by the Director. The minor degree requires completion of 24 credit hours: 15 hours of required courses with the remaining 9 credit-hours distributed across 3 areas of concentration (Education & Communication; Expressive Arts & Technology; Governance, Law & Economics; Health & Environment; History, Politics & Ethics; Language & Literature; Science, Religion & Philosophy; Societies & Cultures). In support of the undergraduate minor, 29 courses in Native American Studies have been approved. Senior level (400) courses may be taken for graduate level credit.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: NAS faculty and affiliate faculty draw from a large body of academics and practitioners. Presently, 30 Native faculty are found in a wide array of disciplines across campus. Regular NAS Ph.D. faculty include Gregory A. Cajete (Santa Clara Pueblo), Lloyd Lee (Diné, Beverly Singer (Santa Clara Pueblo/Navajo), and Maria Williams (Tlingit). Part-time NAS faculty include J.D. (Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara) and Tiffany Lee, Ph.D. (Lakota/Navajo).

resources available: New Mexico is rich in Native culture and community resources. Facilities and programs that are housed in Native American Studies academic department include the 3000+ volume NAS library which includes the highly acclaimed Reno Collection.

financial aid available to students: The NAS faculty awards merit-based scholarship to Native students enrolled at UNM and in the degree granted program; students must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50.

number of students in program: Currently, there are 1,500 Native students enrolled and attending UNM main campus. Approximately 100 students have declared a minor in Native American Studies.

distance learning: Each semester one or two courses are offered by distance learning.


New Mexico State University

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Dept. of Anthropology

name\title of head\director: Donald Pepion, College Associate Professor through Miriam Chaiken, Department Head

degrees granted: Interdisciplinary Minor in American Indian Studies and M.A. Minor in Native American Studies under Anthropology (open to all disciplines).

description of program offerings: The program focuses upon Native American cultures and societies, as well as the contemporary and historical experience of the American Indian. Courses include Native Peoples of North America, American Indian Literature, Contemporary Native Americans, American Indian History Federal Indian Policy, and others. The Graduate Minor offers Federal Indian Policy, Issues in Native American Studies, and Indigenous Ways of Knowing. Some of the American Indian Studies courses are offered on line http://www.nmsu.edu/. The minor programs have strong support and integration with the bachelors and masters programs in the four fields of Anthropology. The NMSU Museum under the Anthropology Department offers courses in museumology.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native American ethnology, Blackfeet Studies, Plains Indians, Linguistics, Meso American Peoples, and Archeology.

resources available: The American Indian Program and the Indian Resource Development Program at NMSU offer support services for Native American students.

financial aid available to students: A scholarship is available for Native American students taking the minor degree programs. NMSU also has an endowed scholarship for Native American students. Scholarship information is available through the American Indian Program and the Indian Resources Development Program at NMSU.

number of students in program: An average of 20 students are taking minor degree programs and many more enroll in the courses.

distance learning: One or two of the minor degree programs' courses are offered online each semester.


University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Dan Cobb, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: B.A. major, B.A. minor, concentration

description of program offerings: Introduction to the Cultures and Histories of Native North America, Approaches to American Indian Studies, Native American History: The East, Native American History: The West, Native American Tribal Studies, Native America in the 20th Century, Introduction to American Indian Literatures, Native Americans in Film, American Indian Novels: Facing East from Indian Country, Archaeology of North American Indians, Field School in North American Archaeology, American Indian Societies, Some courses are also cross listed in the Anthropology and History Departments.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian culture, literature, history, anthropology, and archaeology.

resources available: American Indian Center programs (http://americanindiancenter.unc.edu/), Carolina Indian Circle (undergraduate), First Nations Graduate Circle (graduate), American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), Native American Law Students Association (NALSA), Alpha Pi Omega Sorority, Phi Sigma Nu Fraternity, American Indian Graduate Colloquium Series, VOICES.

financial aid available to students: Yes, Contact the UNC Scholarship and Student Aid Office (http://studentaid.unc.edu/) including: The Pogue Scholarship, North Carolina American Indian Incentive Grant, and other scholarships, grants, loans, work-study.

number of students in program: approximately 10-20

distance learning: no


University of North Carolina at Pembroke

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Mary Ann Jacobs, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. major, minor, or concentration.

description of program offerings: In addition to core courses, majors select one of four tracks: Peoples and Histories Focus, Stories and Literatures Focus, Social and Cultural Issues Focus, or General Focus. Courses include Introduction to American Indian Studies, North American Indian History, Latin American History and Culture, Indians of the Southeast, Federal Policy, American Indian Religious Traditions, American Indian Literatures, Indian Residential and Boarding School Narratives, American Indian Sports Heritage, American Indian Art History, Indigenous Women, American Indian Health, American Indian Education, Native American Populations, Archaeology in North Carolina, Contemporary Issues of American Indians, Video Ethnography, American Indian Indians and Film, and Special Topics courses. Most courses are also cross-listed in the Art, Literature, History, Religion, Sociology and Social Work departments.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native American literature, health, religion, folklore, oral traditions, archaeology, art, education, Southeastern Indian history and culture (particularly Indigenous groups and tribes of NC), travel-study opportunities, and social service provision in Native American communities.

resources available: Native American Resource Center (museum), Native American Student Organization, the Native American Student Movement, American Indian Science and Engineering Society, American Indian Fraternities and Sororities and the Southeast Indian Studies Conference (first week in April).

financial aid available to students: Several small scholarships (awarded annually).

number of students in program: 15 - 25 majors, minors and concentrations.

distance learning: Online courses in Intro to American Indian Studies, Federal Policy, Federal Indian Law, and Native American Literature.


University of North Carolina-Wilmington

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: English

name\title of head\director: Lee Schweninger, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: B.A. Minor

description of program offerings: Anthropology of Native Americans; American Indian Literatures; American Indian History; Native South Americans; Native North Americans; New World Archeology; Ethnohistory of Southeastern Indians; Native American Religious Traditions; American Indians in the 20th Century; other appropriate courses may satisfy the elective requirements if approved by the coordinator.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native American Literatures, Schweninger; American Indian History, LaVere; Native American Religion, Walt Conser; Anthropology, Patricia Lerch (ethnology and ethnography).

resources available: Student Indian Cultural Association.

financial aid available to students: none.

number of students in program: 2-3.

distance learning: no


North Carolina State University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Judy Kertesz, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: minor

description of program offerings: 15 credit hour academic minor.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native Peoples and Cultures of North America, Native American Literature, Native American History, Andean South America, The American West, Early American Frontier.

resources available: Office of Native American Student Affairs; Native American Student Organization; Native American Pow Wow.

financial aid available to students: [Information not provided]

number of students in program: [Information not provided]

distance learning: [Information not provided]


University of North Dakota

title of program: Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Sebastian Braun, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. major or minor.

description of program offerings: The Indian Studies program offers an expanded approach to the study of American Indian history and contemporary Native cultures and societies. It also promotes a multidisciplinary understanding of historic and contemporary political and economic realities. The department is engaged in enabling the University to serve reservation communities. Courses include: Federal Law and Native Communities; Ethnohistory of North America; American Indian Languages; Health and American Indian Cultures; Sustainable Communities; Native Cultural Landscapes; Dynamics of Conquest; Education and American Indians; American Indian Women.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Degrees in anthropology, literature, history. Ecology, ethnohistory, politics, economic development, identity, literature, gender roles, early history, oral traditions, Plains and Woodlands cultures, languages, community health, education.

resources available: Indian Studies Association (student organization). UND has an American Indian Student Services center. North Dakota has four Indian reservations: Turtle Mountain, Fort Berthold, Devils Lake, and Standing Rock. Other close reservation communities in Minnesota include Red Lake, Cass Lake, and White Earth in Minnesota, Sisseton-Wahpeton, and Canadian First Nation communities. UND libraries offer a good collection of American Indian resources and hold important American Indian documents in special collections. the Indian Studies Department has close relations to the Law School, which offers a specialization in American Indian Law. UND students organize an annual Powwow and Time Out Week in spring, which is a week-long presentation of American Indian issues. UND offers INMED, INPSYCH and other programs, and has a very active McNair program to encourage underrepresented students attend graduate school.

financial aid available to students: Tuition waivers through the University, including a number of minority tuition waivers, are available to all students.

number of students in program: around 30 majors and minors.

distance learning: no.


Northeastern State University

title of program: American Indian Studies

department in which housed: Cherokee and Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Benjamin R. Kracht, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. major or minor; B.A., Cherokee Cultural Studies; B.A.E. Cherokee

description of program offerings: The American Indian Studies program offers a multidisciplinary approach to understanding Native American peoples. Courses are offered in anthropology, history, English and languages, political science, criminal justice, and social work; majors and minors also have access to the Cherokee language program (Harry Oosahwee, Coordinator). The Cherokee Cultural Studies program involves studies of the Cherokee language and in depth studies of Cherokee history. Students can specialize in Cultural Heritage, Language Revitalization, or Self-Determination and Sovereignty. The B.A.E. Cherokee program prepares future Cherokee language teachers working in immersion environments. Classes involve Cherokee language studies, skills and knowledge in language acquisition, cultural awareness, and teaching methods and practices.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Faculty have a broad background in Native American subjects; however, the principle areas of interest\expertise are Southeastern Tribes, particularly the so called Five Civilized Tribes; Plains Indians; and Mesoamerica (incl. fieldwork in Belize).

resources available: Tahlequah is the historic capital of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. The headquarters of the Cherokee Nation are located nearby. The Cherokee National Historical Society and the Cherokee Heritage Center are at Park Hill, about three miles south of Tahlequah. The Special Collections Division of the University Library contains extensive and well-maintained resources about the Five Civilized Tribes with a particular emphasis on the Cherokee Indians. The University supports an active chapter of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society and an Amerian Indian scholars honors program. The Northeastern State University Center for Tribal Studies offers non-credit workshops about contemporary Indian issues, and an annual Indian Symposium is presented each spring on campus. The Office of Student Affairs sponsors a Native American Students Association. Indigenous Scholars Program. There are fieldwork opportunities for students in southwestern Oklahoma, as well as internships with historical societies and museums in northeastern Oklahoma.

financial aid available to students: Contact: Director, Student Financial Services, Northeastern State University, Tahlequah OK 74464, (918) 456-5511 ext. 3456.

number of students in program: c. 20 majors.

distance learning: there are some distance learning components, as well as several online classes. More online classes are being added to the curriculum, in addition to distance learning classes,


Northern Arizona University

title of program: Applied Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Professor Octaviana V. Trujillo (Yaqui), Chair

degree(s) granted: B.A., B.S. (major and minor).

description of program offerings: The mission of Applied Indigenous Studies is to prepare students to assume leadership roles in indigenous communities and institutions for the twenty-first century. In addition to involving students with knowledge of tribal histories and cultures, federal policies, and contemporary reservation conditions, the curriculum provides students with tools and experience for contributing to those communities. Our students gain skills in academic areas of critical need such as economic development, cultural resource management, traditional knowledge, policy articulation, and environmental studies, as well as learn how to apply those skills in such settings.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: North American, Central American, and South American Indian history; traditional knowledge; political organization and federal/tribal legal relations; economic development; environmental and ecosystem management studies; comparative indigenous political movements and relations to state powers; language policy and education; health delivery and food systems; anthropology and sociology concerning Southwestern indigenous peoples.

resources available: Traditional Navajo Hogan, Native American Student Services, Institute for Native Americans, Center for American Indian Economic Development, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, American Indians Science & Engineering Society (AISES), Native American Business Organization (NABO), and other student organizations.

financial aid available to students: Federal and state financial aid programs; tribal and university scholarships.

number of students in program: About 40 majors and dual majors, 20 minors. Native American student enrollment at NAU is 1,303 representing at least forty tribes; NAU has one of the largest enrollments of Native American students of any four-year university in the United States. NAU also boasts strong partnerships and collaborative programs with over 70 Native American tribes throughout the southwest and beyond.

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Northern British Columbia

title of program: First Nations Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Ross Hoffman, Chair

degree(s) granted: M.A., B.A., 8 Certificates, 2 Diplomas.

description of program offerings: [See website.] FNST courses are also offered at UNBC's regional campuses: in Quesnel (Southern Region), Terrace and Prince Rupert and at Wilp Wilxo'oskwhl Nisga'a Institute (WWNI) in Gitwinksihlkw (Western Region).

areas of faculty interest\expertise: We have 4 tenure/tenure track faculty and approximately 8 adjunct faculty members and 7 sessional instructors some of whom are community members (Elders, et cetera). A full list of their areas of expertise is on our web site.

resources available: First Nations Centre, Northern Advancement Program; FNST undergrad student advisor Jennifer Cole; MA grad advisor, Dr. Antonia Mills.

financial aid available to students: Various scholarships, fellowships, and awards.

number of students in program: 20 B.A. full time equivalents (FTE), 20 M.A. FTE

distance learning: We are presently not offering distance learning.


Northern Kentucky University

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy

name\title of head\director: Sharlotte Neely, Ph.D., Director

degrees granted: B.A., B.S. w/ minor in Native American Studies.

description of program offerings: Anthropology courses on North American Indians, Indians of Mesoamerica, Modern American Indians, North American archaeology, Mesoamerican Archaeology, Art and Culture, Museum Methods, Prehistoric Ecology, Cultural Anthropology, and a web-based course called Native Americans; history courses on Plains Indians and History of the Indians of the United States; geography course on Diversity Mapped; sociology course on World Patterns of Race and Ethnicity and Native American social issues; and topics courses in English, religious studies, sociology, and anthropology.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, history, geography, sociology, religious studies, literature, law, Cherokee, Creek, Shawnee, Ojibwa, Lakota Sioux, Coeur d'Alene, Blackfoot, Dine' (Navajo), Hopi, Eyak, Aztec, Maya, North American and Mesoamerican prehistory and history, and Indians of the Ohio Valley.

resources available: Annual award to "Outstanding Native American Studies Student," First Nations Student Organization, Student Anthropology Society, annual trip to Pine Ridge in SD, annual archaeology field school at prehistoric Fort Ancient village site in KY, NKU Museum of Anthropology, Kentucky Native American Heritage Commission, Kentucky Center for Native American Art and Culture, Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, Cincinnati Art Museum, and nearby archaeological sites and exhibits.

financial aid available to students: Available through the University.

number of students in program: 10 Native American studies minors and 110 anthropology majors.

distance learning: web-based courses on "Cultural Anthropology" and "Native Americans;" more courses planned.


Northern Michigan University

title of program: Center for Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: April Lindala, Director and Associate Professor

degrees granted: Interdisciplinary minor in Native American Studies; (in cooperation with the School of Education and Leadership) M.A. in Educational Administration with an American Indian Education Concentration.

description of program offerings: The mission statement: the Center for Native American Studies offers a holistic curriculum rooted in Native American themes that challenges students to think critically and communicate effectively about Indigenous issues with emphasis on Great Lakes Indigenous perspectives; stimulates further respectful inquiry about Indigenous people; and provides active learning and service learning opportunities that strengthen student engagement, interaction, and reciprocity with Indigenous communities.
     The NMU Center for Native American Studies offers an inter-disciplinary minor that provides students with the opportunity to learn about the Indigenous people of North America through the works of Native Scholars past and present. Learning from a Native American perspective will be very beneficial for those students who are entering the fields of Anthropology, Art and Design, Criminal Justice, Education, History, English, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and Social Work. 
     NMU offers a Masters of Education Administration with the American Indian Education concentration. This program is designed to meet the needs of k-12 educators who work in or with American Indian programs, institutions, and organizations. This program is endorsed by the Tribal Education Departments National Assembly - TEDNA.
    Two of our courses, NAS 212 - Michigan/Wisconsin: Tribes, Treaties and Current Issues and NAS 485 - American Indian Education (with pre-approved plan) meet the Wisconsin Public Act 31 teaching requirement.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anishinaabe Language, Culture and Community, Anishinaabe Language: Seasonal Exploration (Fall, Winter, Spring/Summer), American Indian Education, American Indian Educational Law and Leadership, Native American Experience, American Indians: Identity and Media Images, First Nations Women, Native American Beadwork Styles, History of Indian Boarding School Education, Native Cultures and the Dynamics of the Religious Experience, Politics of Indian Gaming, Sacred Grounds: Native Peoples and Mother Earth, Native American Women and Storytelling, Tribal Law & Government, Indigenous Environmental Movements, Kinomaage: Earth Shows Us the Way, and Michigan/Wisconsin: Tribes, Treaties and Current Issues and Native American Service Learning Project. Many Native American Studies courses promote active learning and tribal community inclusion. Additional research/expertise includes: Anishinaabe Art, Tribal Capacity Building and Governance, Indigenous Eco-Justice and Policy, American Indian Civil Rights and Activism, Contemporary American Indian Issues. Full time NAS faculty members include Martin Reinhardt, Ph.D. and Kenn Pitawanakwat. Additional faculty members include Shirley Brozzo, Grace Chaillier, Aimee Cree Dunn, and Violet Friisvall.

resources available: The NMU Center for Native American Studies (Center) is home to an extensive resource room of books, journals, videos and other texts. The Center offers directed studies and internships, as well as access to a traditional fire site. The Center oversees a retention program designed to build community for Native American students known as the Native American Student Empowerment Initiative. Through this initiative, NMU students have been able to attend a wild rice harvesting camp on the Lac Vieux Desert reservation and a traditional brain tanning workshop on the Mole Lake reservation. Also through this initiative, students have attended workshops to make hand drums, raw hide rattles, 3-D dreamcatchers, moccasins and much more. The Native American Student Association meets weekly at the Center and annually hosts the First Nations Food Taster and the "Learning to Walk Together" traditional powwow. The Native American Student Association also produces the newsletter, Anishinaabe News. NMU is also home to a Multicultural Education and Resource Center that provides services to Native American students.

financial aid available to students: Michigan Indian Tuition Waiver (for qualified students); Bureau of Indian Affairs grants; Higher Education Grants from Tribes; Board of Trustees Grants, Triple A Scholarships; and King*Chavez*Parks Future Faculty Fellowships (for students enrolled in a M.A. program). Work study and Pell grants are available for students who meet financial aid criteria.

number of students in program: There are 192 Native American students enrolled at NMU in Fall of 2013. There are 38 students enrolled in the NAS minor and there are 2 students with an individually created baccalaurate program with a concentration in Native American Studies.

distance learning: Several NMU classes are available on-line. Native American Studies classes available on-line include: NAS 204-Native American Experience, NAS 330-Native Cultures and the Dynamics of the Religious Experience, NAS 414-First Nations Women, NAS 485-American Indian Education, and NAS 486-American Indian Educational Law and Leadership.


Northland College

title of program: Native American Studies Department

name\title of head\director: Joe Rose, Director

degrees granted: B.A., B.S.

description of program offerings: Ojibway Language; Native American History, Literature, Law, Song and Dance, and Arts and Crafts.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: 70% of faculty hold doctorates or other appropriate terminal degrees.

resources available: The Native American Student Association, the Anishinabe Culture Center, and the Anishinabe Museum.

financial aid available to students: [Information not provided.]

number of students in program: 30 full-time Native American students, as well as numerous Non-Native students, enrolled in NAS courses.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Ohio State University

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Christine Ballengee Morris, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: Ohio State University offers undergraduate and graduate courses in American Indian studies in the departments of English, Comparative Studies, History, Anthropology, and Art Education. An interdisciplinary center for the study of Ohio's ancient earthworks and Native heritage is at OSU-Newark. The Office of American Indian Student Services supports students at OSU and collaborates in developing initiatives. Native students are involved in a number of academic, activist, and social organizations.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: English, Comparative Studies, History, Anthropology, and Art Education

resources available: American Indian Student Services, American Indian Alumni Society, American Indian Council, AISES

financial aid available to students: Some.

number of students in program: [Information not provided.]

distance learning: We are finalizing our online program in Museum Education in the Art Education--it will be a Master online program with an emphasis in American Indian Studies.


University of Oklahoma

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Gus Palmer, Jr., Interim Director

degrees granted: B.A. (Interdisciplinary major and minor); M.A. (see below).

description of program offerings: The Native American Studies major is an interdisciplinary degree offered in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students take a core of courses offered by NAS faculty and select from courses in Native American Studies and from several departments, including Anthropology, English, History, Music, Fine Arts, and Geography. Students also have the opportunity to take one of a number of Native languages which the University offers. These include Cherokee, Cheyenne, Choctaw, Creek and Kiowa.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian Education Policy, Tribal Economic Development, American Indian history; plains Indian ethnography; contemporary American Indian and Canadian Native literature; contemporary educational, social, political, and cultural issues in Oklahoma Indian tribes; American Indian art history, contemporary Indian artists; Higher Education and American Indians, relationships between Indigenous nations and anthropology, research ethics, and global Indigenous issues.

resources available: American Indian students can take advantage of the American Indian Student Support Services which provides academic support, counseling, financial aid advisement, and sponsors student activities. There are 11 American Indian student associations on the OU campus. The Oklahoma Museum of Natural History houses an extensive collection of archaeological and ethnographic materials. The Western History Collections contain original manuscripts and published works on the west and American Indians, including works on Indian languages and sound recordings of tribal languages. Within the Western History Collections are the Doris Duke Oral History Project and the Pioneer Papers, which include an oral history of the early history of the state, records of the Cherokee tribal government, and an extensive photo archive. The Carl Albert Center houses papers of a number of political figures who were influential in the formation of American Indian policy.

financial aid available to students: Information is available through OU Financial Aid Services, 731 Elm St., Robertson Hall, Rm. 125, Norman, OK 73019-2111. TEL (405)325-4521; FAX (405) 325-7608; http://www.finaid.ou.edu. Also, the American Indian Student Services office (http://studentlife.ou.edu/content/view/4/5/) , within the Center for Student Life, provides assistance and referrals for financial aid: Oklahoma Memorial Union, Rm. 370. TEL (405) 325-3163.

number of students in program: 53

distance learning: No distance learning programs; some online courses.



*                       *                       *                       *                       *

title of program: M.A. in Native American Studies

degree(s) granted: M.A.

description of program offerings: Seminars in Native American Studies, History, Anthropology, English, and Art History.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian Education Policy, Tribal Economic Development, Higher Education & American Indians, Native American poetry, contemporary Native literature, Southeastern Indian writers, Native Drama, women's writing, creative writing, History of Indians in Oklahoma, Socio-linguistics, identity theory, Contemporary American Indian artists, Mesoamerican art, American Indian flute music, stomp dance music, and pow-wow culture in Oklahoma, relationships between Indigenous nations and anthropology, research ethics, and global Indigenous issues.

resources available: (See description for undergraduate program.)

financial aid available to students: Three graduate assistantships; various loans and grants available through the University financial aid office.

number of students in program: 12

distance learning: [information not provided]


Oklahoma State University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: John M. Chaney, Ph.D.

degrees granted: Minor.

description of program offerings: Introduction to American Indian Studies; American Indian Sovereignty; American Indian Entrepreneurship; North American Indian Art & Cultures; Frontier and American Culture; Native American Literature; Readings in the American Experience; Mvskoke Language and Culture, Indians in America (History); Geography of Indian Country; Managing Diversity in the Workplace; Minority, Ethnic & Regional Psychology of Minorities; Minorities in American Politics; Religions of Native Americans; Exploration in Sociological Issues; Multicultural Psychology.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian anthropology, American Indian literature, American Indian law & sovereignty, American Indian history, contemporary and historical American Indian education, American Indian psychology, American Indian religions, American Indian entrepreneurship.

resources available: Center for American Indian Studies (AMIS), Native American Faculty and Staff Association (NAFSA), Native American Students Association (NASA), American Indians in Science and Engineering (AISES), Native Americans in the Biological Sciences (NABS), American Indians Into Psychology (AIIP).

financial aid available to students: Out-of-state tuition waiver for Native American students (must maintain a 2.5 GPA or higher); Native American Faculty and Staff Scholarship(s); American Indians Into Psychology undergraduate and graduate scholarships.

number of students in program: 1,400 on campus as of September 5, 2012

distance learning: no


University of Ottawa

title of program: Études Autochtones/Aboriginal Studies Program (EAS)

name\title of head\director: Brenda Macdougall, coordinator

degree(s) granted: B.A.

description of program offerings: See website.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: history, religion, environment, law.

resources available: Aboriginal Student services; Aboriginal Student's Council; Indigenous and Canadian Studies Students Association.

financial aid available to students: See university website.

number of students in program: 42

distance learning: no


Portland State University

title of program: Indigenous Nations Studies

name\title of head\director: Cornel Pewewardy, Director & Professor of Indigenous Nations Studies

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: PSU's Indigenous Nations Studies (INS) Program was inaugurated in 2004 and presently offers a Minor in Indigenous Nations Studies. INS is an interdisciplinary program with coursework drawn from Anthropology, Art, English, History, Linguistics, Political Science, and other departments and schools. The substantive focus of this curriculum is the histories and cultures of American Indians, Alaska native, and Native Hawaiians. The minor is meant to serve three primary constituencies: students who have a serious academic interest in Native Americans and who wish to combine the study of Native Americans with their major; students who plan careers in Indian or native affairs; and students who have a nascent interest in Native Americans and wish to fulfill their general education requirements with courses in this area. This program prepares students to work for tribal governments and native-oriented organizations as professionals, or as informed professionals in organizations not specifically dedicated to native issues, but which interact with tribal governments on a government-to-government or business basis.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: [See above]

resources available: Native American Student and Community Center; AISES and UISHE chapters; Native American Student Services advisor; American Indian Urban Teacher Program.

financial aid available to students: [contact Portland State University]

number of students in program: approximately 40

distance learning: no


St. Cloud State University

title of program: American Indian Studies Minor

name\title of head\director: Jeanne Lacourt, AIS Advisor [jalacourt@stcloudstate.edu]

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: The Department of Ethnic Studies at St. Cloud State offers minors in Ethnic Studies, African American Studies, American Indian Studies, Asian Pacific American Studies, and Chicano/a Studies. Coming soon: Ethnic Studies Major.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: See above minor offerings.

resources available: Multicultural Student Services; Multicultural Resource Center; American Indian Center; Richard Green House; Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano/a de Atzlan (MEChA); All Tribes Council (ATC)

financial aid available to students: Yes.

number of students in program: [Information not provided.]

distance learning: [information not provided]


St Lawrence University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Melissane Parm Schrems, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: B.A. Minor

description of program offerings: We have courses in anthropology, biology, English, enviromental studies, global studies, government, history, performance & communication arts, and philosophy.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: [As above.]

resources available: Advisory Board for the Native American Studies Program (faculty/staff); Center for Diversity and Social Justice; First Peoples Students Alliance (student organization).

financial aid available to students: yes.

number of students in program: 0

distance learning: [information not provided]


College of St. Scholastica

title of program: American Indian Studies

department in which housed: Department of History and Politics

name\title of head\director: Barbara King, Program Director

degrees granted: B.A. minor.

description of program offerings: The American Indian Studies program, within the Department of History and Politics, provides opportunities for St. Scholastica students to study history, contemporary developments, tribal cultures, language and to interact with Indian professionals and peers.

The American Indian Studies minor is a 24-credit semester program designed to complement programs in a variety of different majors. The objectives of the major are: (1) to promote awareness and understanding of the history, culture, and philosophy of American Indians; (2) to recognize the different life experiences of American Indians; and (3) to improve the ability of students to integrate this knowledge with their future careers.

The Social Work and American Indian Studies programs have also collaborated to design a course of study that builds on traditional social work methods with specific knowledge about American Indians. The student is prepared more fully to understand the uniqueness of social work practice and American Indians through the study of cultural, social, and political problems that face American Indians. The beginning social work practitioner learns to be sensitive and skillful in intervention with individuals, groups, families, and large systems of this population.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Social work, art, American Indian women, Ojibwe language and music.

resources available: A special center, the Indian Cultural and Resource Center, serves as the nucleus of the various Indian programs and activities. Indigenous Student Alliance Club is the students' club and involves itself in such activities as Indian Awareness Week, fund-raising, peer advising, and community outreach.

financial aid available to students: The Indian Scholarship Program is offered by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, often in cooperation with state education departments, for individuals of American Indian descent who meet eligibility requirements. The College also offers one additional scholarship for Indian students.

number of students in program: 12

distance learning: no


St. Thomas University

title of program: Native Studies

name\title of head\director: [information not provided]

degree(s) granted: B.A.

description of program offerings: Native language education; history; law; politics; social sciences; from an historical and materialist perspective.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native language immersion, Maritime history, constitutional law, land rights, Metis rights, suicide, racism, genocide, public health, colonialism, activism.

resources available: See www.nativestudies.org

financial aid available to students: Counselling services available to explore possibilities.

number of students in program: 30+

distance learning: Yes, in limited, specific areas.


San Diego State University

title of program: Department of American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: David Kamper, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. Major and Minor

description of program offerings: A lower division course, American Indian Heritage, and upper division courses including American Indian Oral Literature, Federal Indian Law, Survey of Indian Languages, American Indian Women in American Society, American Indian Political Experience, Indian Peoples of California, American Indian Poetry and Fiction, American Indians Through Film and Television, American Indian History, Roots of Indian Tradition, American Indian Contemporary Issues, Historical, Cultural and Political Context of Tribal Gaming, American Indian Identity, Environmental Management, and Special Study.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Federal Indian Law, American Indian history, American Indian languages, contemporary issues, tribal economic development, American Indian political issues, American Indian literature and American Indian religion, Tribal Governmental Gaming, cultural studies.

resources available: Native American Student Alliance, American Indian Recruitment and Mentoring Program, Sycuan Institute on Tribal Gaming, American Indian Community Advisory Board; 18 reservations in San Diego County.

financial aid available to students: Only emergency financial aid.

number of students in program: 20-30

distance learning: Three online classes: American Indian Heritage, American Indian Contemporary Issues, and American Indian Identity.


San Francisco State University

title of program: Department of American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Andrew Jolivette, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. Major and Minor in AIS, AIS as part of a special major, AIS as an emphasis in the M.A. in Ethnic Studies.

description of program offerings: The department's educational mission and objectives have a special responsibility to Native peoples of California and the United States. California is the land on which the university and department rests; CSU is a public institution in the United States education system. Therefore, significant aspects of the program and curriculum are focused on Natives of California, US-Native politics, and North American Indian cultures with the aim of preparing students to work with Native groups and urban communities in California and the United States. The program also includes a comparative perspective and coalitional politics with Native peoples of U.S. occupied territories and more broadly within the Americas and the Pacific. It balances classroom education with an active community participatory learning component. Therefore, it best prepares students for going on to do graduate work or a number of different careers with Native peoples in not only California but internationally.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian law and politics; California Indian Studies; creative arts and the humanities; science, health, and the environment; community participatory learning. Faculty: Joanne Barker, Robert Keith Collins, Clay Dumont (affiliated), Andrew Jolivétte, Phil Klasky, Melissa Nelson, John-Carlos Perea and Kathy Wallace.

resources available: Student Kouncil of Intertribal Nations (student organization)

financial aid available to students: Jacques Johnet Scholarship for American Indians

number of students in program: 50 declared Minors; Major being implemented in 2007-08.

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Saskatchewan

title of program: Native Studies

name\title of head\director: Winona Wheeler, Department Head

degrees granted: B.A.; B.A. Honours; M.A.; special case PhD.

description of program offerings: As an emergent discipline, Native Studies is still in a formative stage. During its foundational era, Native Studies has drawn heavily on a number of long-established disciplines, in particular Anthropology and History, and it has only just begun to take shape as an independent field of study. One sign of this evolution is the increasing number of tenure-track faculty and sessional instructors, who are Native Studies graduates and specialists, as opposed to academics drawn from other fields of scholarship. From its multi-disciplinary foundation, Native Studies is progressively acquiring an independent and unique basis for its teaching and research. Therefore, Native Studies can no longer be accurately considered simply as a prescribed, interdisciplinary program, it is an evolving stand-alone field of enquiry that has, at its core, the sole focus of Aboriginal society and societies. Native Studies is bounded only by the extent of Aboriginal society and societies and not by a parent discipline, or a single methodology or ideology. Another significant difference between Native Studies and other disciplines is that other disciplines tend to examine Aboriginal societies exogenously, whereas Native Studies attempts to understand them from within. Native Studies holds that Aboriginal collectivities are unique localised social entities, who to be fully understood need to be considered in a national context and as integral to the global mosaic of Indigenous Peoples.
     From this basis Native Studies at the University of Saskatchewan actively supports the promotion and definition of Native Studies as an independent field of study that has at its core the scholarly enquiry into Aboriginal society and societies. The Department of Native Studies seeks to provide an intellectual milieu where teaching and research are well grounded in the priorities and knowledge of Saskatchewan's Aboriginal communities, all the while placing them within the larger fabric of the Canadian Aboriginal experience and the emergent global, social phenomenon of indigeneity. Researchers and students in Native Studies at the University of Saskatchewan explore and seek to understand the fundamental nature of Aboriginal society. As a centre of academic inquiry based on sound pedagogical and research principles, the Department of Native Studies is striving to develop more expansive and innovative views on Indigenous Knowledge, going well beyond simple binaries like juxtaposing Indigenous knowledge in opposition to Western scholarship. Rather the Department has taken on the more challenging task of demanding excellence in conventional scholarship in addition to developing new and culturally appropriate methodologies and theories sourced in the Aboriginal life.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: The department has seven faculty members. Our areas of specialization include First Nations and Métis history; oral history; Indigenous masculinities; labor; northern development and resource use; health policy and the politics of social health; political and legal issues; international Indigenous issues, Indigenous knowledge, anti-colonial research, transdisciplinary research methods and theory; and Cree language.

resources available: Aboriginal Students' Centre; National Native Access Program to Nursing (NNAPN); Indian Teacher Education Program (ITEP); Northern Teacher Education Program (NORTEP); Saskatchewan Urban Native Teacher Education Program (SUNTEP); The Aboriginal First Year Experience Program (AFYEP); Aboriginal Student Achievement Program (ASAP); Native Studies Review.

financial aid available to students: Good.

number of students in program: over 2000 students in courses, with between 35 - 50 majors, 9 M.A, 3 Ph.D.

distance learning: The department currently offers three courses online as well as in rural and northern communities. For more information contact the Centre for Continuing and Distance Education (CCDE) at http://www.extension.usask.ca/ExtensionDivision/credit/.


University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Lee Hester, Director

degrees granted: B.A.

description of program offerings: USAO's American Indian Studies program prepares its students for jobs in Federal, State and Tribal Government as well as tribal enterprises and large corporations by stressing the complex legal foundations of tribal sovereignty and the unique government-to-government relations that American Indian Nations have with the United States, as well as specialized courses in such areas as Casino Management. In addition to law and policy, American Indian students are encouraged to gain a thorough grounding in their tribal traditions, history and language both through regular classes and through independent studies with elders and other wisdomkeepers. All students will come away with a more thorough knowledge of American Indian Nations and their role in the modern world.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian sovereignty, law and policy; American Indian Philosophy; Contemporary American Indian issues; American Indian Languages and oral tradition, particularly Kiowa and Choctaw; American Indians and Environmental Ethics.

resources available: The program offers extension in-service and mid-career training.

financial aid available to students: May be accessed at http://www.usao.edu/~usao-aid/.

number of students in program: 20 majors, 15 minors.

distance learning: Distance learning options include numerous off-campus courses and telecourses offered according to demand as well as independent studies and workshops designed to fit the needs of individual students.


Simon Fraser University

title of program: First Nations Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn, Chair

degree(s) granted: B.A. major and minor; Archaeology/First Nations Studies joint major, Linguistics/First Nations Studies joint major.

description of program offerings: Major programme leading to a BA in the faculty of arts and sciences.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Archaeology; Contemporary Arts/Literature-autobiography; anthropology.

resources available: Office for Aboriginal Peoples; First Nations Students Association; Indigenous Students Centre.

financial aid available to students: Scholarships and awards dedicated to First Nations students are available through the awards office.

number of students in program: n/a

distance learning: no


Smith College

[See listing for Five Colleges, Inc.]


University of South Dakota

title of program: Native Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Emily Haddad, Acting Chair

degrees granted: B.A. with optional specializations available in both Oceti Sakowin Oyate Studies and Lakota Language; minors offered in Native Studies and Lakota Language Teaching.

description of program offerings: Native Studies offers a program of study grounding students in the fundamentals of the discipline as well as preparing them for the challenges that are unique to Native Peoples and Native Country, including the nation-to-nation relationship that exists between Native Peoples and modern states and non-state actors. The program is flexible enough for students to explore questions of major interest, to allow opportunities for meaningful undergraduate research, and to engage questions unique to Native Country through special topics courses. The program also includes specialization options in both Oceti Sakowin Oyate Studies (People of the Seven Council Fires, more commonly known as the Dakota/Lakota/Nakota people) and Lakota language.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Oceti Sakowin Oyate Studies; Lakota language; Oral History; Native Studies history; intellectual and disciplinary development of Native Studies; self-determination and decolonization.

resources available: South Dakota Oral History Center, Institute for American Indian Studies, Native American Cultural Center, and Tiospaye U. (student organization). The Native Studies program is also geographically located near the following Native homelands: Omaha, Ho Chunk, and Oceti Sakowin Oyate (Santee Sioux, Flandreau Sioux, Yankton Sioux, Lower Brule Sioux, Crow Creek Sioux, Upper Sioux, Lower Sioux, Shakopee Sioux, Prairie Island Sioux, Oglala Sioux, Rosebud Sioux, Cheyenne River, Sioux, Standing Rock Sioux, Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota, and Spirit Lake Sioux). The program is located near the following Native colleges and universities: Sinte Gleska University, Oglala Lakota College, Sitting Bull College, Sisseton Wahpeton College, Cankdeska Cikana Community College, United Tribes Technical College, Nebraska Indian Community College, and Little Priest Tribal College.

financial aid available to students: Graduate assistantships, undergraduate scholarships.

number of students in program: 30

distance learning: yes


South Dakota State University

title of program: American Indian Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Richard Meyers, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Major and minor

description of program offerings: This is an interdisciplinary program with courses from nine different academic disciplines and a distinctive AIS course, Introduction to American Indian Studies. Courses from the following disciplines are included: Anthropology, English, Geography, History, Languages (Lakota -- 4 semesters available), Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, and Sociology.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: American Indian cultures, particularly Plains and D/L/Nakota cultures; American Indian literature of the past and present; Geography of the American Indians; History of American Indians and History of the American West; Lakota language; American Indian Philosophy; Tribal Governments and Politics; American Indian Religions; American Indians and Intergroup Relations.

resources available: Native American Advisor; Native American Club; Native American Advisory Committee (faculty, staff, and student membership -- provides recommendations for support and other services); library holdings, including videotapes of relevance to American Indians; 2 + 2 + 2 program linking tribal high schools, tribal colleges, & SDSU agricultural and consumer and family science programs.

financial aid available to students: In addition to the usual scholarships, workstudy, Pell grants, etc., funds for tutoring and emergency needs are available.

number of students in program: approximately 20-30.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Southeastern Oklahoma State University

title of program: Native Studies Minor

name\title of head\director: Dr. Deana Williams, Program Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: Minor only

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Multicultural and Diverse issues, Assessment.

resources available: Annual Native American Symposium, Native American Student Visitation Day, Native American Student Council.

financial aid available to students: Harvey Foundation Scholarships, numerous scholarships for teacher education.

number of students in program: Common majors related to the NativeStudies Minor include business, education and psychology. These major programs are consistently listed among the top 10 producers of Native American graduates each year by Diverse Issues in Higher Education.

distance learning: Yes.


Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Anthropology

name\title of head\director: Cory Willmott, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: The interdisciplinary minor in Native American Studies consists of courses from anthropology, art, history, philosophy, and political science.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: native cultures/material culture of the Great Lakes; Cherokee ethnohistory; native North Pacific Coast songs, oral tradition, and philosophy; indigenous politics; archaeology of native Illinois and the Midwest; native North American art

resources available: Service Learning projects, Museum Internships, and Undergraduate Research Scholarship opportunities.

financial aid available to students: Scholarships include the Johnetta Haley Scholarship.

number of students in program: 8-12

distance learning: no


Southern Oregon University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: David D. West, Director

degree(s) granted: minor, certificate

description of program offerings: Interdisciplinary courses in participating departments: Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, Social Science, History, English, Environmental Studies, History, Youth Programs.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Community Psychology, Youth collegiate preparation summer program, Theater, and Wellness.

resources available: Native American Student Union, Resource Library, Full Publications and Native American Digital Archives.

financial aid available to students: Diversity Scholarship

number of students in program: 42

distance learning: [information not provided]


Stanford University

title of program: Native American Studies, Center for Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity

name\title of head\director: C. Matthew Snipp

degree(s) granted: B.A. major and minor in Native American Studies

description of program offerings: An interdisciplinary curriculum drawn from courses (some including a service learning component) taught throughout the University, primarily in law, education, the social sciences and humanities.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, History, Education, Law.

resources available: The Native American Cultural Center, a student services unit, operates independently of Native American Studies, an academic program. However, NACC offers a wide range of activities, including a library, tutoring, social activities, a number of clubs, a computer cluster, and other activities related to the recruitment and retention of Native students. The University also sponsors a Native American theme house (Muwekma-Tah-Ruk) that is the residence for a mix of Native and non-Native students and has a residential education program devoted to NAS. The house operates independently of the NACC or NAS, though obviously there is a certain amount of overlap and cooperation among these units.

financial aid available to students: Through the University.

number of students in program: Usually 3-5 declared majors, 10-15 declared minors, but a substantially larger number of students who enroll in our courses.

distance learning: no


State University of New York at Buffalo

title of program: Program in Indigenous Studies

department in which housed: American Studies

name\title of head\director: Donald A. Grinde, Jr., Chair

degrees granted: B.A. in American Studies with a Focus in Indigenous/Native American Studies; M.A. and Ph.D. in American Studies with a Focus in Indigenous/Native American Studies

description of program offerings: Program has operated since 1970. The Program and Center for the Americas seek to contribute to scholarship in all areas of Indigenous Studies. Courses include Indian Image on Film, American Indian Law (co-listed with the School of Law), Indigenous Women, Introduction to Native American History, Mythology, Contemporary Problems of American Indians, Iroquois history, Native American Thought, U.S. American Indian Policy since 1871, Topics in Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Health and Healing, Native American Aesthetics, Native American Literature, Survey of Native American History Seminar I & II.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Environment, History, Law, International Indigenous Issues, Native American/indigenous Women, Literature, Cultural Studies, Art, Social Services.

resources available: Our faculty offers unique opportunities for training in historical research and on topics involving cultural interaction in a strong graduate program.

financial aid available to students: Several fellowships and teaching assistantships are available. Stipends vary. GRE required with scholarship application.

number of students in program: 80 M.A. and Ph.D. students, 30 undergraduates. 25 Native American graduate students in program.

distance learning: [information not provided]


State University of New York at Cortland

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Ellis McDowell-Loudan & Ms. Dawn Van Hall, Program Co-Coordinators

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: The Native American Studies Minor provides a broad range of information about the indigenous or first people of the Americas. It surveys archaeological, cultural, historical, and current perspectives of and about Native Americans (or First Nations). This interdisciplinary program includes courses from Anthropology, Sociology, History, English, Music, Art, Psychology and Health Departments. Some of today's important issues are emphasized and placed in the context of cultural history. One purpose of the minor is to introduce students to the tremendous richness and diversity that is present within today's Native cultures. The Native American Studies minor affirms the college's commitment, as a public university, to establish an academic program which supports the interest that many students have in Native American issues. The College works in partnership with representatives from Onondaga Nation to correct misconceptions about native people.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), New York State Native American History, Eastern USA Native American/Canadian First Nations Archaeology/Ethnology/Ethnohistory, Maya Language/Ethnology.

resources available: Multicultural publications and audiovisual collection; Native American Film Festival, which features speakers involved in the production of the films, as well as activists and local leaders; opportunities to visit the Onondaga Nation Territory, as well as other Haudenosaunee Nation territories within our region are often planned. Guest speakers from many Native American cultures regularly are invited to the college to enrich the program. Native American musicians, artists, craftspeople, and storytellers make presentations on campus, providing added opportunities for students to meet these nationally and internationally known artists.

financial aid available to students: Admissions and Financial Aid Offices, SUNY Cortland, Miller Building (www.cortland.edu)

number of students in program: 2-4

distance learning: occasional online classes


State University of New York at Fredonia

title of program: American Indian Studies minor

department in which housed: Interdisciplinary Studies

name\title of head\director: Jennifer Hildebrand, Ethnic Studies Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: 21 credit hours including Introduction to American Indian Studies and courses in Literature and History and electives from Anthropology, Art, Sociology, and Education.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: history, literature, poetry, music.

resources available: Native American Consortium, SUNY library system, reservation libraries.

financial aid available to students: National, State TAP, native scholarships.

number of students in program: 0

distance learning: no


State University of New York, College at Oswego

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Anthropology and Interdisciplinary Programs and Activities Center

name\title of head\director: Dr. Stephen Saraydar, Director

degrees granted: B.A. minor.

description of program offerings: Individual courses in Native American diversity, arts, literatures, and history; federal Indian law and policy, media images of Native Americans, contemporary issues, Iroquois history and issues. Independent study directed by faculty teaching in the program.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Canadian treaty rights, Southeastern Indians, urban Indian issues, AIDS in Indian communities, Iroquois legal issues, health issues, representations in film, Native American painting and sculpture, federal recognition, Native American literatures.

resources available: The Native American Heritage Association is a student-run organization that provides a comfortable climate for Native students and educates the general student body about Native American cultures and issues. Penfield Library has an extensive collection of resource materials on Native American Studies, including the journals American Indian Quarterly, American Indian Law Review, and Akwesasne Notes, among others.

financial aid available to students: Aid is available through the college. For more information call Kevin White at (315) 312-3481.

number of students in program: 10

distance learning: Not yet.


State University of New York at Potsdam

title of program: Native American Studies

department in which housed: Anthropology

name\title of head\director: Susan Stebbins, Director

degree(s) granted: B.A. Minor

description of program offerings: The Native Americans, Indian Images, Women in Native American Cultures, Mohawk Language I, II, III (students may fulfill their language requirement with Mohawk), Native Americans in Fiction and Film, Native American Literatures, History and Cultures of MesoAmerica . . . this is a sampling, varies by semester.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology/archaeology, history, literature.

resources available: Native American Affairs Office, Potsdam Association of Native Americans (PANA), and CSTEP. For more information contact Sheila Marshall at marshasm@potsdam.edu.

financial aid available to students: Yes, both through the school and the Akwesasne Mohawk Reservation.

number of students in program: About 15 students enrolled in the minor; 82 Native American (Mohawk) students. Many students take many of the available classes, without declaring a minor.

distance learning: We do now have distance learning classes, though not specially in Native American Studies. Students can fulfill other college requirements through distance learning.


University of Sudbury

title of program: Department of Native Studies

name\title of head\director: Darrel Manitowabi, Chair

degrees granted: B.A. (General and Honours); Aboriginal Legal Education Certificate.

description of program offerings: Courses on tradition and culture, legal and political issues, Cree and Ojibwe, community organization, education, research, health, women's studies, economic development.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Culture (Anishinaabe), Aboriginal-non-Aboriginal relations, political and legal issues, language (Ojibwa/Ottawa, Cree, Algonquin), education, health, and economic development.

resources available: Native Students Association, Native Student Lounge, Native Student Affairs. The University of Sudbury library has an extensive collection of books on Native American culture, history, languages, and politics.

financial aid available to students: Many entrance and in-course scholarships and bursaries are available from both Laurentian University and the University of Sudbury; financial aid is also available.

number of students in program: 35

distance learning: B.A. (General and Honours)


Syracuse University

title of program: Native American Studies program

department in which housed: Interdisciplinary Studies Program housed in the College of Arts and Science

name\title of head\director: Philip P. Arnold, Interim Director

degree(s) granted: B.A. minor

description of program offerings: Fall 2011: Introduction to Native American Studies, Haudenosaunee Language & Culture, Indigenous Religions, Discovery & Indigenous Peoples.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Consult the website: http://thecollege.syr.edu/students/undergraduate/interdisciplinary/nativ e-american-studies/faculty_directory.html.

resources available: Native Student Program(NSP) (http://multicultural.syr.edu/programs/nsp.html); NSP Early Orientation; Native American Students at Syracuse University (NASAS); Native American Learning Community http://lc.syr.edu/content/which.aspx); Center for Indigenous Law, Governance & Citizenship (http://www.law.syr.edu/academics/center-and-institutes/indigenous-law-governance-citizenship/index.aspx); Center for Native Peoples and the Environment (http://www.esf.edu/nativepeoples/); Haudenosaunee Emissary (rrloder@maxwell.syr.edu).

financial aid available to students: Haudenosaunee Promise Scholarship (http://www.syr.edu/financialaid/scholarships/su_scholarships_list/haudenosaunee_promise.html).

number of students in program: 17 minors in Spring 2011.

distance learning: Not for Native Studies courses.


University of Toronto

title of program: Aboriginal Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Deborah McGregor, Interim Director

degrees granted: B.A. Hon. specialist, major and minor.

description of program offerings: Aboriginal languages (Ojibwe, Oneida, Inuktitut), Aboriginal culture, history, spirituality, science, creativity, knowledges (including traditional ecological knowledge).

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Literature, language, cultures, history, anthropology, geography, social work, art and music.

resources available: First Nations House, Student Services, First Nations House magazine, speaker series, SAGE graduate education support.

financial aid available to students: Contact Admissions and Awards, 315 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A3.

number of students in program: 151 undergraduate students at University of Toronto have declared specialization in Aboriginal Studies (62 minors, 54 majors and 35 specialists).

distance learning: no


Trent University

title of program: Department of Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: David Newhouse, Chair

degrees granted: Diploma, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. We offer a program in Native Management and Economic Development in collaboration with the Administrative Studies Program and a program in Indigenous Environmental Studies in collaboration with the Environmental Resources Studies Program.

description of program offerings: Approximately 25 undergraduate courses including General Introduction to Native Studies; Aboriginal Politics, Aboriginal Governance, Aboriginal Law, Native Identity Development, Oral and Written Ojibway, Oral Mohawk, Iroquoian Culture and Tradition, Aboriginal Women, Aboriginal Culture and Community, Aboriginal Education, Research Methods (Oral Histories, Community Based Research), History (Indians in Canada, Metis); Contemporary Aboriginal Organizations (Management and Organization Behaviour); Aboriginal Literatures, Aboriginal Theatre, Traditional Knowledge, Indigenous Environmental Knowledge, Environmental Assessment in Aboriginal Communities.
        Graduate courses (Masters and Doctoral) include in seminars in Indigenous Knowledge, Governance, Indigenous Research Methods, Aboriginal History and Politics and Aboriginal Social and Culture Issues.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Faculty: Shirley Williams (Ojibway Language), Edna Manitowabi (Indigenous Knowledge, Aboriginal Women); Don McCaskill (Education, International Indigenous Peoples); John Milloy (History, Indian Residential Schools); Lynne Davis (Community Education and Development); Kiera Ladner (Modern Aboriginal Societies and Governance); Mark Dockstator (Aboriginal Law and Governance); David Newhouse (Aboriginal Economies and Governance); Leanne Simpson (Indigenous Knowledge and Environmental Studies).

resources available: Trent University Native Association, Aboriginal student counsellor, cultural advisor/traditional person in residence, local Aboriginal organizations: Friendship Centre, Women's Centre, Healing Lodge.

financial aid available to students: Government funding, as well as various University Bursaries and scholarships.

number of students in program: 800 students in courses. Approximately 250 Aboriginal students out of total student population of 5000.

distance learning: [information not provided]


Valparaiso University

title of program: Indian Studies Minor

name\title of head\director: Dr. Ronald Janke

degree(s) granted: M.A. minor

description of program offerings: Native American on Film, Indian Culture Areas, Field courses to Indian Reservations, Arch. digs, internships on reservations etc.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Land tenure in allotted reservations.

resources available: Club.

financial aid available to students: Yes.

number of students in program: 8

distance learning: no


Vancouver Island University

title of program: First Nations Studies

name\title of head\director: Keith Smith, Ph.D. and Laura Cranmer, M.A.

degree(s) granted: B.A.; Diploma in First Nations Studies

description of program offerings: See: http://www.viu.ca/calendar/UniversityDegreeCompletion/bamajorsminors/firstnationsstudies.asp

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Culture, History, Arts, Indigenous/Settler Relations, Governance, Family and Community, Environment, etc.

resources available: Elders in residence and in the classroom; Shq'apthut (Gathering Place) on campus; Strong First Nations Community Support and Learning Community on Campus; Nearby Friendship Centres.

financial aid available to students: Organized through the institutions.

number of students in program: [Information not provided.]

distance learning: So far, only relatively nearby "distance" locations.


University of Victoria

title of program: Indigenous Studies

department in which housed: History

name\title of head\director: Christine O'Bonsawin

degree(s) granted: B.A. Minor

description of program offerings: The Faculty of Humanities and the Faculty of Social Sciences jointly offer an interdisciplinary program in Indigenous Studies intended to provide both indigenous and non-indigenous students with a core program incorporating indigenous world views and ways of knowing. This is a General Program leading to the BA degree. Students may obtain a Minor by completing the requirements for the General Program together with a Major or Honours program, or other degree program, in another department or faculty.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Professor O'Bonsawin - Indigenous sport history; colonial/Indian relations and representations at world's fairs and Olympic Games; Indian policy

resources available: Office of Indigenous Affairs; LE, NONET: A Project to Support the Success of Aboriginal Students; First Peoples House.

financial aid available to students: none.

number of students in program: [n/a]

distance learning: no

*                     *                     *                     *

title of program: Indigenous Governance Programs

faculty in which housed: Human and Social Development

name\title of head\director: Dr. Gerald Taiaiake Alfred, Director; Jeff Corntassel, PhD, Graduate Advisor.

degree(s) granted: M.A. in Indigenous Governance (MAIG) and Ph.D. by Special Arrangement

description of program offerings: The MAIG is an interdisciplinary leadership program that provides students with a strong foundation of basic and applied scholarly research and a path to understanding global and local politics among Indigenous peoples, with a special emphasis on the nature and context of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Indigenous resurgence; Indigenous self-determination, decolonization, strategies for community regeneration; Indigenous women and resistance; international relations.

resources available: See http://web.uvic.ca/indigenous/programs. html.

financial aid available to students: The program offers one fellowship to the applicant with the highest GPA on entry into the program. Deadline for its application is January 15th, for the following September start date. Information on other scholarships and bursaries is found at this link to student financial aid: http://registrar.uvic.ca/safa/.

number of students in program: MAIG 29, PhD 4

distance learning: no.


Virginia Tech

title of program: American Indian Studies

department in which housed: Sociology

name\title of head\director: Dr. Samuel R. Cook, Director

degree(s) granted: Undergraduate Minor; graduate certificate

description of program offerings: We believe that any successful American Indian Studies program must do more than simply educate a general student body on American Indian cultures and issues in a sensitive way. We believe that our curricula must exist in conjunction with all university programs pertinent to American Indians, and must depend on the impetus of indigenous peoples working within and beyond the university.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native literature, history, anthropology.

resources available: [Information not provided]

financial aid available to students: n/a

number of students in program: [Information not provided]


University of Washington

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Tom Grayson Colonnese, Director

degrees granted: B.A. Major and Minor in American Indian Studies, M.A. in Indigenous Documentary Film Making.

description of program offerings: The Department of American Indian Studies offers a major in American Indian Studies, a minor in American Indian Studies, and a master's degree in Native American Documentary Film, Video, and New Digital Media in partnership with the Department of Communication.
     American Indian Studies approaches its teaching and research from a decolonized, community based, and global perspective. American Indian Studies faculty and students strive to develop innovative theories and methodologies that increase knowledge about Indigenous Peoples and support the needs of Indigenous communities. The department promotes faculty and student exchange programs with institutions that are committed to a deeper understanding of Indigenous communities and Peoples throughout the world.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: (See above.)

resources available: Washington State has 34 Indian tribes with 26 reservation communities, a growing population, and a number of inter-tribal and other related organizations, many with close ties to neighboring groups in Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and British Columbia and Alberta. Seattle is home to the regional Federal Archives with important tribal records. The University also has important archival and museum collections.

financial aid available to students: Special financial aid is available through the Equal Opportunity Program.

number of students in program: c. 80.

distance learning: [information not provided]


West Virginia University

title of program: Native American Studies

name\title of head\director: Bonnie M. Brown, Coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: This is an 18-credit minor. Three lower division courses are required: Intro to Native American Studies, American Indian History, and Literature of Native America. Further, students complete 9 credits (typically three 3-credit courses) of upper division coursework to complete the degree. These credits can include independent study, internships, and field work.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: See the "faculty" listing on our website at www.wvu.edu/~nas for an extensive listing of our interdisciplinary faculty committee.

resources available: See our website under the link "student resources," "ONAI," and many others.

financial aid available to students: See "student resources" link on our web menu; see also http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/09/01/too-many-scholarships-not-enough-native-students-applying-132188

number of students in program: 20 minors

distance learning: Many online and travel courses are offered (such as Cherokee, NC, Alaska Yup'ik Village, Native Hawaii).




Western Carolina University

title of program: Cherokee Studies

department in which housed: Anthropology & Sociology

name\title of head\director: Dr. Jane Eastman

degree(s) granted: B.A. minor and graduate certificate in Cherokee Studies (contact Dr. Jane Eastman at jeastman@email.wcu.edu for more information); M.A. in American History, Cherokee Studies track (contact Alex Macaulay at macaulay@email.wcu.edu for more information); Culturally-Based Native Health Certificate (contact Dr. Lisa Lefler at llefler@email.wcu.edu for more information).

description of program offerings: Cherokee History; Contemporary Cherokee Culture; Indians of North America; Native American Literature; Cherokee Language; Native Health Topics; Ethnobotany; various courses in area of expertise of Endowed Chair in Cherokee Studies.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Cherokee Pottery; Cherokee Language Revitalization; Archaeology; Cherokee History; Native Healthcare; Cherokee Ethnobotany.

resources available: Di-Ga-Li-I, the Native Student Group; Judaculla Culture House, a specialized dormitory for students interested in Cherokee culture and language; library houses one of the largest Cherokee collections in the U.S.

financial aid available to students: Graduate assistantships.

number of students in program: 20.

distance learning: Yes. We are working toward offering more classes online. Please check http://www.wcu.edu/6311.asp for new offerings each semester.



*                       *                       *                       *                       *



title of program: M.A. in American History, Cherokee Studies Track

department in which housed: History

name\title of head\director: Elizabeth McRae

degree(s) granted: M.A.

description of program offerings: Cherokee History; Contemporary Cherokee Culture; Indians of North America; Native American Literature; Cherokee Language; various courses in area of expertise of Endowed Chair in Cherokee Studies.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Cherokee and Southeastern Indians.

resources available: Native American Club; Library houses one of the largest Cherokee collections in the U.S.

financial aid available to students: Graduate assistantships.

number of students in program: 5-6.

distance learning: We do offer some coursework online: see http://www.wcu.edu/Cherokeestudies/ to find out about what is being offered.


University of Western Ontario

title of program: First Nations Studies

name\title of head\director: Jerry White, Director

degree(s) granted: B.A. (3yr, 4yr, 4yr honours)

description of program offerings: We offer a minor, major, and honors module. Please see the website for further information.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: History, Borderlands, Health, Environment, customs and language (Mohawk and Ojibway).

resources available: First Nations Studies Reading Room and Video Collection; Indigenous Student Services with welcome centre; First Nations Student Association.

financial aid available to students: Yes, through the UWO and Indigenous Student Services; none specifically through the program.

number of students in program: 45.

distance learning: Yes, new as of September 2009.


Western Washington University

title of program: American Cultural Studies

name\title of head\director: Lawrence Estrada, Director; Tanis S'eiltin, Coordinator Native American Studies

degrees granted: B.A. (minor).

description of program offerings: American Cultural Studies is an interdisciplinary program that offers a B.A. The minor in American Indian Studies is designed to provide students with an in-depth study of the cultures and traditions, histories and arts of indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere. The minor is recommended for students who plan to collaborate with American Indians in research, educational, environmental, creative and political projects. The concentration is interdisciplinary and allows students to combine it with many major designations.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Native education, Native literatures, federal Indian policy, Northwest Native American history, Native American art, Northwest Native experience.

resources available: In addition to the financial support usually offered through the university's financial aids office, the program has several faculty of Native descent, support organizations (such as the Native American Student Union and Ethnic Student Center), and a location suited to both intellectual and experiential pursuits.

financial aid available to students: (See above.)

number of students in program: 12 minors.

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Winnipeg

title of program: Department of Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Julie Pelletier

degree(s) granted: B.A., M.A in Indigenous Studies

description of program offerings: (BA & MA) Indigenous Self-determination, International Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Women and Resilience, Ethnoecology, Biocultural Diversity, Indigenous Research Methods, Cree and Ojibwa languages; Pathways to Indigenous Knowledge, and multidisciplinary offerings from other departments; (MDP) Indigenous Thought and Worldviews, Environment and Sustainability, Comparative Indigenous Health, Interactive Global Classroom; Indigenous Economic Development, Spatial Statistics, Indigenous Peoples, Globalization and Development, Human Security and Indigenous Development, Development Project Planning and Evaluation, Domestic and International Field placements.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: (BA & MA) Canadian Aboriginal/Indigenous policy, international indigenous rights, biopolitics of indigenous knowledge, community-based conservation and resource management, language rights, residential schools, economic impacts of Indigenous gaming, Indigenous peoples in Ecuador, Colombia, Nicaragua, India, Canada, United States, New Zealand. Faculty with backgrounds in Political Science, Law, Anthropology, Human Ecology, Sociology, Natural Resource Management, and Economics; (MDP) Foreign affairs and policy; international indigenous rights; resource development and environmental assessments; sustainable development; health economics; international development; financial services and poverty; food security; and indigenous knowledge. Faculty with backgrounds in Anthropology, Political Science, Geography, International Relations and Development, Geography, Natural Resource Management, Mathematics and Statistics, and Economics.

resources available: Aboriginal Student Centre, CN Indigenous Resource Centre, and Graduate Employment Counselor.

financial aid available to students: Scholarships, Student Loan, Bursaries and Awards.

number of students in program: 40-50 in BA, 12-18 in MA.

distance learning: no

*     *      ;*     *

title of program: Master's in Development Practice - Indigenous Development

name\title of head\director: Claire Reid, Director of Masters in Development Practice

degree(s) granted: MDP in Development Practice in Indigenous Development

description of program offerings: The MDP is a professional course-based interdisciplinary degree that equips graduates to practice environmentally-sustainable and indigenous-guided development. Courses examine the health, environmental, economic, and social dimensions of indigenous development. Students participate in a domestic and an international field placement.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Foreign affairs and policy; international indigenous rights; resource development and environmental assessments; sustainable development; health economics; international development; financial services and poverty; food security; and indigenous knowledge.

resources available: CN Indigenous Resource Centre, Graduate Employment Counselor and Aboriginal Student Centre,

financial aid available to students: Scholarships, Student Loan, Bursaries and Awards.

number of students in program: 25 MDP students

distance learning: no


University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

title of program: American Indian Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Debra K. S. Barker, Director

degrees granted: B.A. major and minor in American Indian Studies.

description of program offerings: In addition to offering a major and minor in American Indian Studies, this program offers graduate studies in American Indian History, Literature, and Geography. This program takes special recruitment and retention initiatives for American Indian students and offers participation in the Native American Student Association.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Wisconsin Indian history and culture, native geographies, tribal government and sovereignty, American Indian art, American Indian languages and literature, education, science, curriculum development on American Indian Studies, American Indian Images in Popular Culture, American Indian voting. We have three American Indian faculty at this time and one who is retired but who still teaches for us on occasion.

resources available: There are close working relationships with Stockbridge-Munsee Mohicans, Lac Courte Oreilles (Chippewa), Lac du Flambeau (Chippewa), Sokaogan Ojibwe Mole Lake, Chicaugon Chippewa, and Black River Falls (Ho-Chunk) Indian communities. There is a Native American Student Association on campus.

financial aid available to students: There are several programs, including scholarships, available to American Indian Students.

number of students in program: 12 majors, 19 minors.

distance learning: We offer History 705 class for teachers (http://www.uwec.edu/ ce/education/wisconsinindian/index.htm), aan online ethnobotany course entitled "Ojibwe women, eco-feminism, and botanical knowledge," and 4 semesters of Ojibwe language and an Ojibwe language camp course in the summer, which is offered for grad or undergrad credit. Anyone can watch our Ojibwe language classes for free from our website.




University of Wisconsin Green Bay

title of program: First Nations Studies

name\title of head\director: Lisa M. Poupart, Chairperson

degree(s) granted: B.A. (Major and minor) in First Nations Studies; M.S. in Applied Leadership for Teaching and Learning (area of emphasis in indigenous education)

description of program offerings: This is an interdisciplinary program that reflects the philosophy and holistic worldview of American Indian people. Students will learn about, preserve, and promote the identity of the indigenous populations of North America, with particular emphasis on the nations of the Western Great lakes. American Indian Elder knowledge and tribal oral traditions are a primary source for learning and teaching throughout all course offerings.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Oneida Language; Poetry; American Indian Education; oral traditional teaching and learning; Elder Epistemology and indigenous teaching methods; American Indian law and policy, American Indian historical trauma, internalized oppression, healing historical trauma, decolonization efforts, Haudenosaunee history and culture, Menominee history and culture, Anishinabeg history and culture, curriculum and instruction, Wisconsin's Act 31 and teacher education.

resources available: The Education Center for First Nations Studies; Oral Traditional Elder Scholars in Residence on campus; Intertribal Student Council; American Intercultural Center (student services, advising, gathering place for Native students); Oneida Language Project.

financial aid available to students: Yes, contact admissions office.

number of students in program: 35+ undergraduates.

distance learning: Select classes provided on Saturdays, online, and in local tribal communities.


University of Wisconsin, Madison

title of program: American Indian Studies Program

name\title of head\director: Rand Valentine, Director; Denise Wiyaka, Associate Director.

degrees granted: Certificate in American Indian Studies.

description of program offerings: Regular offerings in American Indian Studies include folklore, archaeology, history, law, rural sociology, literature, anthropology, and social work.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: (See above.)

resources available: Extremely close to Ho-Chunk settlements, Native American Center (Madison Community), American Indian Studies Library, inter-institutional linkages with certain tribal colleges; Wunk Sheek (student organization), Indigenous Law Student Association, Council of American Indian Graduate and Professional Students, AISES, and American Indian Student Academic Services.

financial aid available to students: American Indian Alumni Scholarship, Wisconsin Indian Grant.

number of students in program: 150

distance learning: No.


University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

title of program: American Indian Studies

department in which housed: Inter-departmental, Inter-disciplinary

name\title of head\director: Donald E. Green, Interim Coordinator

degrees granted: An interdisciplinary degree is an option.

description of program offerings: This program offers courses in several academic departments, does research in American Indian studies, publishes texts, etc. in American Indian Studies.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: The western Great Lakes area is a special interest of faculty. There are American Indian faculty in the departments of Anthropology, Ethnic Studies, History, Literature, Philosophy, and Sociology.

resources available: There are approximately 10,000 American Indians living in the Milwaukee area. In addition, there are also ten reservations in Wisconsin.

financial aid available to students: BIA and Wisconsin Indian Grants are available to American Indian Students.

number of students in program: [Information not provided.]


U of Wisconsin - Stevens Point

title of program: Native American studies Minor

name\title of head\director: Henry St. Maurice, coordinator

degree(s) granted: Minor

description of program offerings: Wisconsin Indian Cultures, Native Cultures of North America, Native Peoples and Cultures of Mesoamerica, Contemporary Native American Cultures, Field Trips in Anthropology, American Indian Literature, The North American Indian, History of Architectural Design in the Americas, American Indian Environmental Philosophies, Native American Religions, Orientation to Native American Social Work.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Anthropology, English, History, Architecture, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Sociology.

resources available: Native American Center, Learning Resource Center.

financial aid available to students: n.a.

number of students in program: 10

distance learning: [information not provided]


University of Wisconsin - Superior

title of program: First Nations Studies

name\title of head\director: Gary W. Johnson, Director

degrees granted: Minor only.

description of program offerings: The American Indian Studies Program seeks to promote an understanding and awareness of Indian people. The program provides the opportunity for Indians and non-Indians alike to increase their knowledge of the origin of Indian people in terms of history, culture, and philosophy.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Tribal administration; Ojibwa language; American Indian values and spiritual beliefs; historical foundations of American Indian education; contemporary issues in American Indian society; American Indian counseling and social work.

resources available: The Circle of Native Nations, which sponsors such activities as field trips to local reservations, pow-wows, talking circles, potluck dinners, spiritual ceremonies, Sugarbush camp, canoeing, and a fall walk around.

financial aid available to students: While the Center provides no financial aid, the Center does help Native American students with the University's financial aid process. We also offer a $1000 scholarship for Native students in their junior or senior year.

number of students in program: The Native American student population is 2% of the student body.

distance learning: Several courses available on-line.


University of Wyoming

title of program: American Indian Studies

name\title of head\director: Dr. Judith Antell

degrees granted: B.A. major and minor; M.A. minor; Ph.D. minor

description of program offerings: Interdisciplinary courses from a variety of areas including geography, sociology, anthropology, literature, language, and history.

areas of faculty interest\expertise: History, regional studies, contemporary issues, women, reservation land management, literature and tribal languages.

resources available: Support services for American Indian students; program library and student center; American Indian student club for Native students in all disciplines, and student/faculty club affiliated with the discipline of American Indian Studies; Elder-in-Residence Project.

financial aid available to students: McCarthy, Winner, and Thorpe Scholarships; The Northern Arapaho Endowment; The Chief Washakie Memorial Scholarship.

number of students in program: 22 undergraduate minors; 9 graduate minors (both M.A. and Ph.D.).

distance learning: a variety of classes online, through UW's Outreach School.


York University

title of program: Multicultural and Indigenous Studies

name\title of head\director: Tania Das Gupta

degree(s) granted: B.A.; Certificate in Indigenous Studies

description of program offerings: Indigenous Studies is part of the Multicultural and Indigenous Studies field; students specialize in the Indigenous Studies stream and take all but 3 courses in that stream (the other 3 courses are general required courses for the entire Multicultural and Indigenous Studies program).

areas of faculty interest\expertise: Urban, Non-status and Metis Identities, Indigenous Justice, Indigenous Music, Indigenous literature; First Nations/Native American Histories, First Nations Politics

resources available: Centre for Aboriginal Student Services (http://yustart.info.yorku.ca/2012/04/aboriginal-student-services/); York Aboriginal Student Association (http://yustart.info.yorku.ca/2012/04/aboriginal-student-services)

financial aid available to students: no

number of students in program: Usually about 20 students either in the Undergraduate program or the certificate.

distance learning: Not yet.